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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: National Women's Law Center
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (Author abstract)

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Golden, Olivia; Loprest, Pamela J. ; Adams, Gina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin; Giannarelli, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This report is the first book of tables to be produced from the CCDF Policies Database. It presents key aspects of the differences in CCDF-funded programs across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories and outlying areas, as of October 1, 2009. The Book of Tables highlights policy variations across five general areas of policy: eligibility requirements for families and children; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; policies for providers, including maximum reimbursement rates; and overall administrative and quality information. (author abstract)

    This report is the first book of tables to be produced from the CCDF Policies Database. It presents key aspects of the differences in CCDF-funded programs across all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories and outlying areas, as of October 1, 2009. The Book of Tables highlights policy variations across five general areas of policy: eligibility requirements for families and children; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; policies for providers, including maximum reimbursement rates; and overall administrative and quality information. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin; Huber, Erika; Giannarelli, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The CCDF Policies Database Book of Tables provides tables containing key Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) policies for each state as of October 1, 2011. The tables are based on information in the CCDF Policies Database, a database tracking state child care subsidy policies over time and across the States, D.C., and the Territories. The Book summarizes a subset of the information available in the database, including information about eligibility requirements for families; application, redetermination, priority, and waiting list policies; family copayments; and provider policies and reimbursement rates. The 2011 Book also includes a complete set of 2010 tables. (author abstract)

    The CCDF Policies Database Book of Tables provides tables containing key Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) policies for each state as of October 1, 2011. The tables are based on information in the CCDF Policies Database, a database tracking state child care subsidy policies over time and across the States, D.C., and the Territories. The Book summarizes a subset of the information available in the database, including information about eligibility requirements for families; application, redetermination, priority, and waiting list policies; family copayments; and provider policies and reimbursement rates. The 2011 Book also includes a complete set of 2010 tables. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Guzman, Lina; Freed, Suzanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    The Child Care Bureau (CCB) of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is currently undertaking efforts to develop a performance measure of child care as a work support that would allow them to monitor the Child Care Development Fund’s (CCDF) goal of  helping low-income families become self-sufficient through access to affordable, quality child care that meets their needs.

    The objective of this paper is to provide roundtable participants with an overview of the current state of data on child care as a support to employment and economic self-sufficiency in order to facilitate discussion and identify potential next steps. This paper begins with a discussion of federal policies related to child care subsidies and government performance measures. This section is intended to outline the type of data and measures that are needed when developing performance measures, and, more generally, to provide the policy context for why such performance measures are needed. 

    Within this framework, we then outline key features that are needed in a performance measure of...

    The Child Care Bureau (CCB) of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is currently undertaking efforts to develop a performance measure of child care as a work support that would allow them to monitor the Child Care Development Fund’s (CCDF) goal of  helping low-income families become self-sufficient through access to affordable, quality child care that meets their needs.

    The objective of this paper is to provide roundtable participants with an overview of the current state of data on child care as a support to employment and economic self-sufficiency in order to facilitate discussion and identify potential next steps. This paper begins with a discussion of federal policies related to child care subsidies and government performance measures. This section is intended to outline the type of data and measures that are needed when developing performance measures, and, more generally, to provide the policy context for why such performance measures are needed. 

    Within this framework, we then outline key features that are needed in a performance measure of child care as a support to employment and economic self-sufficiency and possible approaches to its development. In the third section, the paper presents a brief summary of what research tells us about child care as a support to employment, and the relationship between child care subsidies and employment outcomes.  Next, the paper reviews the data available at the national, state, and local levels through surveys and administrative data systems.  This section then presents and reviews some issues to consider when evaluating the appropriateness of datasets to construct a performance measure of child care as a work support.  Key aspects of  available administrative and survey data are also reviewed.  Within this  context, the final section presents potential next steps and issues for roundtable participants to consider while formulating their recommendations.   

    The roundtable seeks to build upon and continue the work CCB has been involved in to develop performance measures to  monitor CCDF’s program goals by bringing together key stakeholders from varying perspectives.  Among the goals of the roundtable is to identify appropriate and clearly articulate indicator(s) to track the effectiveness and performance of CCDF.  And, more broadly, to identify indicators that can demonstrate the relationship between child care subsidies and low-income working families’ employment patterns.   

    It is also hoped that the roundtable will serve to evaluate the appropriateness of existing data sets to develop such measures. An additional and equally important goal of the roundtable is to bring light to alternative  data sets or measures, in particular those collected at the state or local level, which are already known or reported to CCB. For example, CCB is interested in learning about state required performance measures that may be appropriate for use at the national level. It is important to emphasize, at the start of this paper, that CCB is open to all possibilities including those not discussed in this paper. (author abstract).

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