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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Slack, Tim; Myers, Candice A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    This study examines the extent to which geographic variation in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation is explained by place-based factors, with special attention to the case of the three poorest regions of the United States: Central Appalachia, the Texas Borderland, and the Lower Mississippi Delta. We use descriptive statistics and regression models to assess the prevalence and correlates of county-level FSP participation circa 2005. Our findings show that the economic distress that has long characterized Appalachia, the Borderland, and the Delta clearly translates into greater reliance on the FSP relative to other areas of the country. State-level effects and local-level variations in poverty, labor market conditions, population structure, human capital, and residential context explain much of this reality. Yet, even after taking all of these factors into account, these regional geographies remain home to particularly high FSP participation. Our findings underscore the importance of considering these regions as key cases of study in the stratification of American society and...

    This study examines the extent to which geographic variation in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation is explained by place-based factors, with special attention to the case of the three poorest regions of the United States: Central Appalachia, the Texas Borderland, and the Lower Mississippi Delta. We use descriptive statistics and regression models to assess the prevalence and correlates of county-level FSP participation circa 2005. Our findings show that the economic distress that has long characterized Appalachia, the Borderland, and the Delta clearly translates into greater reliance on the FSP relative to other areas of the country. State-level effects and local-level variations in poverty, labor market conditions, population structure, human capital, and residential context explain much of this reality. Yet, even after taking all of these factors into account, these regional geographies remain home to particularly high FSP participation. Our findings underscore the importance of considering these regions as key cases of study in the stratification of American society and hold a variety of implications for public policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rorem, Annie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly referred to as the Food Stamp Program, provides monthly subsidies specifically for the purchase of food. The value of the monthly benefit is calculated based on income and number of individuals living in the household.

    In this brief, we summarize facts about this program, provide a quick look at 2012 SNAP participation in Virginia, and review ways in which the program is changing. (author abstract)

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly referred to as the Food Stamp Program, provides monthly subsidies specifically for the purchase of food. The value of the monthly benefit is calculated based on income and number of individuals living in the household.

    In this brief, we summarize facts about this program, provide a quick look at 2012 SNAP participation in Virginia, and review ways in which the program is changing. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mills, Gregory ; Vericker, Tracy; Lippold, Kye; Wheaton, Laura; Elkin, Sam; Koball, Heather
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    “Churning” in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is defined as when a household exits SNAP and then re-enters the program within 4 months. Churning is a policy concern due to the financial and administrative burden incurred by both SNAP households and State agencies that administer SNAP. This study explores the circumstances of churning in SNAP by determining the rates and patterns of churn, examining the causes of caseload churn, and calculating costs of churn to both participants and administering agencies in six States. (Author abstract)

    “Churning” in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is defined as when a household exits SNAP and then re-enters the program within 4 months. Churning is a policy concern due to the financial and administrative burden incurred by both SNAP households and State agencies that administer SNAP. This study explores the circumstances of churning in SNAP by determining the rates and patterns of churn, examining the causes of caseload churn, and calculating costs of churn to both participants and administering agencies in six States. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Selekman, Rebekah; Holcomb, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The EMPOWERED study, conducted on behalf of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines the use of performance measures, work requirements, and child support cooperation requirements across human services programs. This issue brief examines the use of child support cooperation requirements in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program and child care subsidy programs funded under the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF). (Author summary)

    The EMPOWERED study, conducted on behalf of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines the use of performance measures, work requirements, and child support cooperation requirements across human services programs. This issue brief examines the use of child support cooperation requirements in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program and child care subsidy programs funded under the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF). (Author summary)

  • Individual Author: Shantz, Kathryn; Fox, Liana E.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Policy leaders look to quality data and statistics to help inform and guide programmatic decisions. As a result, assessing the quality and validity of major household surveys in capturing accurate program participation is essential. One method for evaluating survey quality is to compare self-reported program participation in surveys to administrative records from the program itself. In this paper, we are interested in understanding two issues. First, how closely do self-reported Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participation and benefit amounts in the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (CPS ASEC), as well as SNAP and TANF participation and benefit amounts corrected for underreporting with the Transfer Income Model, version 3 (TRIM3), align with state-level administrative records? We find that 43.0 percent of households who receive SNAP according to administrative records do not report receipt in the CPS ASEC and 62.4 percent of households who receive TANF according to administrative...

    Policy leaders look to quality data and statistics to help inform and guide programmatic decisions. As a result, assessing the quality and validity of major household surveys in capturing accurate program participation is essential. One method for evaluating survey quality is to compare self-reported program participation in surveys to administrative records from the program itself. In this paper, we are interested in understanding two issues. First, how closely do self-reported Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participation and benefit amounts in the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement (CPS ASEC), as well as SNAP and TANF participation and benefit amounts corrected for underreporting with the Transfer Income Model, version 3 (TRIM3), align with state-level administrative records? We find that 43.0 percent of households who receive SNAP according to administrative records do not report receipt in the CPS ASEC and 62.4 percent of households who receive TANF according to administrative records do not report receipt in the CPS ASEC. Second, how does replacing values from the CPS ASEC with TRIM3 values or administrative records for SNAP and TANF change poverty measurement in the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM)? We found that factoring in both SNAP and TANF benefits, the CPS ASEC overestimates SPM rates by 0.4 percent and TRIM3 underestimates SPM rates by 0.4 percent, both compared to administrative records. (Author abstract)

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