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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Grosh, Margaret; del Ninno, Carlo; Tesliuc, Emil; Ouerghi, Azedine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    The role of safety nets in reducing poverty and vulnerability is increasingly recognized in social policy.  Well designed safety nets can play a productive role in promoting development, as well as redistributing wealth to the most vulnerable. 

    Drawing on research, policy, and operational documents from the World Bank’s work with over 100 countries, "For Protection & Promotion" provides comprehensive guidance on the design and implementation of cost-effective safety nets, including how to define eligibility and select beneficiaries, set and pay benefits, and monitor and evaluate programs and systems.

    Marking the first major Bank publication on the topic in over ten years, the book synthesizes the literature to date and enriches it with new examples on various program options - cash transfers (conditional and unconditional), in-kind transfers, price subsidies, fee waivers, and public works.

    Country experiences are provided throughout.  Guidance for the customization of safety nets is explored in six settings – low income, middle income, in or following an...

    The role of safety nets in reducing poverty and vulnerability is increasingly recognized in social policy.  Well designed safety nets can play a productive role in promoting development, as well as redistributing wealth to the most vulnerable. 

    Drawing on research, policy, and operational documents from the World Bank’s work with over 100 countries, "For Protection & Promotion" provides comprehensive guidance on the design and implementation of cost-effective safety nets, including how to define eligibility and select beneficiaries, set and pay benefits, and monitor and evaluate programs and systems.

    Marking the first major Bank publication on the topic in over ten years, the book synthesizes the literature to date and enriches it with new examples on various program options - cash transfers (conditional and unconditional), in-kind transfers, price subsidies, fee waivers, and public works.

    Country experiences are provided throughout.  Guidance for the customization of safety nets is explored in six settings – low income, middle income, in or following an economic crisis, following natural disasters and using safety nets to facility reform, and for rising food prices. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Riccio, James; Dechausay, Nadine; Miller, Cynthia; Nunez, Stephen; Verma, Nandita; Yang, Edith
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Opportunity NYC–Family Rewards, an experimental, privately funded, conditional cash transfer (CCT) program to help families break the cycle of poverty, was the first comprehensive CCT program in a developed country. Launched in 2007 by New York City’s Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO), Family Rewards offered cash assistance to low-income families to reduce immediate hardship, but conditioned that assistance on families’ efforts to build up their “human capital” to reduce the risk of longer-term and second-generation poverty. The program thus tied cash rewards to pre-specified activities and outcomes in children’s education, families’ preventive health care, and parents’ employment. It operated as a pilot program for three years, concluding, as planned, in August 2010.
    
    Six community-based organizations, in partnership with a lead nonprofit agency, ran Family Rewards in six of New York City’s highest-poverty communities. MDRC is evaluating the program through a randomized control trial involving approximately 4,800 families and 11,000 children,...

    Opportunity NYC–Family Rewards, an experimental, privately funded, conditional cash transfer (CCT) program to help families break the cycle of poverty, was the first comprehensive CCT program in a developed country. Launched in 2007 by New York City’s Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO), Family Rewards offered cash assistance to low-income families to reduce immediate hardship, but conditioned that assistance on families’ efforts to build up their “human capital” to reduce the risk of longer-term and second-generation poverty. The program thus tied cash rewards to pre-specified activities and outcomes in children’s education, families’ preventive health care, and parents’ employment. It operated as a pilot program for three years, concluding, as planned, in August 2010.
    
    Six community-based organizations, in partnership with a lead nonprofit agency, ran Family Rewards in six of New York City’s highest-poverty communities. MDRC is evaluating the program through a randomized control trial involving approximately 4,800 families and 11,000 children, half of whom could receive the cash rewards if they met the required conditions, and half who were assigned to a control group that could not receive the rewards. This report presents final results on the experience of operating the program and interim findings on its effects on a wide range of outcomes three to four years after participants entered the program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Milkman, Ruth
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2006

    Recent developments in southern California—often a harbinger of national trends—suggest that reports of organized labor’s demise may be exaggerated. In Los Angeles, where inequality by both class and nativity is so stark that the city is routinely compared to the Third World, the dynamics that generated the janitors’ 1990 victory sparked a decade-long resurgence of union organizing and community-based economic justice campaigns—highlighting the possibility that labor might become an agent of social transformation once again. Whether or not that possibility is realized will have major implications for the wider society. Today, at both the local and national levels, the labor movement is the one organized entity that regularly and systematically challenges the rapidly growing inequality between rich and poor, as well as that between native- and foreign-born workers. The ebb and flow of unionism over the past century has been a key determinant of the life chances of working people in the United States, for immigrants and natives alike. (author introduction)

    Recent developments in southern California—often a harbinger of national trends—suggest that reports of organized labor’s demise may be exaggerated. In Los Angeles, where inequality by both class and nativity is so stark that the city is routinely compared to the Third World, the dynamics that generated the janitors’ 1990 victory sparked a decade-long resurgence of union organizing and community-based economic justice campaigns—highlighting the possibility that labor might become an agent of social transformation once again. Whether or not that possibility is realized will have major implications for the wider society. Today, at both the local and national levels, the labor movement is the one organized entity that regularly and systematically challenges the rapidly growing inequality between rich and poor, as well as that between native- and foreign-born workers. The ebb and flow of unionism over the past century has been a key determinant of the life chances of working people in the United States, for immigrants and natives alike. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Zill, Nicholas; Resnick, Gary; Kim, Kwang; O'Donnell, Kevin; Sorongon, Alberto; Ziv, Yair; Alva, Souma; McKey, Ruth Hubbell; Pai-Samant, Shefali; Clark, Cheryl; O'Brien, Robert; D'Elio, Mary Ann
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    In 1997, Head Start launched the Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), a study with a nationally representative sample of Head Start programs to describe the characteristics, experiences, and outcomes for children and families served by Head Start. It also explores the relationships among family and program characteristics and outcomes. In 1997, the FACES design included a nationally representative sample of 3,200 3- and 4-year old children and their families in 40 programs. The FACES 2000 sample includes 2,800 children and their families in 43 different Head Start programs across the nation.

    Each cohort of FACES employs a nationally stratified sample of Head Start programs, centers, classrooms, children, and parents. FACES 2000 features four phases of data collection and follows 3- and 4-year-old children from program entry, through one or two years of program experience, with followup in the Spring of kindergarten. The FACES 2000 battery has four main components: the direct child assessment, parent interview, teacher and staff interviews, and classroom...

    In 1997, Head Start launched the Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), a study with a nationally representative sample of Head Start programs to describe the characteristics, experiences, and outcomes for children and families served by Head Start. It also explores the relationships among family and program characteristics and outcomes. In 1997, the FACES design included a nationally representative sample of 3,200 3- and 4-year old children and their families in 40 programs. The FACES 2000 sample includes 2,800 children and their families in 43 different Head Start programs across the nation.

    Each cohort of FACES employs a nationally stratified sample of Head Start programs, centers, classrooms, children, and parents. FACES 2000 features four phases of data collection and follows 3- and 4-year-old children from program entry, through one or two years of program experience, with followup in the Spring of kindergarten. The FACES 2000 battery has four main components: the direct child assessment, parent interview, teacher and staff interviews, and classroom observations. Although there is no non-Head Start comparison group in FACES, the use of assessment measures with national norms permits comparisons between the skills of children in the sample and children of the same ages in the norming samples. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rowe, Gretchen; O'Brien, Carolyn T.; Hall, Sam; Pindus, Nancy M.; Eyster, Lauren; Koralek, Robin; Stanczyk, Alexandra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The Urban Institute conducted a comprehensive study of state efforts to modernize the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Although modernization may be defined in many ways, this study adopted a broad definition of modernization described within four categories—policy changes, organizational changes, technological innovations, and partnering arrangements. The study included three data collection activities: initial site visits to four states; a national survey of all states, including a sample of local offices and partner organizations; and intensive case studies in 14 states. The states selected to participate in the case studies included Colorado, D.C., Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Mississippi, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin. The main focus of this report is on findings from the intensive case studies conducted between February and June 2009. (author abstract)

    The Urban Institute conducted a comprehensive study of state efforts to modernize the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Although modernization may be defined in many ways, this study adopted a broad definition of modernization described within four categories—policy changes, organizational changes, technological innovations, and partnering arrangements. The study included three data collection activities: initial site visits to four states; a national survey of all states, including a sample of local offices and partner organizations; and intensive case studies in 14 states. The states selected to participate in the case studies included Colorado, D.C., Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Mississippi, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin. The main focus of this report is on findings from the intensive case studies conducted between February and June 2009. (author abstract)

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