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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Trenholm, Christopher; Devaney, Barbara; Fortson, Ken; Quay, Lisa; Wheeler, Justin; Clark, Melissa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    The enactment of Title V, Section 510 of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 significantly increased the funding and prominence of abstinence education as an approach to promote sexual abstinence and healthy teen behavior.  Since fiscal year 1998, the Title V, Section 510 program has allocated $50 million annually in federal funding for programs that teach abstinence from sexual activity outside of marriage as the expected standard for school-age children.  Under the matching block grant program administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), states must match this federal funding at 75 percent, resulting in a total of $87.5 million annually for Title V, Section 510 abstinence education programs.  All programs receiving Title V, Section 510 abstinence education funding must comply with the “A-H” definition of abstinence education.

    In the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Congress authorized a scientific evaluation of the Title V, Section 510 Abstinence Education Program.  This report presents final results from a...

    The enactment of Title V, Section 510 of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 significantly increased the funding and prominence of abstinence education as an approach to promote sexual abstinence and healthy teen behavior.  Since fiscal year 1998, the Title V, Section 510 program has allocated $50 million annually in federal funding for programs that teach abstinence from sexual activity outside of marriage as the expected standard for school-age children.  Under the matching block grant program administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), states must match this federal funding at 75 percent, resulting in a total of $87.5 million annually for Title V, Section 510 abstinence education programs.  All programs receiving Title V, Section 510 abstinence education funding must comply with the “A-H” definition of abstinence education.

    In the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Congress authorized a scientific evaluation of the Title V, Section 510 Abstinence Education Program.  This report presents final results from a multi-year, experimentally-based impact study conducted as part of this evaluation.  It focuses on four selected Title V, Section 510 abstinence education programs:  (1) My Choice, My Future! in Powhatan, Virginia; (2) ReCapturing the Vision in Miami, Florida; (3) Families United to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (FUPTP) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and (4) Teens in Control in Clarksdale, Mississippi.  Based on follow-up data collected from youth four to six years after study enrollment, the report presents the estimated program impacts on youth behavior, including sexual abstinence, risks of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and other related outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fein, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    The analysis of data from 3,719 students in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) evaluation highlights risk factors that disadvantaged students face in college success. The data indicates a strong relationship between college success and past educational experience; economic status; expected work hours; and expected part-time status. Findings also affirm the role of psycho-social factors - especially determination and confidence - in college success. Each program targeted and recruited different segments of the national population of disadvantaged adults. (author abstract)

    The analysis of data from 3,719 students in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) evaluation highlights risk factors that disadvantaged students face in college success. The data indicates a strong relationship between college success and past educational experience; economic status; expected work hours; and expected part-time status. Findings also affirm the role of psycho-social factors - especially determination and confidence - in college success. Each program targeted and recruited different segments of the national population of disadvantaged adults. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ashenfelter, Orley; Ashmore, David; Deschênes, Olivier
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    In this paper, we report the results of the only field test of which we are aware that uses randomized trials to measure whether stricter enforcement and verification of work search behavior alone decreases unemployment claims and benefits paid in the U.S. unemployment insurance (UI) program. These experiments, which were implemented in four U.S. sites in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Virginia and Tennessee, were designed to explicitly test claims based on nonexperimental data, summarized in Burgess and Kingston (An Incentives Approach to Improving the Unemployment Compensation System, W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, 1987), that a prime cause of overpayments is the failure of claimants to actively seek work. Our results provide no support for the view that the failure to actively search for work has been a cause of overpayment in the UI system. (Author abstract)

    In this paper, we report the results of the only field test of which we are aware that uses randomized trials to measure whether stricter enforcement and verification of work search behavior alone decreases unemployment claims and benefits paid in the U.S. unemployment insurance (UI) program. These experiments, which were implemented in four U.S. sites in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Virginia and Tennessee, were designed to explicitly test claims based on nonexperimental data, summarized in Burgess and Kingston (An Incentives Approach to Improving the Unemployment Compensation System, W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, 1987), that a prime cause of overpayments is the failure of claimants to actively seek work. Our results provide no support for the view that the failure to actively search for work has been a cause of overpayment in the UI system. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gupta, Sonam; Srinivasan, Mithuna
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop discusses the mixed-methods evaluation of the Virginia Employment Through Entrepreneurship Consortium (VETEC) Program, a Workforce Innovation Fund initiative that provided technical assistance and training (between July 2012 to July 2017) to WIA-WIOA-eligible adults starting their own businesses.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop discusses the mixed-methods evaluation of the Virginia Employment Through Entrepreneurship Consortium (VETEC) Program, a Workforce Innovation Fund initiative that provided technical assistance and training (between July 2012 to July 2017) to WIA-WIOA-eligible adults starting their own businesses.

  • Individual Author: Davis, Scott; Michaelides, Marios; Poe-Yamagata, Eileen; Davis, Andrew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In June 2008, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded Growing America Through Entrepreneurship (GATE II) grants to four states: Alabama, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Virginia. Alabama and North Carolina used the grants to provide self-employment training to dislocated workers in rural areas, while Minnesota and Virginia targeted older dislocated workers. This report presents the results of the evaluation of the GATE II program as implemented in the four grantee states. The evaluation objective was to address two key research questions: 

    • Was GATE II effective in improving the labor market outcomes of older dislocated workers and of rural dislocated workers?
    • Is providing self-employment training to older dislocated workers and rural dislocated workers interested in self-employment a viable policy tool for promoting their reemployment?

    The evaluation consisted of a random assignment impact study, to examine the impact of GATE II on participants' labor-market outcomes (e.g., self-employment, overall employment, self-employment earnings, and...

    In June 2008, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded Growing America Through Entrepreneurship (GATE II) grants to four states: Alabama, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Virginia. Alabama and North Carolina used the grants to provide self-employment training to dislocated workers in rural areas, while Minnesota and Virginia targeted older dislocated workers. This report presents the results of the evaluation of the GATE II program as implemented in the four grantee states. The evaluation objective was to address two key research questions: 

    • Was GATE II effective in improving the labor market outcomes of older dislocated workers and of rural dislocated workers?
    • Is providing self-employment training to older dislocated workers and rural dislocated workers interested in self-employment a viable policy tool for promoting their reemployment?

    The evaluation consisted of a random assignment impact study, to examine the impact of GATE II on participants' labor-market outcomes (e.g., self-employment, overall employment, self-employment earnings, and total earnings).

    While all four states planned to implement a random assignment design, only North Carolina and Virginia were able to do so. As a result, the impact evaluation results presented in this report include only the North Carolina and Virginia GATE II demonstrations. Findings derived from the implementation analysis covers all four states. The study analyzed participant data at program entry, post-program follow up, and administrative data to examine the answers to these questions stated above. The impact study of GATE II in North Carolina showed that the program was effective in assisting rural dislocated workers to start their own business following program entry, and be self-employed nearly three years after program entry. The impact study of the Virginia GATE II program, designed to help older dislocated workers, showed the program was effective in helping participants to start their own business after program entry, however there were no statistically significant impacts on self-employment or on employment overall. Additional analyses showed that the North Carolina GATE II program was more effective for younger workers (those less than 45 years old) and for workers with no prior self-employment experience. (Author abstract)

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