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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: McDaniel, Marla; Pergamit, Michael R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Young adults formerly in foster care are less likely to be employed or enrolled in college at age 19 than their same-age peers nationally, contributing to greater economic instability in their early adult years. Social workers, educators, and policymakers question whether youth are adequately prepared for work but have difficulty assessing their job preparedness. This brief, prepared by the Urban Institute, uses data collected as part of the Multi-Site Evaluation of Foster Youth Programs to examine: 1) how youth in foster care rate their preparedness for work at age 17, and 2) whether their assessments accurately predict education and employment two years later. The results indicated that a high sense of job preparedness, particularly when combined with high reading skills, was associated with more employment and college enrollment among young adults currently and formerly in foster care. (author abstract)

    Young adults formerly in foster care are less likely to be employed or enrolled in college at age 19 than their same-age peers nationally, contributing to greater economic instability in their early adult years. Social workers, educators, and policymakers question whether youth are adequately prepared for work but have difficulty assessing their job preparedness. This brief, prepared by the Urban Institute, uses data collected as part of the Multi-Site Evaluation of Foster Youth Programs to examine: 1) how youth in foster care rate their preparedness for work at age 17, and 2) whether their assessments accurately predict education and employment two years later. The results indicated that a high sense of job preparedness, particularly when combined with high reading skills, was associated with more employment and college enrollment among young adults currently and formerly in foster care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Love, John M.; Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Vogel, Cheri; Aikens, Nikki; Xue, Yange; Mabutas, Maricar; Carlson, Barbara Lepidus; Martin, Emily Sama; Paxton, Nora; Caspe, Margaret; Sprachman, Susan; Sonnenfeld, Kathy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    The focus of this report is the study’s second phase (fall 2007 and spring 2008). Phase 2 examined the quality, intensity, and overall implementation of LAUP programs (including classroom quality and teaching activities); documented the characteristics of the representative sample of teachers and the children and families enrolled in the programs; and measured children’s behavior and development across the full range of domains related to school readiness. We analyzed children’s fall-spring changes and examined the relationships between child and family characteristics and children’s school readiness outcomes. Because the sample was selected to be representative of all LAUP center-based programs, we can generalize the results to all LAUP center-based programs, classrooms, and children. We include a separate report on the PoP programs in Appendix E.

    After describing the characteristics of the representative sample of children and families, we report our findings related to the three broad questions this study addresses, which are described in more detail in Chapter II:...

    The focus of this report is the study’s second phase (fall 2007 and spring 2008). Phase 2 examined the quality, intensity, and overall implementation of LAUP programs (including classroom quality and teaching activities); documented the characteristics of the representative sample of teachers and the children and families enrolled in the programs; and measured children’s behavior and development across the full range of domains related to school readiness. We analyzed children’s fall-spring changes and examined the relationships between child and family characteristics and children’s school readiness outcomes. Because the sample was selected to be representative of all LAUP center-based programs, we can generalize the results to all LAUP center-based programs, classrooms, and children. We include a separate report on the PoP programs in Appendix E.

    After describing the characteristics of the representative sample of children and families, we report our findings related to the three broad questions this study addresses, which are described in more detail in Chapter II:

    1. What is the overall level and range of quality in the implementation of LAUP/PoP center-based programs?

    2. How do children enrolled in LAUP/PoP center-based programs develop from fall to spring?

    3. How are characteristics of children and families related to school readiness outcomes? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Doolittle, Fred; Lynn, Suzanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    Parents’ Fair Share (PFS) research on child support enforcement has several goals. First, it seeks to provide insights into the interaction between local child support enforcement systems and noncustodial parents whose children are on welfare. The approach taken in this report is to analyze what happened when the seven sites in the PFS Demonstration sought to identify low-income, unemployed noncustodial parents appropriate for PFS and refer them to the program. The report carries this story up to the point of referral of appropriate noncustodial parents to the program. Later reports in the project will continue the story, examining the implementation of PFS’s enhanced child support enforcement for noncustodial parents referred to the program and estimating program impacts on payment of child support and other key outcomes. (author abstract)

