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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Bond, David
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    Employer engagement in Adult Career Pathways (ACP) programs can strengthen the efforts of adult educators to help learners attain secondary credentials, transition to  postsecondary programs, achieve industry credentials, and secure family-sustaining employment. Whether employer contributions result in the development of workplace  relevant curriculum, career awareness activities, work-based  learning opportunities, or in-kind support for equipment and other resources, employer engagement is essential for ACP programs. Employers can help ensure programs are responsive to the needs of local industry, while providing adult learners the relevant workplace context and foundational skills they must master to succeed along a career pathway.  Interfacing with adult learners in the classroom on a daily basis, teachers are well positioned to work with employers toward the goal of translating workplace skills into learning  objectives that can be taught within a career pathways context. This brief offers practical strategies on engaging  employers and building business-education...

    Employer engagement in Adult Career Pathways (ACP) programs can strengthen the efforts of adult educators to help learners attain secondary credentials, transition to  postsecondary programs, achieve industry credentials, and secure family-sustaining employment. Whether employer contributions result in the development of workplace  relevant curriculum, career awareness activities, work-based  learning opportunities, or in-kind support for equipment and other resources, employer engagement is essential for ACP programs. Employers can help ensure programs are responsive to the needs of local industry, while providing adult learners the relevant workplace context and foundational skills they must master to succeed along a career pathway.  Interfacing with adult learners in the classroom on a daily basis, teachers are well positioned to work with employers toward the goal of translating workplace skills into learning  objectives that can be taught within a career pathways context. This brief offers practical strategies on engaging  employers and building business-education partnerships to support ACP programs, and highlights promising examples from adult education providers in three states. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Selekman, Rebekah; Holcomb, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The EMPOWERED study, conducted on behalf of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines the use of performance measures, work requirements, and child support cooperation requirements across human services programs. This issue brief examines the use of child support cooperation requirements in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program and child care subsidy programs funded under the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF). (Author summary)

    The EMPOWERED study, conducted on behalf of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines the use of performance measures, work requirements, and child support cooperation requirements across human services programs. This issue brief examines the use of child support cooperation requirements in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program and child care subsidy programs funded under the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF). (Author summary)

  • Individual Author: Duncan, Greg J.; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Child Care Research Network
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care compared 3 statistical methods that adjust for family selection bias to test whether child care type and quality relate to cognitive and academic skills. The methods included: multiple regression models of 54-month outcomes, change models of differences in 24- and 54-month outcomes, and residualized change models of 54-month outcomes adjusting for the 24-month outcome. The study was unable to establish empirically which model best adjusted for selection and omitted-variable bias. Nevertheless, results suggested that child care quality predicted cognitive outcomes at 54 months, with effect sizes of .04 to .08 for both infant and preschool ages. Center care during preschool years also predicted outcomes across all models. (Author abstract)

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care compared 3 statistical methods that adjust for family selection bias to test whether child care type and quality relate to cognitive and academic skills. The methods included: multiple regression models of 54-month outcomes, change models of differences in 24- and 54-month outcomes, and residualized change models of 54-month outcomes adjusting for the 24-month outcome. The study was unable to establish empirically which model best adjusted for selection and omitted-variable bias. Nevertheless, results suggested that child care quality predicted cognitive outcomes at 54 months, with effect sizes of .04 to .08 for both infant and preschool ages. Center care during preschool years also predicted outcomes across all models. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Berlin, Lisa J.; Kisker, Ellen Eliason; Love, John M.; Raikes, Helen; Boller, Kimberly ; Paulsell, Diane; Rosenberg, Linda; Coolahan, Kathleen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This volume and its companion volumes are the first of two reports designed to share the experiences of the 17 Early Head Start research programs with others. The first report focuses on the programs early in their implementation (fall 1997), approximately two years after they were funded and one year after they began serving families. Volume I examines the characteristics and experiences of the 17 research programs from a cross-site perspective, focusing on the similarities and differences among the programs in fall 1997. Volume III analyzes the levels of program implementation achieved by the programs across program areas in fall 1997. Following a brief description of Early Head Start and the national evaluation, this volume presents in-depth profiles of each of the research programs in fall 1997. (Edited author introduction)

     

    This volume and its companion volumes are the first of two reports designed to share the experiences of the 17 Early Head Start research programs with others. The first report focuses on the programs early in their implementation (fall 1997), approximately two years after they were funded and one year after they began serving families. Volume I examines the characteristics and experiences of the 17 research programs from a cross-site perspective, focusing on the similarities and differences among the programs in fall 1997. Volume III analyzes the levels of program implementation achieved by the programs across program areas in fall 1997. Following a brief description of Early Head Start and the national evaluation, this volume presents in-depth profiles of each of the research programs in fall 1997. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Shantz, Kathryn; Fox, Liana E.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Policy leaders look to quality data and statistics to help inform and guide programmatic decisions. As a result, assessing the quality and validity of major household surveys in capturing accurate program participation is essential. One method for evaluating survey quality is to compare self-reported program participation in surveys to administrative records from the program itself. In this paper, we are interested in understanding two issues. First, how closely do self-reported Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participation and benefit amounts in the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (CPS ASEC), as well as SNAP and TANF participation and benefit amounts corrected for underreporting with the Transfer Income Model, version 3 (TRIM3), align with state-level administrative records? We find that 43.0 percent of households who receive SNAP according to administrative records do not report receipt in the CPS ASEC and 62.4 percent of households who receive TANF according to administrative...

    Policy leaders look to quality data and statistics to help inform and guide programmatic decisions. As a result, assessing the quality and validity of major household surveys in capturing accurate program participation is essential. One method for evaluating survey quality is to compare self-reported program participation in surveys to administrative records from the program itself. In this paper, we are interested in understanding two issues. First, how closely do self-reported Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participation and benefit amounts in the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (CPS ASEC), as well as SNAP and TANF participation and benefit amounts corrected for underreporting with the Transfer Income Model, version 3 (TRIM3), align with state-level administrative records? We find that 43.0 percent of households who receive SNAP according to administrative records do not report receipt in the CPS ASEC and 62.4 percent of households who receive TANF according to administrative records do not report receipt in the CPS ASEC. Second, how does replacing values from the CPS ASEC with TRIM3 values or administrative records for SNAP and TANF change poverty measurement in the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM)? We found that factoring in both SNAP and TANF benefits, the CPS ASEC overestimates SPM rates by 0.4 percent and TRIM3 underestimates SPM rates by 0.4 percent, both compared to administrative records. (Author abstract)

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