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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Slack, Tim; Myers, Candice A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    This study examines the extent to which geographic variation in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation is explained by place-based factors, with special attention to the case of the three poorest regions of the United States: Central Appalachia, the Texas Borderland, and the Lower Mississippi Delta. We use descriptive statistics and regression models to assess the prevalence and correlates of county-level FSP participation circa 2005. Our findings show that the economic distress that has long characterized Appalachia, the Borderland, and the Delta clearly translates into greater reliance on the FSP relative to other areas of the country. State-level effects and local-level variations in poverty, labor market conditions, population structure, human capital, and residential context explain much of this reality. Yet, even after taking all of these factors into account, these regional geographies remain home to particularly high FSP participation. Our findings underscore the importance of considering these regions as key cases of study in the stratification of American society and...

    This study examines the extent to which geographic variation in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation is explained by place-based factors, with special attention to the case of the three poorest regions of the United States: Central Appalachia, the Texas Borderland, and the Lower Mississippi Delta. We use descriptive statistics and regression models to assess the prevalence and correlates of county-level FSP participation circa 2005. Our findings show that the economic distress that has long characterized Appalachia, the Borderland, and the Delta clearly translates into greater reliance on the FSP relative to other areas of the country. State-level effects and local-level variations in poverty, labor market conditions, population structure, human capital, and residential context explain much of this reality. Yet, even after taking all of these factors into account, these regional geographies remain home to particularly high FSP participation. Our findings underscore the importance of considering these regions as key cases of study in the stratification of American society and hold a variety of implications for public policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wells, Kirstin; Thill, Jean-Claude
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Intrajurisdictional delivery of publicly provided services often results in observable service level differences that vary by spatial subunit (neighborhood). These variations are related to the sociodemographic characteristics of neighborhoods and have been hypothesized in prior literature to be the result of bias against or favoritism toward certain neighborhoods. Using path regression, this paper examines publicly provided bus service in four cities-Asheville, North Carolina; Charlotte, North Carolina; Mobile, Alabama; and Richmond, Virginia-to examine whether the socioeconomic character of a neighborhood is related to the share of municipal bus service it receives. With this analysis, we test an expanded version of Lineberry's underclass hypothesis. Specifically, do transit-dependent neighborhoods, or those with a high percentage of non-Caucasian, low-income, elderly, or student residents receive inferior bus service? Findings confirm prior research that both standard rules and bias are present in service delivery decisions. (author abstract)

    Intrajurisdictional delivery of publicly provided services often results in observable service level differences that vary by spatial subunit (neighborhood). These variations are related to the sociodemographic characteristics of neighborhoods and have been hypothesized in prior literature to be the result of bias against or favoritism toward certain neighborhoods. Using path regression, this paper examines publicly provided bus service in four cities-Asheville, North Carolina; Charlotte, North Carolina; Mobile, Alabama; and Richmond, Virginia-to examine whether the socioeconomic character of a neighborhood is related to the share of municipal bus service it receives. With this analysis, we test an expanded version of Lineberry's underclass hypothesis. Specifically, do transit-dependent neighborhoods, or those with a high percentage of non-Caucasian, low-income, elderly, or student residents receive inferior bus service? Findings confirm prior research that both standard rules and bias are present in service delivery decisions. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gordon, Anne; James-Burdumy, Susanne; Loeffler, Renee; Guglielmo, Barbara; Kuhns, Carole
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Most welfare recipients now face a time limit on their eligibility for cash assistance. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 instituted a five-year lifetime limit on federal cash assistance for most recipients and permitted states, under the new Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, to set shorter time limits. Some states, including Virginia, had already begun to implement time limits under waivers. Because time-limited welfare is relatively new, policymakers and the public at large have been concerned about what happens to families who lose TANF benefits because of time limits. Because time limit policies vary widely, this question can only be answered state by state.

    In 1995, Virginia, as part of its welfare reforms, instituted a 24-month time limit on benefits under the Virginia Initiative for Employment not Welfare (VIEW). To provide reliable information on time limit families and what happens to them after reaching the time limit, the Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) contracted with Virginia Tech...

