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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Love, John M.; Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Vogel, Cheri; Aikens, Nikki; Xue, Yange; Mabutas, Maricar; Carlson, Barbara Lepidus; Martin, Emily Sama; Paxton, Nora; Caspe, Margaret; Sprachman, Susan; Sonnenfeld, Kathy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    The focus of this report is the study’s second phase (fall 2007 and spring 2008). Phase 2 examined the quality, intensity, and overall implementation of LAUP programs (including classroom quality and teaching activities); documented the characteristics of the representative sample of teachers and the children and families enrolled in the programs; and measured children’s behavior and development across the full range of domains related to school readiness. We analyzed children’s fall-spring changes and examined the relationships between child and family characteristics and children’s school readiness outcomes. Because the sample was selected to be representative of all LAUP center-based programs, we can generalize the results to all LAUP center-based programs, classrooms, and children. We include a separate report on the PoP programs in Appendix E.

    After describing the characteristics of the representative sample of children and families, we report our findings related to the three broad questions this study addresses, which are described in more detail in Chapter II:...

    The focus of this report is the study’s second phase (fall 2007 and spring 2008). Phase 2 examined the quality, intensity, and overall implementation of LAUP programs (including classroom quality and teaching activities); documented the characteristics of the representative sample of teachers and the children and families enrolled in the programs; and measured children’s behavior and development across the full range of domains related to school readiness. We analyzed children’s fall-spring changes and examined the relationships between child and family characteristics and children’s school readiness outcomes. Because the sample was selected to be representative of all LAUP center-based programs, we can generalize the results to all LAUP center-based programs, classrooms, and children. We include a separate report on the PoP programs in Appendix E.

    After describing the characteristics of the representative sample of children and families, we report our findings related to the three broad questions this study addresses, which are described in more detail in Chapter II:

    1. What is the overall level and range of quality in the implementation of LAUP/PoP center-based programs?

    2. How do children enrolled in LAUP/PoP center-based programs develop from fall to spring?

    3. How are characteristics of children and families related to school readiness outcomes? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Moreno, Manuel H.; Lichter, Michael; Burr, Beverly; Eisenberg, Nicole; González, Elizabeth; Horton, John; Joshi, Vandana; Shaw, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This report is part of a multi-year evaluation effort initiated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services (DPSS). The aim of the evaluation project, which is entitled, Evaluating CalWORKs in Los Angeles County, is to analyze the impact of welfare reform in Los Angeles County. The Project follows guidelines established in the CalWORKs Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Plan approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors in 1998. The Plan’s three major objectives are 1) measuring the success of welfare-to-work; 2) monitoring the effectiveness with which welfare reform has been implemented and administered; and 3) evaluating the impact of CalWORKs on families, children and communities in Los Angeles County. This report focuses on the third objective of the plan, evaluating the impact of CalWORKs on communities and families in Los Angeles County. 

    This report focuses on the impacts of welfare reform on families and communities during the first 21 months of its implementation in Los Angeles County. Because the implementation of welfare reform in...

    This report is part of a multi-year evaluation effort initiated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Social Services (DPSS). The aim of the evaluation project, which is entitled, Evaluating CalWORKs in Los Angeles County, is to analyze the impact of welfare reform in Los Angeles County. The Project follows guidelines established in the CalWORKs Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Plan approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors in 1998. The Plan’s three major objectives are 1) measuring the success of welfare-to-work; 2) monitoring the effectiveness with which welfare reform has been implemented and administered; and 3) evaluating the impact of CalWORKs on families, children and communities in Los Angeles County. This report focuses on the third objective of the plan, evaluating the impact of CalWORKs on communities and families in Los Angeles County. 

    This report focuses on the impacts of welfare reform on families and communities during the first 21 months of its implementation in Los Angeles County. Because the implementation of welfare reform in Los Angeles County coincided with a period of sustained economic growth, it was difficult to analytically separate the effects of the reform program itself from the more general economic expansion. Whatever the underlying causes may be, however, welfare reform at least partially correlated with some positive outcomes for families and communities in Los Angeles County. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Felder, Henry E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    The January 1998 start of the California Work Opportunities and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program introduced welfare reform to Los Angeles County and changed the focus of the Department of Public Social Services (DPSS) from income maintenance to non-cash assistance, services and employment support.

