Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Winder, Katie; Moffitt, Robert
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2002

    For program analysts working with targeted social assistance programs, a good understanding of the extent of volatility in the caseload is important to budgetary decisions and proper evaluation of the effects of the program. The state and federal welfare reforms of the mid-1990s were associated with declines in participation that were precipitous in the case of cash welfare, but also significant for programs such as Medicaid and Food Stamps. Most research investigating the employment and income consequences of these reforms has focused on those who have left welfare. It is, however, equally important to understand the consequences for those who entered Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) after the reforms and for potentially eligible families who did not enter welfare. The research reported in this article explores postreform patterns of welfare program use, income, and employment among poor families, using data from the Three-City Study, a longitudinal survey of about 2,400 families with children living in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods in Boston, Chicago, and...

    For program analysts working with targeted social assistance programs, a good understanding of the extent of volatility in the caseload is important to budgetary decisions and proper evaluation of the effects of the program. The state and federal welfare reforms of the mid-1990s were associated with declines in participation that were precipitous in the case of cash welfare, but also significant for programs such as Medicaid and Food Stamps. Most research investigating the employment and income consequences of these reforms has focused on those who have left welfare. It is, however, equally important to understand the consequences for those who entered Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) after the reforms and for potentially eligible families who did not enter welfare. The research reported in this article explores postreform patterns of welfare program use, income, and employment among poor families, using data from the Three-City Study, a longitudinal survey of about 2,400 families with children living in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio. (author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Wiseman, Michael; Newell, Gabrielle; Frohlich, Lauren; Goerge, Robert; Hahn, Heather
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Moderated by Gabrielle Newell (Administration for Children and Families/Business Strategy Consultants), this session explored how states meet work participation rate targets and spend their TANF funds; trends in program entry and exit among TANF recipients; and how states and the federal government measure employment outcomes in TANF. Michael Wiseman (Administration for Children and Families/George Washington University) served as discussant for this multifaceted exploration of TANF through data. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    Moderated by Gabrielle Newell (Administration for Children and Families/Business Strategy Consultants), this session explored how states meet work participation rate targets and spend their TANF funds; trends in program entry and exit among TANF recipients; and how states and the federal government measure employment outcomes in TANF. Michael Wiseman (Administration for Children and Families/George Washington University) served as discussant for this multifaceted exploration of TANF through data. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Seymour, Anthea; Armstrong, Karen; Bos, Johannes; Cadena, Brian
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Drawing on research from California, Colorado, and Washington, D.C., this session explored many facets of TANF. Three researchers shared findings from recent evaluations of a significant policy change in California’s TANF agency; a subsidized employment program in Washington, D.C.; and a transitional jobs program in Colorado. This session was moderated by the director of Washington, D.C.’s TANF agency, Anthea Seymour (D.C. Department of Human Services). Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    Drawing on research from California, Colorado, and Washington, D.C., this session explored many facets of TANF. Three researchers shared findings from recent evaluations of a significant policy change in California’s TANF agency; a subsidized employment program in Washington, D.C.; and a transitional jobs program in Colorado. This session was moderated by the director of Washington, D.C.’s TANF agency, Anthea Seymour (D.C. Department of Human Services). Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)