    Parents’ Fair Share (PFS) research on child support enforcement has several goals. First, it seeks to provide insights into the interaction between local child support enforcement systems and noncustodial parents whose children are on welfare. The approach taken in this report is to analyze what happened when the seven sites in the PFS Demonstration sought to identify low-income, unemployed noncustodial parents appropriate for PFS and refer them to the program. The report carries this story up to the point of referral of appropriate noncustodial parents to the program. Later reports in the project will continue the story, examining the implementation of PFS’s enhanced child support enforcement for noncustodial parents referred to the program and estimating program impacts on payment of child support and other key outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Polit, Denise F.; Nelson, Laura; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Seith, David; Rich, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    The 1996 national welfare reform law imposed a five-year time limit on federally funded cash assistance, established stricter work requirements, and provided greater flexibility for states in designing and managing programs. This report — the last in a series from MDRC’s Project on Devolution and Urban Change — describes how welfare reform unfolded in Los Angeles County (particularly between 1998 and 2001) and compares welfare reform experiences and outcomes there with those in the other three Urban Change sites: Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Miami- Dade County, and Philadelphia.

    After presenting a digest of the study’s findings, this summary report offers background on the Urban Change study in Los Angeles, depicts the county’s demographic and economic environment, describes the implementation of welfare reform, explains the effects of reform on welfare receipt and employment and on the lives of welfare recipients, describes what happened in Los Angeles neighborhoods during welfare reform, and concludes with policy implications drawn from conclusions from all four Urban...

    The 1996 national welfare reform law imposed a five-year time limit on federally funded cash assistance, established stricter work requirements, and provided greater flexibility for states in designing and managing programs. This report — the last in a series from MDRC’s Project on Devolution and Urban Change — describes how welfare reform unfolded in Los Angeles County (particularly between 1998 and 2001) and compares welfare reform experiences and outcomes there with those in the other three Urban Change sites: Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Miami- Dade County, and Philadelphia.

    After presenting a digest of the study’s findings, this summary report offers background on the Urban Change study in Los Angeles, depicts the county’s demographic and economic environment, describes the implementation of welfare reform, explains the effects of reform on welfare receipt and employment and on the lives of welfare recipients, describes what happened in Los Angeles neighborhoods during welfare reform, and concludes with policy implications drawn from conclusions from all four Urban Change sites. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Moreno, Manuel H.; Lichter, Michael; Burr, Beverly; Eisenberg, Nicole; González, Elizabeth; Horton, John; Joshi, Vandana; Shaw, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This report is part of a multi-year evaluation effort initiated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services (DPSS). The aim of the evaluation project, which is entitled, Evaluating CalWORKs in Los Angeles County, is to analyze the impact of welfare reform in Los Angeles County. The Project follows guidelines established in the CalWORKs Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Plan approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors in 1998. The Plan’s three major objectives are 1) measuring the success of welfare-to-work; 2) monitoring the effectiveness with which welfare reform has been implemented and administered; and 3) evaluating the impact of CalWORKs on families, children and communities in Los Angeles County. This report focuses on the third objective of the plan, evaluating the impact of CalWORKs on communities and families in Los Angeles County. 

    This report focuses on the impacts of welfare reform on families and communities during the first 21 months of its implementation in Los Angeles County. Because the implementation of welfare reform in...

    This report is part of a multi-year evaluation effort initiated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services (DPSS). The aim of the evaluation project, which is entitled, Evaluating CalWORKs in Los Angeles County, is to analyze the impact of welfare reform in Los Angeles County. The Project follows guidelines established in the CalWORKs Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Plan approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors in 1998. The Plan’s three major objectives are 1) measuring the success of welfare-to-work; 2) monitoring the effectiveness with which welfare reform has been implemented and administered; and 3) evaluating the impact of CalWORKs on families, children and communities in Los Angeles County. This report focuses on the third objective of the plan, evaluating the impact of CalWORKs on communities and families in Los Angeles County. 

    This report focuses on the impacts of welfare reform on families and communities during the first 21 months of its implementation in Los Angeles County. Because the implementation of welfare reform in Los Angeles County coincided with a period of sustained economic growth, it was difficult to analytically separate the effects of the reform program itself from the more general economic expansion. Whatever the underlying causes may be, however, welfare reform at least partially correlated with some positive outcomes for families and communities in Los Angeles County. (author abstract)

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