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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Salehezadeh, Zohre; Kickham, Kenneth
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    This article investigates work incentives for various family structures in Oklahoma based on tax and public assistance policies in effect as of March 2004. We use a quantitative spreadsheet model of the interactions among several benefit programs and the tax system to analyze their cumulative effect on household resources. Specifically, we calculate household resources based on family structure, program participation, labor force participation, and wage rate. We find that there are cliffs along the way to increasing human capital and becoming self-sufficient, implying that household resources can shrink as wage rates increase, creating disincentives to work. (author abstract)

    This article investigates work incentives for various family structures in Oklahoma based on tax and public assistance policies in effect as of March 2004. We use a quantitative spreadsheet model of the interactions among several benefit programs and the tax system to analyze their cumulative effect on household resources. Specifically, we calculate household resources based on family structure, program participation, labor force participation, and wage rate. We find that there are cliffs along the way to increasing human capital and becoming self-sufficient, implying that household resources can shrink as wage rates increase, creating disincentives to work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sherraden, Michael; Han, Chang-Keun
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    This study aims to examine the extent to which competing theories explain saving of low-income households in Individual Development Accounts (IDAs). Competing theories include the individual-oriented perspective, a social stratification perspective, and institutional saving theory. We use American Dream Demonstration (ADD) data collected at the Tulsa IDA program. Compared with the individual perspective and the social stratification perspective, institutional features explain a large part of the variance in saving outcomes measured by average monthly net deposit (AMND) and deposit frequency. Findings suggest that institutional structures encouraging low-income households to save may contribute to more inclusive asset-based policy. (author abstract)

    This study aims to examine the extent to which competing theories explain saving of low-income households in Individual Development Accounts (IDAs). Competing theories include the individual-oriented perspective, a social stratification perspective, and institutional saving theory. We use American Dream Demonstration (ADD) data collected at the Tulsa IDA program. Compared with the individual perspective and the social stratification perspective, institutional features explain a large part of the variance in saving outcomes measured by average monthly net deposit (AMND) and deposit frequency. Findings suggest that institutional structures encouraging low-income households to save may contribute to more inclusive asset-based policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Han, Chang-Keun
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    Using longitudinal data collected at the Tulsa Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) program, this study aims to examine to what degree unemployment and accompanying financial hardship are associated with savings in Individual Development Accounts. Of 328 participants in the IDA program, 89 (27%) participants experienced unemployment during the 4-year demonstration period. Participants who experienced unemployment during the demonstration period were more likely to perceive financial hardship. Furthermore, unemployed participants with financial hardship were found to save less, as measured by average monthly net deposit (AMND), than participants who were employed throughout the demonstration. Policy and practice implications are discussed. (author abstract)

    Using longitudinal data collected at the Tulsa Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) program, this study aims to examine to what degree unemployment and accompanying financial hardship are associated with savings in Individual Development Accounts. Of 328 participants in the IDA program, 89 (27%) participants experienced unemployment during the 4-year demonstration period. Participants who experienced unemployment during the demonstration period were more likely to perceive financial hardship. Furthermore, unemployed participants with financial hardship were found to save less, as measured by average monthly net deposit (AMND), than participants who were employed throughout the demonstration. Policy and practice implications are discussed. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nam, Yunju; Kim, Youngmi; Clancy, Margaret; Zager, Robert; Sherraden, Michael
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    This study examines the impacts of Child Development Accounts (CDAs) on account holding, saving, and asset accumulation for children, using data from the SEED for Oklahoma Kids experiment (SEED OK). SEED OK, a policy test of universal and progressive CDAs, provides a 529 college savings plan account to every infant in the treatment group with automatic account opening and an initial deposit. SEED OK also encourages treatment participants to open their own 529 accounts with an account opening incentive and a savings match. Using a sample of infants randomly selected from birth records (N = 2,670) and randomly assigned to treatment and control groups, this study runs probit and ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions. Analyses show significant differences between treatment and control groups in all outcome measures in the targeted accounts. Nearly 100 percent of the treatment group accepted the automatically opened state-owned account. Compared to 1 percent of the control group, 16 percent of the treatment group hold a participant-owned account. On average, the treatment group has...

    This study examines the impacts of Child Development Accounts (CDAs) on account holding, saving, and asset accumulation for children, using data from the SEED for Oklahoma Kids experiment (SEED OK). SEED OK, a policy test of universal and progressive CDAs, provides a 529 college savings plan account to every infant in the treatment group with automatic account opening and an initial deposit. SEED OK also encourages treatment participants to open their own 529 accounts with an account opening incentive and a savings match. Using a sample of infants randomly selected from birth records (N = 2,670) and randomly assigned to treatment and control groups, this study runs probit and ordinary least squares (OLS) regressions. Analyses show significant differences between treatment and control groups in all outcome measures in the targeted accounts. Nearly 100 percent of the treatment group accepted the automatically opened state-owned account. Compared to 1 percent of the control group, 16 percent of the treatment group hold a participant-owned account. On average, the treatment group has saved significantly larger amounts in participant-owned accounts, although a difference in savings amount is modest between the two groups ($47 vs. $13). A difference in total 529 assets of $1,040 is estimated between the treatment and control groups. These early findings from SEED OK suggest that CDAs have positive effects on savings and asset accumulation for children's future development. Further research is required to test long-term cost effectiveness of CDAs. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the Center for Social Development at the University at Buffalo.

  • Individual Author: Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Lee, Jung-Sook; Greeson, Johanna K. P.; Han, Chang-Keun; Yeo, Yeong H.; Irish, Kate
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    For low-income families, homeownership represents an important strategy for promoting long-term social and economic development. Individual Development Account (IDA) programs facilitate saving toward assets such as a home through matching, financial education, and case management. Using longitudinal experimental data from the American Dream demonstration, this study examines the impact of IDA participation on homeownership rates and on clearing old debts. Low-income participants were interviewed after 18 months (Wave 2) and after program completion at 48 months (Wave 3).

    Logistic regression results indicate that among those who were renters at baseline, IDA participation significantly increases the clearing of old debts at Wave 2 and homeownership rates at Wave 3. IDA participants with cleared debt activity had the highest probability of becoming homeowners at Wave 3 (32 percent), while those who were not IDA participants and did not have such activity had only a 9.6 percent probability. (author abstract)

    For low-income families, homeownership represents an important strategy for promoting long-term social and economic development. Individual Development Account (IDA) programs facilitate saving toward assets such as a home through matching, financial education, and case management. Using longitudinal experimental data from the American Dream demonstration, this study examines the impact of IDA participation on homeownership rates and on clearing old debts. Low-income participants were interviewed after 18 months (Wave 2) and after program completion at 48 months (Wave 3).

    Logistic regression results indicate that among those who were renters at baseline, IDA participation significantly increases the clearing of old debts at Wave 2 and homeownership rates at Wave 3. IDA participants with cleared debt activity had the highest probability of becoming homeowners at Wave 3 (32 percent), while those who were not IDA participants and did not have such activity had only a 9.6 percent probability. (author abstract)

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