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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Barnow, Burt S.; Buck, Amy; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter; Ellis, Mei Ling; Steiner, Eric
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Outcomes for youth from foster care have been found to be poor. The education and employment outcomes of youth and alumni of foster care served by transition programmes located in five major US cities were examined. Data were collected by case managers and reported to evaluators quarterly on 1058 youth from foster care for over 2 years. Job preparation, transportation, child care, education support services and life skills were the most common services provided to youth. During the 2-year study period, 35% of participants obtained employment, 23% obtained a General Education Development or diploma, and 17% enrolled in post-secondary education. It was found that the longer the youth were enrolled, the more education and employment outcomes they achieved. Further, job preparation and income support services were associated significantly with achieving any positive education or employment outcome. Results indicated that certain services provided over an extended period of time can improve outcomes for youth placed in foster care. For youth to achieve positive outcomes as they...

    Outcomes for youth from foster care have been found to be poor. The education and employment outcomes of youth and alumni of foster care served by transition programmes located in five major US cities were examined. Data were collected by case managers and reported to evaluators quarterly on 1058 youth from foster care for over 2 years. Job preparation, transportation, child care, education support services and life skills were the most common services provided to youth. During the 2-year study period, 35% of participants obtained employment, 23% obtained a General Education Development or diploma, and 17% enrolled in post-secondary education. It was found that the longer the youth were enrolled, the more education and employment outcomes they achieved. Further, job preparation and income support services were associated significantly with achieving any positive education or employment outcome. Results indicated that certain services provided over an extended period of time can improve outcomes for youth placed in foster care. For youth to achieve positive outcomes as they transition to adulthood, additional services are necessary. Other implications are discussed. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Speiglman, Richard; Brown, Hana; Bos, Johannes M.; Li, Yongmei; Ortiz, Lorena
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    Since the United States implemented Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), or ‘welfare reform,’ the number of assistance cases without an adult receiving aid has risen dramatically. In states like California, these child-only cases now constitute the majority of all TANF cases. Despite this increase, existing research sheds little light on the composition of child-only caseloads and the status of the adults and children in such cases. Drawing on county administrative data and interviews with 143 parents associated with child-only cases in five California counties, this paper identifies both the demographics of the child-only caseload in these sites and the major barriers to employment that parents in sanctioned and timed-out child-only cases face. These include human capital, health, and family issues, in addition to other obstacles. The data suggest that, despite functioning as one administrative entity, CalWORKs, California's TANF program, has transformed into two separate programs: a welfare-to-work program and a subsistence-level cash assistance program for some...

    Since the United States implemented Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), or ‘welfare reform,’ the number of assistance cases without an adult receiving aid has risen dramatically. In states like California, these child-only cases now constitute the majority of all TANF cases. Despite this increase, existing research sheds little light on the composition of child-only caseloads and the status of the adults and children in such cases. Drawing on county administrative data and interviews with 143 parents associated with child-only cases in five California counties, this paper identifies both the demographics of the child-only caseload in these sites and the major barriers to employment that parents in sanctioned and timed-out child-only cases face. These include human capital, health, and family issues, in addition to other obstacles. The data suggest that, despite functioning as one administrative entity, CalWORKs, California's TANF program, has transformed into two separate programs: a welfare-to-work program and a subsistence-level cash assistance program for some members of child-only families. Given this transformation, the paper closes by suggesting a research agenda for future child-only scholarship and argues for policy innovations to meet the needs of the expanding child-only caseload. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Love, John M.; Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Vogel, Cheri; Aikens, Nikki; Xue, Yange; Mabutas, Maricar; Carlson, Barbara Lepidus; Martin, Emily Sama; Paxton, Nora; Caspe, Margaret; Sprachman, Susan; Sonnenfeld, Kathy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    The focus of this report is the study’s second phase (fall 2007 and spring 2008). Phase 2 examined the quality, intensity, and overall implementation of LAUP programs (including classroom quality and teaching activities); documented the characteristics of the representative sample of teachers and the children and families enrolled in the programs; and measured children’s behavior and development across the full range of domains related to school readiness. We analyzed children’s fall-spring changes and examined the relationships between child and family characteristics and children’s school readiness outcomes. Because the sample was selected to be representative of all LAUP center-based programs, we can generalize the results to all LAUP center-based programs, classrooms, and children. We include a separate report on the PoP programs in Appendix E.

    After describing the characteristics of the representative sample of children and families, we report our findings related to the three broad questions this study addresses, which are described in more detail in Chapter II:...

