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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Golden, Olivia; Loprest, Pamela J. ; Adams, Gina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dean, Stacy; Rosenbaum, Dottie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This paper lays out the particulars. In the areas of policy, procedure, and data utilization, it shows why coordination among programs is critical and how to overcome its inherent challenges. Moving from theory to practice, it provides a catalogue of specific options states can pursue and reviews some best practices. While the paper focuses primarily on how states can better coordinate Medicaid and SNAP, it also offers examples of how to include TANF, child care, and other programs in the effort. With this information as a guide, state agencies providing key critical work supports to families in need can substantially streamline and improve the way they conduct their business. (author introduction)

    This paper lays out the particulars. In the areas of policy, procedure, and data utilization, it shows why coordination among programs is critical and how to overcome its inherent challenges. Moving from theory to practice, it provides a catalogue of specific options states can pursue and reviews some best practices. While the paper focuses primarily on how states can better coordinate Medicaid and SNAP, it also offers examples of how to include TANF, child care, and other programs in the effort. With this information as a guide, state agencies providing key critical work supports to families in need can substantially streamline and improve the way they conduct their business. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Levin, Madeleine; Neuberger, Zoe
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    “Community eligibility” is a powerful new tool to ensure that low-income children in high-poverty neighborhoods have access to healthy meals at school.  Established in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the option allows schools in high-poverty areas to offer nutritious meals through the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to all students at no charge.  More than 2,200 high-poverty schools serving nearly 1 million children in seven states — one in ten children across these states — operated under community eligibility during the 2012-2013 school year. Community eligibility is making a profound difference for students and schools. Findings from Illinois, Kentucky, and Michigan, where school districts first implemented the option in the 2011-2012 school year, show ongoing growth in the number of schools choosing community eligibility and a striking increase in the number of students eating school breakfast and lunch. This report analyzes the scope and impact of community eligibility in the seven states that implemented it in the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013...

    “Community eligibility” is a powerful new tool to ensure that low-income children in high-poverty neighborhoods have access to healthy meals at school.  Established in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the option allows schools in high-poverty areas to offer nutritious meals through the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to all students at no charge.  More than 2,200 high-poverty schools serving nearly 1 million children in seven states — one in ten children across these states — operated under community eligibility during the 2012-2013 school year. Community eligibility is making a profound difference for students and schools. Findings from Illinois, Kentucky, and Michigan, where school districts first implemented the option in the 2011-2012 school year, show ongoing growth in the number of schools choosing community eligibility and a striking increase in the number of students eating school breakfast and lunch. This report analyzes the scope and impact of community eligibility in the seven states that implemented it in the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 school years. (Four more states are starting in the 2013-2014 school year.) It is meant to serve as a guide for states and school districts as the nationwide rollout of community eligibility approaches. It explains and provides resources related to how community eligibility works, how it helps participating schools and families, how to operate without school meal applications, and how stakeholders can prepare to implement the option when it becomes available in all states for the 2014-2015 school year. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kaz, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report provides an extensive overview of Washington’s Basic Food Employment & Training (BFET) program and, more broadly, of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T).

    BFET is viewed as a national model for expanding SNAP E&T programs by building on the existing service delivery capacity of community colleges and community-based workforce training providers. This paper covers the history and development of the BFET program; the nuts and bolts of how the BFET program operates; how the BFET program is utilized by community colleges and community-based organizations; and a short overview of program outcomes. The paper summarizes the best practices that have emerged from BFET and offers recommendations to other states and localities in expanding SNAP E&T programs. (Author abstract)

    This report provides an extensive overview of Washington’s Basic Food Employment & Training (BFET) program and, more broadly, of federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T).

    BFET is viewed as a national model for expanding SNAP E&T programs by building on the existing service delivery capacity of community colleges and community-based workforce training providers. This paper covers the history and development of the BFET program; the nuts and bolts of how the BFET program operates; how the BFET program is utilized by community colleges and community-based organizations; and a short overview of program outcomes. The paper summarizes the best practices that have emerged from BFET and offers recommendations to other states and localities in expanding SNAP E&T programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Charette, Allison; Jakabovics, Andrew; Spotts, Michael A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The report highlights programs and best practices that address the nutritional needs of low-income communities. Readers will learn recommendations that demonstrate how affordable housing can be a platform and how housing providers can play a vital role in ensuring that low-income families have access to healthy foods. This paper aims to link the efforts of community developers, affordable housing providers and other stakeholders and to advance conversations between the housing and health fields. (Author abstract)

    The report highlights programs and best practices that address the nutritional needs of low-income communities. Readers will learn recommendations that demonstrate how affordable housing can be a platform and how housing providers can play a vital role in ensuring that low-income families have access to healthy foods. This paper aims to link the efforts of community developers, affordable housing providers and other stakeholders and to advance conversations between the housing and health fields. (Author abstract)

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