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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2013

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg.  During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging...

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg.  During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging Scholar, and was featured April through June, 2013. Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg is a Senior Researcher at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago.

    An interactive question and answer session followed the formal presentation and this document provides a record of that dialogue. The recording from the Webinar as well as more information on Dr. Weigensberg and her work can be found here. The transcript Dr. Weigensberg’s Webinar can be found here. Dr. Weigensberg's PowerPoint from the Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2013

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg. During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging...

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg. During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging Scholar, and was featured April through June, 2013. Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg is a Senior Researcher at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago.

    More information on Dr. Weigensberg and her work can be found here. Dr. Weigensberg’s PowerPoint from the Webinar can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from Dr. Weigensberg’s Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Reed, Monique; Dancy, Barbara; Holm, Karyn; Wilbur, JoEllen; Fogg, Louis
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    African American (AA) girls aged 10–12 living in urban communities designated as food deserts have a significantly greater prevalence of overweight and obesity than girls that age in the general population. The purpose of our study was (a) to examine the agreement in nutritional intake between AA girls aged 10–12 and their mothers and (b) to determine if the girls’ weight categories were associated with their or their mothers demographic characteristics, eating behaviors, nutritional intake, and health problem. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in predominantly low-income AA communities in Chicago. Forty-three dyads of early adolescent AA girls and their mothers responded to food frequency and eating habits questionnaires. There was a strong and significant correlation between mother’s and daughter’s kilocalories consumed (r = .61). Our study suggests that interventions aimed at improving eating behaviors in early adolescent AA girls should include their mothers. (author abstract)

    African American (AA) girls aged 10–12 living in urban communities designated as food deserts have a significantly greater prevalence of overweight and obesity than girls that age in the general population. The purpose of our study was (a) to examine the agreement in nutritional intake between AA girls aged 10–12 and their mothers and (b) to determine if the girls’ weight categories were associated with their or their mothers demographic characteristics, eating behaviors, nutritional intake, and health problem. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in predominantly low-income AA communities in Chicago. Forty-three dyads of early adolescent AA girls and their mothers responded to food frequency and eating habits questionnaires. There was a strong and significant correlation between mother’s and daughter’s kilocalories consumed (r = .61). Our study suggests that interventions aimed at improving eating behaviors in early adolescent AA girls should include their mothers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: DeLuca, Stefanie; Duncan, Greg J.; Keels, Micere; Mendenhall, Ruby
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    The Gautreaux program was one of the first major residential mobility programs in the United States, providing low-income black families from public housing with opportunities to relocate to more affluent white neighborhoods in the Chicago suburbs and in other city neighborhoods. This paper reviews the most recent research on the Gautreaux families, which uses long-term administrative data to examine the effects of placement neighborhoods on the economic and social outcomes of mothers and children. We find that both Gautreaux mothers and their now-grown children were remarkably successful at maintaining the affluence and safety of their placement neighborhoods. As to the long-run economic independence of the mothers themselves, however, the new research fails to confirm the suburban advantages found in past Gautreaux research, although it does show that these outcomes were worst in the most racially segregated placement neighborhoods. With regard to the criminal records of Gautreaux children, it is found that suburban placement helped boys but not girls. Based on these results,...

    The Gautreaux program was one of the first major residential mobility programs in the United States, providing low-income black families from public housing with opportunities to relocate to more affluent white neighborhoods in the Chicago suburbs and in other city neighborhoods. This paper reviews the most recent research on the Gautreaux families, which uses long-term administrative data to examine the effects of placement neighborhoods on the economic and social outcomes of mothers and children. We find that both Gautreaux mothers and their now-grown children were remarkably successful at maintaining the affluence and safety of their placement neighborhoods. As to the long-run economic independence of the mothers themselves, however, the new research fails to confirm the suburban advantages found in past Gautreaux research, although it does show that these outcomes were worst in the most racially segregated placement neighborhoods. With regard to the criminal records of Gautreaux children, it is found that suburban placement helped boys but not girls. Based on these results, we review possible new directions for successful mobility programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mendenhall, Ruby
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    This study examines how perceptions of shifts in the U.S. political economy such as those associated with the Great Migration(s), the Civil Rights Movement, and various housing policies influenced the lives of three generations of African American families and children. This study looks at the experiences of families living in Chicago, Illinois who participated in the Gautreaux Assisted Housing Program, which was a direct result of the Civil Rights Movement. A qualitative analysis is employed that analyzes the perceptions of Gautreaux participants (N=25) about how changes in the U.S. political economy affect their life course development and the life courses of their parents (N=50) and children (N=72). Added to the perceptions of Gautreaux participants is an intergenerational analysis of educational achievement and occupational attainment in the context of a changing U.S. political economy from the Jim Crow era to the post-Civil Rights era. The findings suggest that in many cases participants perceived expanding opportunities but also recognized the persistence of structural...

    This study examines how perceptions of shifts in the U.S. political economy such as those associated with the Great Migration(s), the Civil Rights Movement, and various housing policies influenced the lives of three generations of African American families and children. This study looks at the experiences of families living in Chicago, Illinois who participated in the Gautreaux Assisted Housing Program, which was a direct result of the Civil Rights Movement. A qualitative analysis is employed that analyzes the perceptions of Gautreaux participants (N=25) about how changes in the U.S. political economy affect their life course development and the life courses of their parents (N=50) and children (N=72). Added to the perceptions of Gautreaux participants is an intergenerational analysis of educational achievement and occupational attainment in the context of a changing U.S. political economy from the Jim Crow era to the post-Civil Rights era. The findings suggest that in many cases participants perceived expanding opportunities but also recognized the persistence of structural constraints. They identified several structural changes that they believed influenced their families’ educational and occupational opportunities: industrial jobs in the North, civil rights protests by African Americans against employment and housing discrimination (and the resulting policies like “affirmative action”), as well as increased government funding for job training and education. The intergenerational analysis of educational and occupational achievement revealed that each Gautreaux generation has higher rates of college attendance and post-high school training, as well as a greater range of occupations. I argue that the interplay between changing structural forces and bundled acts of resistance over the three generations created pathways that significantly improved life course development within and across the generations. (Author abstract)

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