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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Witte, Ann D.; Queralt, Magaly
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    We find that reforms in the Rhode Island subsidized child care program, including income and age eligibility expansions and increases in the reimbursement rates paid to formal providers, significantly increased the likelihood that current and former welfare families: a) would use child care subsidies and b) would work 20 or more hours per week. In addition, these policy changes significantly increased the probability that family heads of household would leave welfare for work. The most powerful impact of the Rhode Island changes in child care policies was on families that had left welfare (i.e., former cash recipients) and that worked at least 20 hours per week. These policy changes had less effect on families receiving cash assistance and enrolled in some approved activity (e.g., education or training) other than work. We were not able to assess the impact of the Rhode Island policy changes on families who were never on cash assistance. However, the large increase in the number of such families receiving child care subsidies after the reforms were instituted suggests that the...

    We find that reforms in the Rhode Island subsidized child care program, including income and age eligibility expansions and increases in the reimbursement rates paid to formal providers, significantly increased the likelihood that current and former welfare families: a) would use child care subsidies and b) would work 20 or more hours per week. In addition, these policy changes significantly increased the probability that family heads of household would leave welfare for work. The most powerful impact of the Rhode Island changes in child care policies was on families that had left welfare (i.e., former cash recipients) and that worked at least 20 hours per week. These policy changes had less effect on families receiving cash assistance and enrolled in some approved activity (e.g., education or training) other than work. We were not able to assess the impact of the Rhode Island policy changes on families who were never on cash assistance. However, the large increase in the number of such families receiving child care subsidies after the reforms were instituted suggests that the impact may have been substantial. We also estimate that Rhode Island's reform of its cash assistance program and of its child care subsidy program, in combination, almost tripled the probability that a typical head of household currently or formerly receiving welfare would work 20 or more hours per week (i.e., the probability increased from 7% in the second quarter of 1996 to 22% in the second quarter of 2000) and almost halved the probability that a single mother in the sample would be on cash assistance and neither working nor in some other approved activity (i.e., such probability decreased from 47% in the second quarter of 1996 to 25% in the second quarter of 2000).  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Goerge, Robert; Harris, Allison; Bilaver, Lucy M.; Franzetta, Kerry; Reidy, Mairead; Schexnayder, Deanna; Schroeder, Daniel G.; Staveley, Jane; Kreader, J.L.; Obenski, Sally; Prevost, Ronald C.; Berning, Michael E.; Resnick, Dean M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    This research study analyzes child care subsidy (CCS) participation and employment outcomes among low-income families in Illinois, Maryland, and Texas. The study seeks to learn who among low-income eligible families participates in the child care subsidy program, and the effect of subsidy participation on employment and eligibility status. This study was conducted by a unique collaboration of the U.S. Census Bureau and three University-based research centers using linked individual-level data from the American Community Survey/Supplemental Survey for 2001 (ACS/SS01) and state administrative data. Independent variable included characteristics of program participation, characteristics of the parents, characteristics of the family, and characteristics of the parent’s jobs. Results across all three states demonstrated that those who had received Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) within 3 months of the ACS survey participated in the CCS at higher rates than those who had not received TANF. Results also showed higher levels of participation among younger parents (24...

    This research study analyzes child care subsidy (CCS) participation and employment outcomes among low-income families in Illinois, Maryland, and Texas. The study seeks to learn who among low-income eligible families participates in the child care subsidy program, and the effect of subsidy participation on employment and eligibility status. This study was conducted by a unique collaboration of the U.S. Census Bureau and three University-based research centers using linked individual-level data from the American Community Survey/Supplemental Survey for 2001 (ACS/SS01) and state administrative data. Independent variable included characteristics of program participation, characteristics of the parents, characteristics of the family, and characteristics of the parent’s jobs. Results across all three states demonstrated that those who had received Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) within 3 months of the ACS survey participated in the CCS at higher rates than those who had not received TANF. Results also showed higher levels of participation among younger parents (24 years of age or younger) than older parents (25 years and older). CCS participation was higher among single parents with less than a high school education than among those with at least a high school diploma and among those families who reported having more than 3 children under age 13 in the home. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Adams, Gina; Rohacek, Monica; Snyder, Kathleen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Subsidies in the form of child care vouchers that help parents pay for child care in the setting of their choice are an important support for low-income families. Providers willing to accept children with vouchers, and to provide high quality services, are a linchpin of the child care voucher system. Yet we know relatively little about the experiences of child care providers with the voucher system, and the policies and practices that most affect them. This comprehensive report looks at the experiences of child care centers and licensed family child care homes with the voucher subsidy system in five counties around the country in 2003–04. Using a blend of quantitative data from a telephone survey of a representative sample of providers and qualitative data from site visits, this report examines the experiences of providers in serving children who receive vouchers and in working with voucher agencies; identifies the key features of the child care voucher program, policies, and implementation that most affect providers; and highlights specific policy strategies that can help the...