    Most welfare recipients now face a time limit on their eligibility for cash assistance. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 instituted a five-year lifetime limit on federal cash assistance for most recipients and permitted states, under the new Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, to set shorter time limits. Some states, including Virginia, had already begun to implement time limits under waivers. Because time-limited welfare is relatively new, policymakers and the public at large have been concerned about what happens to families who lose TANF benefits because of time limits. Because time limit policies vary widely, this question can only be answered state by state.

    In 1995, Virginia, as part of its welfare reforms, instituted a 24-month time limit on benefits under the Virginia Initiative for Employment not Welfare (VIEW). To provide reliable information on time limit families and what happens to them after reaching the time limit, the Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS) contracted with Virginia Tech and Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR), for a longitudinal study. The study includes analysis of
    administrative data and of surveys of time limit families conducted about 6 and 18 months after their TANF cases closed.

    This is the second of four planned reports from the Virginia Time Limit Study. It presents 18 months of follow-up data on families whose TANF cases closed because of the time limit in early 1998 (cohort 1) and 6 months of follow-up data for a larger sample that includes families that reached the time limit in early 1998 and early 1999 (cohorts 1 and 2). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nguyen, Lynna
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2013

    Public transportation is a crucial part of the economic and social fabric of metropolitan areas. However, transit ridership has been decreasing over the decades, putting preference on the convenience of owning personal vehicles. It is seen that low income individuals are less likely to own a vehicle, thus becoming dependents on the public transportation system. However, there are few studies performed to analyze how effectively transit connects people and jobs within and across these metropolitan areas. And as a result, few federal and state programs related to transportation use factors like job accessibility via transit to make investment decisions. There are even fewer studies and programs relating to subsidizing vehicle ownership. Analyzing characteristics of low income individuals, understanding travel patterns, job availability, accessibility, and trip chaining are the methods used in this analysis to better understand the transportation needs of low income individuals. In addition, understanding the relationship that transit and personal vehicles play on the location of...

    Public transportation is a crucial part of the economic and social fabric of metropolitan areas. However, transit ridership has been decreasing over the decades, putting preference on the convenience of owning personal vehicles. It is seen that low income individuals are less likely to own a vehicle, thus becoming dependents on the public transportation system. However, there are few studies performed to analyze how effectively transit connects people and jobs within and across these metropolitan areas. And as a result, few federal and state programs related to transportation use factors like job accessibility via transit to make investment decisions. There are even fewer studies and programs relating to subsidizing vehicle ownership. Analyzing characteristics of low income individuals, understanding travel patterns, job availability, accessibility, and trip chaining are the methods used in this analysis to better understand the transportation needs of low income individuals. In addition, understanding the relationship that transit and personal vehicles play on the location of low income individuals and low income employment is crucial in creating and implementing programs that will improve and maintain transit and vehicle ownership options for metropolitan residents.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Long, David A.; Amendolia, Jean M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    Whether our country faces good or tough economic times, it is unacceptable for people to live on our streets, locked out of the possibility of a home and with profound challenges to finding or keeping a job. Our nation’s leaders agree. The Administration has set ending chronic homelessness as a national goal. The Congress has called for the development of 150,000 units of permanent supportive housing. The mayors of many of our largest cities cite supportive housing as a cornerstone in their plans to end homelessness. Several governors continue to dedicate scarce resources to supportive housing. Encouraged by the energy of these commitments, we must act to realize the goal and create supportive housing for at least 150,000 more people. And as this report—“Promoting Employment for Homeless People” —by Abt Associates demonstrates, integrating employment services into supportive housing not only benefits tenants, but is a cost effective investment that strengthens communities. (author preface)

     

    Whether our country faces good or tough economic times, it is unacceptable for people to live on our streets, locked out of the possibility of a home and with profound challenges to finding or keeping a job. Our nation’s leaders agree. The Administration has set ending chronic homelessness as a national goal. The Congress has called for the development of 150,000 units of permanent supportive housing. The mayors of many of our largest cities cite supportive housing as a cornerstone in their plans to end homelessness. Several governors continue to dedicate scarce resources to supportive housing. Encouraged by the energy of these commitments, we must act to realize the goal and create supportive housing for at least 150,000 more people. And as this report—“Promoting Employment for Homeless People” —by Abt Associates demonstrates, integrating employment services into supportive housing not only benefits tenants, but is a cost effective investment that strengthens communities. (author preface)

     

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