Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Washington, Thomas A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2002

    Current programs serving the homeless population use the systems approach, focusing on the person-in-the situation. These programs, which are known as transitional housing programs, seek to empower individuals through comprehensive services, such as education, job development, leadership skills, resources, and referrals. This study evaluated the comprehensive services offered at a transitional housing program through the eyes of former residents. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 successful participants of the program. Analysis of the interview data suggested that the formal and informal services offered at Estival Place empowered the participants by offering life skills classes, resources and referrals, and counseling. Implications for social work practice are discussed. (author abstract)

    Current programs serving the homeless population use the systems approach, focusing on the person-in-the situation. These programs, which are known as transitional housing programs, seek to empower individuals through comprehensive services, such as education, job development, leadership skills, resources, and referrals. This study evaluated the comprehensive services offered at a transitional housing program through the eyes of former residents. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 successful participants of the program. Analysis of the interview data suggested that the formal and informal services offered at Estival Place empowered the participants by offering life skills classes, resources and referrals, and counseling. Implications for social work practice are discussed. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Marr, Matthew D.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has found that Section 8 voucher recipients are often unable to secure apartments outside of high-poverty areas in tight urban rental markets. However, intensive housing placement services greatly improve the success and mobility of voucher holders. Drawing on ethnographic research in the housing placement department of a private, nonprofit community-based organization, I first describe how fundamental problems in implementing the public subsidy program in a tight private rental market generate apprehension among landlords and voucher recipients that can prevent the successful use of vouchers. Second, I demonstrate how housing placement specialists can dispel and overcome this apprehension through a variety of tactics that require extensive soft skills and a deep commitment to the mission of housing poor families. These findings provide support for the increased use of housing placement services to improve success and mobility rates for Section 8 vouchers. (author abstract)

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has found that Section 8 voucher recipients are often unable to secure apartments outside of high-poverty areas in tight urban rental markets. However, intensive housing placement services greatly improve the success and mobility of voucher holders. Drawing on ethnographic research in the housing placement department of a private, nonprofit community-based organization, I first describe how fundamental problems in implementing the public subsidy program in a tight private rental market generate apprehension among landlords and voucher recipients that can prevent the successful use of vouchers. Second, I demonstrate how housing placement specialists can dispel and overcome this apprehension through a variety of tactics that require extensive soft skills and a deep commitment to the mission of housing poor families. These findings provide support for the increased use of housing placement services to improve success and mobility rates for Section 8 vouchers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ong, Paul M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article, Report
    Year: 2002

    This study examines the role of car ownership in facilitating employment among recipients under the current welfare-to-work law. Because of a potential problem with simultaneity, the analysis uses predicted car ownership constructed from two instrumental variables, insurance premiums and population density for car ownership. The data come from a 1999-2000 survey of TANF recipients in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The empirical results show a significant independent contribution of car ownership on employment. The presence of an predicted ownership is associated with a 9 percentage point increase in the odds of being employed. Moreover, the results indicate that lowering insurance premiums by $100 can increase the odds of employment by 4 percentage points. (author abstract)

    This study examines the role of car ownership in facilitating employment among recipients under the current welfare-to-work law. Because of a potential problem with simultaneity, the analysis uses predicted car ownership constructed from two instrumental variables, insurance premiums and population density for car ownership. The data come from a 1999-2000 survey of TANF recipients in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The empirical results show a significant independent contribution of car ownership on employment. The presence of an predicted ownership is associated with a 9 percentage point increase in the odds of being employed. Moreover, the results indicate that lowering insurance premiums by $100 can increase the odds of employment by 4 percentage points. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Clark, William A.V.; Wang, Wenfei W.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    There is an implicit, and often explicit, policy view that cities need to provide increased public transit and access to that transportation for low-income and immigrant populations. In this perspective, only by providing increased access to public transit will society overcome the travel problems of these disadvantaged populations. Still, studies of mostly welfare populations have suggested that while public transportation is not unimportant, the automobile is a critical factor in moving from welfare to work. This study extends that work by examining the job access behavior of both the low-income population in general and the foreign-born population in particular. It examines the questions: Does car ownership increase the low-income population's access to employment? And what is the financial benefit for the low-income working population by owning a car? We show that the car provides a real gain for low income and foreign-born populations, but that the gain is not without a potentially wider problem—many poor and foreign-born populations use cars without the full societal costs...

    There is an implicit, and often explicit, policy view that cities need to provide increased public transit and access to that transportation for low-income and immigrant populations. In this perspective, only by providing increased access to public transit will society overcome the travel problems of these disadvantaged populations. Still, studies of mostly welfare populations have suggested that while public transportation is not unimportant, the automobile is a critical factor in moving from welfare to work. This study extends that work by examining the job access behavior of both the low-income population in general and the foreign-born population in particular. It examines the questions: Does car ownership increase the low-income population's access to employment? And what is the financial benefit for the low-income working population by owning a car? We show that the car provides a real gain for low income and foreign-born populations, but that the gain is not without a potentially wider problem—many poor and foreign-born populations use cars without the full societal costs because large proportions of these populations do not carry automobile insurance. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cervero, Robert; Landis, John; Onesimo Sandoval, J.S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    Using a rich panel of data on welfare recipients in Alameda, Los Angeles, and San Joaquin Counties in California, this paper examined the relationship between transportation, human capital, family obstacles, socioeconomic constraints, and employment outcomes for welfare recipients. This paper reports the multinomial logit results that test the spatial mismatch hypothesis, car ownership thesis, and human capital thesis for employment outcome for welfare recipients. First, with respect to the spatial mismatch hypothesis, our work suggests that spatial proximity to jobs was not particularly important in explaining employment outcomes. Second, the private mobility measures, especially car ownership, were found to be significant predictors of employment and exiting welfare. Finally, human capital played an important role for welfare mothers who obtained a job and left the welfare system, and the number of children and their physical and mental challenges were significant barriers to economic self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

    Using a rich panel of data on welfare recipients in Alameda, Los Angeles, and San Joaquin Counties in California, this paper examined the relationship between transportation, human capital, family obstacles, socioeconomic constraints, and employment outcomes for welfare recipients. This paper reports the multinomial logit results that test the spatial mismatch hypothesis, car ownership thesis, and human capital thesis for employment outcome for welfare recipients. First, with respect to the spatial mismatch hypothesis, our work suggests that spatial proximity to jobs was not particularly important in explaining employment outcomes. Second, the private mobility measures, especially car ownership, were found to be significant predictors of employment and exiting welfare. Finally, human capital played an important role for welfare mothers who obtained a job and left the welfare system, and the number of children and their physical and mental challenges were significant barriers to economic self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2000 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations