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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2013

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg.  During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging...

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg.  During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging Scholar, and was featured April through June, 2013. Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg is a Senior Researcher at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago.

    An interactive question and answer session followed the formal presentation and this document provides a record of that dialogue. The recording from the Webinar as well as more information on Dr. Weigensberg and her work can be found here. The transcript Dr. Weigensberg’s Webinar can be found here. Dr. Weigensberg's PowerPoint from the Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2013

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg. During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging...

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg. During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging Scholar, and was featured April through June, 2013. Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg is a Senior Researcher at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago.

    More information on Dr. Weigensberg and her work can be found here. Dr. Weigensberg’s PowerPoint from the Webinar can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from Dr. Weigensberg’s Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: DeLuca, Stefanie; Duncan, Greg J.; Keels, Micere; Mendenhall, Ruby
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    The Gautreaux program was one of the first major residential mobility programs in the United States, providing low-income black families from public housing with opportunities to relocate to more affluent white neighborhoods in the Chicago suburbs and in other city neighborhoods. This paper reviews the most recent research on the Gautreaux families, which uses long-term administrative data to examine the effects of placement neighborhoods on the economic and social outcomes of mothers and children. We find that both Gautreaux mothers and their now-grown children were remarkably successful at maintaining the affluence and safety of their placement neighborhoods. As to the long-run economic independence of the mothers themselves, however, the new research fails to confirm the suburban advantages found in past Gautreaux research, although it does show that these outcomes were worst in the most racially segregated placement neighborhoods. With regard to the criminal records of Gautreaux children, it is found that suburban placement helped boys but not girls. Based on these results,...

    The Gautreaux program was one of the first major residential mobility programs in the United States, providing low-income black families from public housing with opportunities to relocate to more affluent white neighborhoods in the Chicago suburbs and in other city neighborhoods. This paper reviews the most recent research on the Gautreaux families, which uses long-term administrative data to examine the effects of placement neighborhoods on the economic and social outcomes of mothers and children. We find that both Gautreaux mothers and their now-grown children were remarkably successful at maintaining the affluence and safety of their placement neighborhoods. As to the long-run economic independence of the mothers themselves, however, the new research fails to confirm the suburban advantages found in past Gautreaux research, although it does show that these outcomes were worst in the most racially segregated placement neighborhoods. With regard to the criminal records of Gautreaux children, it is found that suburban placement helped boys but not girls. Based on these results, we review possible new directions for successful mobility programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2013

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg. During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging...

    On June 5, 2013, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Using Administrative Data: Quantitative and Qualitative Insights for Workforce Development Programs Webinar featuring Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg. During the Webinar Dr. Weigensberg discussed how the recent challenges with the economic environment have led to an increased need for employment and training assistance. Policymakers, practitioners, and consumers have demonstrated a growing demand for data to assist with decision-making to assess the performance of workforce development programs and obtain a better understanding of how these programs promote employment. This Webinar described recent research efforts in Chicago, highlighting how cross-system, longitudinal, and matched administrative data provided key information to support data-informed decision-making among local stakeholders. Strengths and limitations of administrative data were also discussed, including valuable qualitative insights into the "black box" of what makes workforce programs successful.

    Dr. Weigensberg was third Emerging Scholar, and was featured April through June, 2013. Dr. Elizabeth Weigensberg is a Senior Researcher at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. This document is the PowerPoint for the Webinar.

    The Webinar recording as well as more information on Dr. Weigensberg and her work can be found here. The transcript from Dr. Weigensberg’s Webinar can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from Dr. Weigensberg’s Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Bond, David
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    Employer engagement in Adult Career Pathways (ACP) programs can strengthen the efforts of adult educators to help learners attain secondary credentials, transition to  postsecondary programs, achieve industry credentials, and secure family-sustaining employment. Whether employer contributions result in the development of workplace  relevant curriculum, career awareness activities, work-based  learning opportunities, or in-kind support for equipment and other resources, employer engagement is essential for ACP programs. Employers can help ensure programs are responsive to the needs of local industry, while providing adult learners the relevant workplace context and foundational skills they must master to succeed along a career pathway.  Interfacing with adult learners in the classroom on a daily basis, teachers are well positioned to work with employers toward the goal of translating workplace skills into learning  objectives that can be taught within a career pathways context. This brief offers practical strategies on engaging  employers and building business-education...

    Employer engagement in Adult Career Pathways (ACP) programs can strengthen the efforts of adult educators to help learners attain secondary credentials, transition to  postsecondary programs, achieve industry credentials, and secure family-sustaining employment. Whether employer contributions result in the development of workplace  relevant curriculum, career awareness activities, work-based  learning opportunities, or in-kind support for equipment and other resources, employer engagement is essential for ACP programs. Employers can help ensure programs are responsive to the needs of local industry, while providing adult learners the relevant workplace context and foundational skills they must master to succeed along a career pathway.  Interfacing with adult learners in the classroom on a daily basis, teachers are well positioned to work with employers toward the goal of translating workplace skills into learning  objectives that can be taught within a career pathways context. This brief offers practical strategies on engaging  employers and building business-education partnerships to support ACP programs, and highlights promising examples from adult education providers in three states. (author abstract)

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