    In January 1998, there were 738,794 persons aided on CalWORKs and 80,335 persons aided on General Relief – the primary cash assistance programs for DPSS. Of the 1.55 million persons aided, 53% received cash. By January 2006, only 20.8% of the 2.16 million persons aided by DPSS received cash, while the vast majority now received non-cash assistance, such as Medi-Cal Only, Food Stamps and In-Home Supportive Services. (author abstract)

    The January 1998 start of the California Work Opportunities and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program introduced welfare reform to Los Angeles County and changed the focus of the Department of Public Social Services (DPSS) from income maintenance to non-cash assistance, services and employment support.

    In January 1998, there were 738,794 persons aided on CalWORKs and 80,335 persons aided on General Relief – the primary cash assistance programs for DPSS. Of the 1.55 million persons aided, 53% received cash. By January 2006, only 20.8% of the 2.16 million persons aided by DPSS received cash, while the vast majority now received non-cash assistance, such as Medi-Cal Only, Food Stamps and In-Home Supportive Services. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chandler, Daniel; Meisel, Joan; Jordan, Pat
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has established an interagency Homeless Families Pilot Project in order to respond to the needs of CalWORKs-eligible homeless families in which a parent has mental health problems. The Board has funded the project in three phases.

    Phase One (initial pilot): In 2002 the board established an initial pilot project located in the “skid row” area to serve 26 homeless families that included a parent who had mental health problems. Interagency partners included the Department of Public Social Services (DPSS), the lead agency, the Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA).

    Phase Two (two sites): In September 2003, the board approved a resolution calling for two pilot projects—a continuation of the one in skid row and one in the San Gabriel Valley—to serve 20 clients each. The skid row project operates out of the Downtown Mental Health Clinic, and the San Gabriel Valley project is located at the PROTOTYPES clinic.

    Phase Three (expansion): The two existing sites were expanded...

    The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has established an interagency Homeless Families Pilot Project in order to respond to the needs of CalWORKs-eligible homeless families in which a parent has mental health problems. The Board has funded the project in three phases.

    Phase One (initial pilot): In 2002 the board established an initial pilot project located in the “skid row” area to serve 26 homeless families that included a parent who had mental health problems. Interagency partners included the Department of Public Social Services (DPSS), the lead agency, the Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA).

    Phase Two (two sites): In September 2003, the board approved a resolution calling for two pilot projects—a continuation of the one in skid row and one in the San Gabriel Valley—to serve 20 clients each. The skid row project operates out of the Downtown Mental Health Clinic, and the San Gabriel Valley project is located at the PROTOTYPES clinic.

    Phase Three (expansion): The two existing sites were expanded and an additional four sites were added in the spring of 2005. The skid row site has 100 participants and each other site has 50 participants for a total of 350 families. Each supervisorial district contains one site.

    At the request of the Board of Supervisors, the Department of Mental Health contracted with the California Institute for Mental Health (CIMH) to conduct an evaluation of the outcomes of the 40 participants served in 2003-2004. The contract has since been modified so that CIMH is also evaluating the expanded 350 participants program.

    This report presents service outcomes from Phase Two (two sites) and describes the service model as it has evolved in all three phases, through April 2005. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Moreno, Manuel H.; Toros, Halil; Joshi, Vandana; Stevens, Max; Beardsley, Julie; Ranney, Robert; Salem, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    This report is part of a multi-year evaluation effort initiated by the Los Angeles County Department of Social Services (DPSS). The aim of the evaluation project, which is entitled, Evaluating CalWORKS in Los Angeles County, is to analyze the impact of welfare reform in Los Angeles County. The Project follows guidelines established in the CalWORKs Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Plan approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors in 1998.

    This report evaluates employment and earnings outcomes for participants in three cohorts who entered DPSS’ Greater Avenues for Independence (GAIN) program during the second quarters of 1998, 1999, and 2000. The employment and earnings outcomes of these cohorts were followed through March 2001. The report provides policy recommendations based on the research findings. (author abstract)

    This report is part of a multi-year evaluation effort initiated by the Los Angeles County Department of Social Services (DPSS). The aim of the evaluation project, which is entitled, Evaluating CalWORKS in Los Angeles County, is to analyze the impact of welfare reform in Los Angeles County. The Project follows guidelines established in the CalWORKs Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Plan approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors in 1998.

    This report evaluates employment and earnings outcomes for participants in three cohorts who entered DPSS’ Greater Avenues for Independence (GAIN) program during the second quarters of 1998, 1999, and 2000. The employment and earnings outcomes of these cohorts were followed through March 2001. The report provides policy recommendations based on the research findings. (author abstract)

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