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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Golden, Olivia; Loprest, Pamela J. ; Adams, Gina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Golden, Olivia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In 2011, nine states—Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, South Carolina, and Rhode Island—received one-year planning grants under the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative to help them improve their systems for connecting low-income families to work support benefits. These planning grants were the first phase of WSS, a multiyear initiative to help selected states test and implement more effective and integrated approaches to delivering key work supports, including health coverage, nutrition benefits, and child care subsidies.

    The idea behind the project was that more streamlined and modernized processes could help low-income working families get and keep the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In turn, having the full package of benefits can stabilize families’ work lives and promote children’s health and well-being (Mills, Compton, and Golden 2011). Streamlining benefit delivery can also reduce the burden on state workers by further stretching states’ scarce administrative dollars and potentially...

    In 2011, nine states—Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, South Carolina, and Rhode Island—received one-year planning grants under the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative to help them improve their systems for connecting low-income families to work support benefits. These planning grants were the first phase of WSS, a multiyear initiative to help selected states test and implement more effective and integrated approaches to delivering key work supports, including health coverage, nutrition benefits, and child care subsidies.

    The idea behind the project was that more streamlined and modernized processes could help low-income working families get and keep the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In turn, having the full package of benefits can stabilize families’ work lives and promote children’s health and well-being (Mills, Compton, and Golden 2011). Streamlining benefit delivery can also reduce the burden on state workers by further stretching states’ scarce administrative dollars and potentially saving money.

    This report summarizes the lessons learned from the nine planning grant states, just one year into a four-year project. Future reports from the evaluation will follow the six states that continued into the three-year implementation phase (Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, North Carolina, Rhode Island, and South Carolina). We will document their implementation experiences and track results for families and for state administrative efficiency. In a subset of the states, the evaluation team will also analyze the impact WSS had on those results. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Edelhoch, Marilyn; Liu, Qiduan; Martin, Linda S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    Much attention has focused on families receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) benefits. Yet, less attention has been given to TANF cases that do not have an adult receiving assistance. Such "child-only" cases are generally exempt from federal and state requirements. In South Carolina, cases may be child-only if the parents receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or if the care-givers are relatives who do not receive cash assistance. (author abstract)

    Much attention has focused on families receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) benefits. Yet, less attention has been given to TANF cases that do not have an adult receiving assistance. Such "child-only" cases are generally exempt from federal and state requirements. In South Carolina, cases may be child-only if the parents receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or if the care-givers are relatives who do not receive cash assistance. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wheaton, Laura; Durham, Christin; Loprest, Pamela J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report describes work in Connecticut, Indiana, South Carolina, and Wisconsin to link Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) with other administrative data for operational and research purposes. The report describes the agencies and organizations involved, each state’s planning process, goals, and achievements, and the Urban Institute’s role as technical assistance contractor. All four states proposed linkages with the National Directory of New Hires (NDNH), but two states dropped these plans after learning of costs and limitations of the NDNH. The report concludes with recommendations for supporting future state efforts and for facilitating research use of the NDNH. (author abstract)

    This report describes work in Connecticut, Indiana, South Carolina, and Wisconsin to link Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) with other administrative data for operational and research purposes. The report describes the agencies and organizations involved, each state’s planning process, goals, and achievements, and the Urban Institute’s role as technical assistance contractor. All four states proposed linkages with the National Directory of New Hires (NDNH), but two states dropped these plans after learning of costs and limitations of the NDNH. The report concludes with recommendations for supporting future state efforts and for facilitating research use of the NDNH. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ratliff, Pamela P.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2012

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) non-custodial, low-income fathers' level of knowledge of child support enforcement policy, procedures, and rules; (b) their level of involvement in the family court system; and (c) the relationship between non-custodial, low-income fathers' knowledge of the procedures of the child support enforcement system and compliance with court child support orders. The investigation employed a descriptive-survey research design. The sample (n = 25) was randomly selected from a population of noncustodial, low-income fathers enrolled in a welfare-to-work training project in South Carolina. Data were collected from the sample using a valid and reliable survey titled Knowledge of Child Support Enforcement Policy and Procedures or KCSEPP. Data were analyzed to respond to seven quantitative research questions. The data showed that the level of knowledge fathers had about child support policies and procedures was generally low; and their level of involvement in the family court system, due to non-compliance with child support orders, revealed a high...

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) non-custodial, low-income fathers' level of knowledge of child support enforcement policy, procedures, and rules; (b) their level of involvement in the family court system; and (c) the relationship between non-custodial, low-income fathers' knowledge of the procedures of the child support enforcement system and compliance with court child support orders. The investigation employed a descriptive-survey research design. The sample (n = 25) was randomly selected from a population of noncustodial, low-income fathers enrolled in a welfare-to-work training project in South Carolina. Data were collected from the sample using a valid and reliable survey titled Knowledge of Child Support Enforcement Policy and Procedures or KCSEPP. Data were analyzed to respond to seven quantitative research questions. The data showed that the level of knowledge fathers had about child support policies and procedures was generally low; and their level of involvement in the family court system, due to non-compliance with child support orders, revealed a high degree of negative involvement. Results also revealed that there was no difference in the level of knowledge of child support enforcement policy and procedures for fathers who were in compliance with child support orders and those who were not in compliance. Ultimately, the study confirmed that educating fathers about child support policy and procedures is a strategy that should be explored further for its usefulness in informing non-custodial, low-income fathers' decision making regarding legal and financial obligations to their children. (author abstract)

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