    The focus of this report is the study’s second phase (fall 2007 and spring 2008). Phase 2 examined the quality, intensity, and overall implementation of LAUP programs (including classroom quality and teaching activities); documented the characteristics of the representative sample of teachers and the children and families enrolled in the programs; and measured children’s behavior and development across the full range of domains related to school readiness. We analyzed children’s fall-spring changes and examined the relationships between child and family characteristics and children’s school readiness outcomes. Because the sample was selected to be representative of all LAUP center-based programs, we can generalize the results to all LAUP center-based programs, classrooms, and children. We include a separate report on the PoP programs in Appendix E.

    After describing the characteristics of the representative sample of children and families, we report our findings related to the three broad questions this study addresses, which are described in more detail in Chapter II:

    1. What is the overall level and range of quality in the implementation of LAUP/PoP center-based programs?

    2. How do children enrolled in LAUP/PoP center-based programs develop from fall to spring?

    3. How are characteristics of children and families related to school readiness outcomes? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Greenberg, Brian; Korb, Sophia; Cronon, Kristen; Anderson, Robert
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Purpose – Housing First has been upheld as an evidence-based best practice for transitioning homeless individuals into permanent housing in a maximally cost-effective and humane manner. However, there is much variance in the implementation and structure of Housing First programming in the USA. This paper aims to focus on a collaborative, interdisciplinary Housing First effort to house and provide case management and ancillary services to chronically homeless individuals in The City of San Mateo, California.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is a case study in which the philosophy, structure, and impact of San Mateo's outreach and housing team are discussed. To explore the project's impact, data concerning arrests and other criminal justice contacts, as well as health costs associated with these clients, both prior to and post housing and services, were collected and analyzed. These are corroborated with qualitative data on client outcomes.

    Findings – After participants received housing and wrap-around supportive services provided...

    Purpose – Housing First has been upheld as an evidence-based best practice for transitioning homeless individuals into permanent housing in a maximally cost-effective and humane manner. However, there is much variance in the implementation and structure of Housing First programming in the USA. This paper aims to focus on a collaborative, interdisciplinary Housing First effort to house and provide case management and ancillary services to chronically homeless individuals in The City of San Mateo, California.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is a case study in which the philosophy, structure, and impact of San Mateo's outreach and housing team are discussed. To explore the project's impact, data concerning arrests and other criminal justice contacts, as well as health costs associated with these clients, both prior to and post housing and services, were collected and analyzed. These are corroborated with qualitative data on client outcomes.

    Findings – After participants received housing and wrap-around supportive services provided through the collaboration of police, local stakeholders, and non-profits, the cost of medical care and criminal justice interventions were dramatically reduced. While challenges such as the availability of housing units remain, the findings of this study strongly support the interdisciplinary outreach team as a model for Housing First programming.

    Research limitations/implications – This is an in-depth study, derived from a particularly innovative project; and therefore the sample size is limited by the size of the project.

    Originality/value – The originality of this study lies in its analysis of a Housing First model which incorporates an interdisciplinary outreach team designed to provide highly individualized care for clients. The San Mateo permanent supportive housing pilot project is itself unique in that it incorporates a Homeless Outreach Team (HOT) comprised of the police, other government entities, local stakeholders, and other non-profits engaged with homelessness. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Grusky, David B.; Wimer, Christopher; Wright, Rachel; Fong, Kelley
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This qualitative study examines low-income San Franciscans’ decision-making around using or not using food from food banks and government food assistance programs. This project will help understand the in-depth processes that underlie low-income people’s decisions around food assistance, and therefore help public and private stakeholders improve systems of food assistance delivery, particularly around increasing take-up of healthy foods like fresh produce. Using approximately 60 in-depth interviews with low-income San Franciscans, this study will address the following questions: (1) What are the most prevalent reasons for non-use among low-income individuals who do not access food bank services? (2) How do the prevalence of these reasons differ by groups of individuals (parents of schoolchildren, residents of low-income housing projects, and unemployed individuals)? (3) How and why do non-users interface with other government food assistance programs like food stamps, school meals, etc.? And (4) How and why do nonusers utilize cheap, unhealthy food like fast food and “junk” food...

    This qualitative study examines low-income San Franciscans’ decision-making around using or not using food from food banks and government food assistance programs. This project will help understand the in-depth processes that underlie low-income people’s decisions around food assistance, and therefore help public and private stakeholders improve systems of food assistance delivery, particularly around increasing take-up of healthy foods like fresh produce. Using approximately 60 in-depth interviews with low-income San Franciscans, this study will address the following questions: (1) What are the most prevalent reasons for non-use among low-income individuals who do not access food bank services? (2) How do the prevalence of these reasons differ by groups of individuals (parents of schoolchildren, residents of low-income housing projects, and unemployed individuals)? (3) How and why do non-users interface with other government food assistance programs like food stamps, school meals, etc.? And (4) How and why do nonusers utilize cheap, unhealthy food like fast food and “junk” food vs. the healthier food, including fresh produce, that they might get from food bank sites? (author abstract)

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