Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wiedrich, Kasey; Griffin, Kate; Chilton, Mariana; Lehman, Gretchen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    Studies show that low-income families are more likely to be unbanked and “underbanked” than families with higher earnings. Lacking a bank account or depending on alternative financial services leads to significant financial barriers for low-income families that hinder economic growth and social mobility. This session will evaluate strategies that local and state human services agencies are testing to equip TANF recipients with the financial knowledge and resources they need to overcome barriers to financial security, including ACF’s Asset Initiative Partnership. Gretchen Lehman (Administration for Children and Families) will moderate this session.

    • Financial Counseling and Financial Access for the Financially Vulnerable

    Kasey Wiedrich (Corporation for Enterprise Development)

    The presentation examines financial management strategies among low-income families.  Two research studies are described: Children's HealthWatch and Witnesses to Hunger.

    • Building Economic Self-Sufficiency of TANF Clients Through Financial Education and Matched Savings

    ...

    Studies show that low-income families are more likely to be unbanked and “underbanked” than families with higher earnings. Lacking a bank account or depending on alternative financial services leads to significant financial barriers for low-income families that hinder economic growth and social mobility. This session will evaluate strategies that local and state human services agencies are testing to equip TANF recipients with the financial knowledge and resources they need to overcome barriers to financial security, including ACF’s Asset Initiative Partnership. Gretchen Lehman (Administration for Children and Families) will moderate this session.

    • Financial Counseling and Financial Access for the Financially Vulnerable

    Kasey Wiedrich (Corporation for Enterprise Development)

    The presentation examines financial management strategies among low-income families.  Two research studies are described: Children's HealthWatch and Witnesses to Hunger.

    • Building Economic Self-Sufficiency of TANF Clients Through Financial Education and Matched Savings

    Kate Griffin (Corporation for Enterprise Development)

    The presentation describes data from a financial education program for TANF recipients that provides training in budgeting and credit management.  The pilot was started in July 2013 with the Utah Department of Workforce Services.

    • Financial Management Strategies of TANF and SNAP Recipients: Lessons for Policy Makers and Administrators

    Mariana Chilton (Drexel University)

    The presentation describes a completed research project that looks at the impact of the AFCO financial counseling program for families leaving TANF and entering into a work-ready context.

    These presentations were given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

  • Individual Author: Ovwigho, Pamela Caudill; Leavitt, Katharine L.; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    Recent research has documented that those leaving TANF in the later years of reform face more challenges to leaving welfare for work and may not be faring as well as earlier exiters. The present study utilizes data from a large-scale, longitudinal study of TANF leavers to examine risk factors for child maltreatment, particularly focusing on the question of higher risk for later leavers. The sample, from Maryland’s Life After Welfare study, includes 17,441 children from 8,900 families who exited TANF between October 1996 and March 2001. Of these children, 7.3% (n = 1,269) experienced a child protective services investigation during the first year after exit, in which abuse or neglect was substantiated or indicated. Discrete time event history analysis revealed several significant predictors of child abuse and neglect, with child welfare history emerging as the strongest predictor. Moreover, we find that risk of a substantiated CPS report is higher for later leaving families, even after controlling for family characteristics and post-exit experiences. These results suggest that...

    Recent research has documented that those leaving TANF in the later years of reform face more challenges to leaving welfare for work and may not be faring as well as earlier exiters. The present study utilizes data from a large-scale, longitudinal study of TANF leavers to examine risk factors for child maltreatment, particularly focusing on the question of higher risk for later leavers. The sample, from Maryland’s Life After Welfare study, includes 17,441 children from 8,900 families who exited TANF between October 1996 and March 2001. Of these children, 7.3% (n = 1,269) experienced a child protective services investigation during the first year after exit, in which abuse or neglect was substantiated or indicated. Discrete time event history analysis revealed several significant predictors of child abuse and neglect, with child welfare history emerging as the strongest predictor. Moreover, we find that risk of a substantiated CPS report is higher for later leaving families, even after controlling for family characteristics and post-exit experiences. These results suggest that policy makers and program managers may need to consider providing extra support to families with a child welfare history who are exiting the rolls in the later years of reform. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a report published by the University of Maryland School of Social Work.

  • Individual Author: Passarella, Letitia; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The goal of this project was to determine whether clients who self-assess their health as fair or poor are more likely to have barriers than those who rate their health as excellent, very good, or good; and if this was true, what type of barriers do these clients have and what is the effect on welfare use and employment. We found that clients with a fair or poor health rating had more barriers, received more months of cash assistance, were less likely to work, and earned less than those with a more positive assessment of their health. (author abstract)

    The goal of this project was to determine whether clients who self-assess their health as fair or poor are more likely to have barriers than those who rate their health as excellent, very good, or good; and if this was true, what type of barriers do these clients have and what is the effect on welfare use and employment. We found that clients with a fair or poor health rating had more barriers, received more months of cash assistance, were less likely to work, and earned less than those with a more positive assessment of their health. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Passarella, Letitia; Born, Catherine; Roll, Susan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This report examines the use of child care subsidies among newly-approved TANF families. Although the rate of subsidy use was low (38.1%), we found that employment participation was higher for families that received a child care subsidy during the three-year follow-up period. (author abstract)

    This report examines the use of child care subsidies among newly-approved TANF families. Although the rate of subsidy use was low (38.1%), we found that employment participation was higher for families that received a child care subsidy during the three-year follow-up period. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nicoli, Lisa Thiebaud; Passarella, Letitia Logan; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report provides a profile of the cases that were receiving Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA, Maryland’s TANF program) in October 2011. Additionally, the authors document trends in the caseload throughout the Great Recession and its sluggish recovery. (author abstract)

    This report provides a profile of the cases that were receiving Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA, Maryland’s TANF program) in October 2011. Additionally, the authors document trends in the caseload throughout the Great Recession and its sluggish recovery. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1995 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations