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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Research Connections
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2006

    Research Connections conducted a comprehensive search of its collection for resources focused on the relationship between receipt of child care subsidies and employment outcomes of families receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) and other low income families.

    From the many results, Research Connections selected a limited number of resources of various types- including reports and papers, fact sheets and briefs, summaries, and reviews. Selection criteria included policy relevance and relatively recent publication. (Note: much of the literature on this topic focuses on families receiving welfare given that a key subsidy policy is to help families transition from welfare to work, however the resources below also include research on the subsidy receipt and employment outcomes of former welfare recipients and low-income families.)

    Resources are organized according to publisher type and publication date. Research Connection’s one-sentence description is included for each resource on the following list. For complete citations, which include abstracts and...

    Research Connections conducted a comprehensive search of its collection for resources focused on the relationship between receipt of child care subsidies and employment outcomes of families receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) and other low income families.

    From the many results, Research Connections selected a limited number of resources of various types- including reports and papers, fact sheets and briefs, summaries, and reviews. Selection criteria included policy relevance and relatively recent publication. (Note: much of the literature on this topic focuses on families receiving welfare given that a key subsidy policy is to help families transition from welfare to work, however the resources below also include research on the subsidy receipt and employment outcomes of former welfare recipients and low-income families.)

    Resources are organized according to publisher type and publication date. Research Connection’s one-sentence description is included for each resource on the following list. For complete citations, which include abstracts and full text for some resources, click on the titles. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gennetian, Lisa A.; Gassman-Pines, Anna; Huston, Aletha C.; Crosby, Danielle A.; Chang, Young Eun; Lowe, Edward D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Child care policies have been a relatively understudied element of experimental welfare and employment studies. Yet, the tests of child care policy within experimental welfare and employment studies provide a source of convincing evidence about whether or not and how child care assistance for paid or regulated care can affect patterns of child care use, including subsidy use and reported problems with child care. Of the 21 experimental programs reviewed, 7 offered expanded child care assistance to experimental group members that differed from what was offered to control group members. These treatment differences depict some aspects of current child care policies implemented in states and counties, particularly those policies that affect payment or information about child care services. The remaining 14 experimental programs offered the same child care assistance to experimental and control group members. The child care policy dimension(s) represents a unique policy component across the array of experimental programs, providing a foundation for understanding how treatment...

    Child care policies have been a relatively understudied element of experimental welfare and employment studies. Yet, the tests of child care policy within experimental welfare and employment studies provide a source of convincing evidence about whether or not and how child care assistance for paid or regulated care can affect patterns of child care use, including subsidy use and reported problems with child care. Of the 21 experimental programs reviewed, 7 offered expanded child care assistance to experimental group members that differed from what was offered to control group members. These treatment differences depict some aspects of current child care policies implemented in states and counties, particularly those policies that affect payment or information about child care services. The remaining 14 experimental programs offered the same child care assistance to experimental and control group members. The child care policy dimension(s) represents a unique policy component across the array of experimental programs, providing a foundation for understanding how treatment differences in child care policy may have led to program effects on economic, child care and other outcomes independent from the influence of other policy components such as mandates, earnings supplements and time limits. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rohacek, Monica
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) is a primary source of assistance helping low-income parents pay for child care. Among other goals, the Office of Child Care has specified that CCDF policies should be "fair to providers." This issue matters because CCDF policies can influence provider decisions about enrolling children with vouchers as well as provider decisions about quality. This brief summarizes research that can inform implementation of CCDF policies that are fair to providers with a focus on payment rates, payment policies, timeliness of payment, and administrative and other costs of participation in the CCDF voucher system. (author abstract)

    The federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) is a primary source of assistance helping low-income parents pay for child care. Among other goals, the Office of Child Care has specified that CCDF policies should be "fair to providers." This issue matters because CCDF policies can influence provider decisions about enrolling children with vouchers as well as provider decisions about quality. This brief summarizes research that can inform implementation of CCDF policies that are fair to providers with a focus on payment rates, payment policies, timeliness of payment, and administrative and other costs of participation in the CCDF voucher system. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Henry, Colleen; Werschkul, Misha; Rao, Manita C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    In the current debate over welfare reauthorization, the importance of child care assistance for low-income and working families cannot be overstated. This briefing paper explores the current status of government child care assistance, reviews research on the connections between child care assistance, mothers’ labor force participation, and children’s development, and offers policy recommendations for improving the quality and quantity of child care assistance. (author abstract)

    In the current debate over welfare reauthorization, the importance of child care assistance for low-income and working families cannot be overstated. This briefing paper explores the current status of government child care assistance, reviews research on the connections between child care assistance, mothers’ labor force participation, and children’s development, and offers policy recommendations for improving the quality and quantity of child care assistance. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lawrence, Sharmila; Kreader, J. Lee
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    A growing body of research is starting to shed light on the ways child care subsidies are achieving one of their central goals—supporting employment for low-income parents. Second in the series Reviews of Research on Child Care Subsidies, this research brief summarizes the Research Connections literature review of the same title, Parent Employment and the Use of Child Care Subsidies, which examines recent research addressing the basic question:

    • What parent employment outcomes are associated with the use of child care subsidies?

    That is, how do employment decisions and patterns for low-income parents with subsidies tend to differ from those of low-income parents without them? For which subgroups of these parents—such as, those with or without high school diplomas, with or without cash assistance histories—do child care subsidies appear to make more difference? What factors in addition to subsidies influence parents’ employment decisions? While these questions are posed broadly in terms of “parents,” the research to date focuses on “mothers.” (author...

    A growing body of research is starting to shed light on the ways child care subsidies are achieving one of their central goals—supporting employment for low-income parents. Second in the series Reviews of Research on Child Care Subsidies, this research brief summarizes the Research Connections literature review of the same title, Parent Employment and the Use of Child Care Subsidies, which examines recent research addressing the basic question:

    • What parent employment outcomes are associated with the use of child care subsidies?

    That is, how do employment decisions and patterns for low-income parents with subsidies tend to differ from those of low-income parents without them? For which subgroups of these parents—such as, those with or without high school diplomas, with or without cash assistance histories—do child care subsidies appear to make more difference? What factors in addition to subsidies influence parents’ employment decisions? While these questions are posed broadly in terms of “parents,” the research to date focuses on “mothers.” (author abstract)

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