    Subsidies in the form of child care vouchers that help parents pay for child care in the setting of their choice are an important support for low-income families. Providers willing to accept children with vouchers, and to provide high quality services, are a linchpin of the child care voucher system. Yet we know relatively little about the experiences of child care providers with the voucher system, and the policies and practices that most affect them. This comprehensive report looks at the experiences of child care centers and licensed family child care homes with the voucher subsidy system in five counties around the country in 2003–04. Using a blend of quantitative data from a telephone survey of a representative sample of providers and qualitative data from site visits, this report examines the experiences of providers in serving children who receive vouchers and in working with voucher agencies; identifies the key features of the child care voucher program, policies, and implementation that most affect providers; and highlights specific policy strategies that can help the voucher system better meet the needs of providers. The paper is one of several being produced as part of the Urban Institute's Child Care Providers and the Child Care Voucher System project. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meloy, Mary E.; Phillips, Deborah A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Children who enter the child welfare system at a young age are at risk for a myriad of developmental, physical, and mental health problems. The risks faced by these vulnerable young children may be exacerbated by placement disruptions during foster care. This study utilizes administrative data from Illinois to explore the potential of child care assistance programs to reduce placement disruptions among foster children under the age of five. Survival analysis results suggest that receipt of child care assistance is associated with a reduced risk of placement disruption over time, especially for children who enter foster care as preschoolers. These findings are discussed in the context of the literature on the compensatory role that early care and education can play in short circuiting the detrimental impacts of toxic stress. With regard to public policy, they suggest an important, largely unexamined, role for child care support within the child welfare system. (author abstract)

    Children who enter the child welfare system at a young age are at risk for a myriad of developmental, physical, and mental health problems. The risks faced by these vulnerable young children may be exacerbated by placement disruptions during foster care. This study utilizes administrative data from Illinois to explore the potential of child care assistance programs to reduce placement disruptions among foster children under the age of five. Survival analysis results suggest that receipt of child care assistance is associated with a reduced risk of placement disruption over time, especially for children who enter foster care as preschoolers. These findings are discussed in the context of the literature on the compensatory role that early care and education can play in short circuiting the detrimental impacts of toxic stress. With regard to public policy, they suggest an important, largely unexamined, role for child care support within the child welfare system. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Henly, Julia R.; Gelatt, Julia; Sandstrom, Heather; Kim, JaeSeung; Claessens, Amy; Healy, Olivia; Pilarz, Alejandra Ros
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Despite a growing awareness of subsidy instability, knowledge remains limited regarding its determinants and how families and their child care providers respond to a break in program enrollment. In an effort to address this knowledge gap and to support policy efforts to improve the design and delivery of child care assistance to low-income families, researchers from the University of Chicago and the Urban Institute partnered with state child care administrators in Illinois and New York to conduct a study examining the factors that contribute to instability in families’ receipt of child care subsidies and how this instability may affect the continuity of their care arrangements. This mixed-methods multiyear (2010-14) study, the Illinois-New York Child Care Research Partnership Study: Phase 1, analyzed the experiences of a new cohort of child care subsidy clients residing in four sites in Illinois and New York. The study used longitudinal state administrative data from child care payment records in combination with newly collected telephone survey and qualitative interview...

    Despite a growing awareness of subsidy instability, knowledge remains limited regarding its determinants and how families and their child care providers respond to a break in program enrollment. In an effort to address this knowledge gap and to support policy efforts to improve the design and delivery of child care assistance to low-income families, researchers from the University of Chicago and the Urban Institute partnered with state child care administrators in Illinois and New York to conduct a study examining the factors that contribute to instability in families’ receipt of child care subsidies and how this instability may affect the continuity of their care arrangements. This mixed-methods multiyear (2010-14) study, the Illinois-New York Child Care Research Partnership Study: Phase 1, analyzed the experiences of a new cohort of child care subsidy clients residing in four sites in Illinois and New York. The study used longitudinal state administrative data from child care payment records in combination with newly collected telephone survey and qualitative interview data from subsidy clients to identify patterns of program use and to examine factors that predict exits from the subsidy program and from subsidized providers. This research report discusses findings from the administrative data analysis and telephone survey. (Author abstract)

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