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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Schulman, Karen; Blank, Helen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    A study by the National Women’s Law Center of child care policies in 50 states and the District of Columbia reveals that between February of 2008 and February of 2009 more states made cuts than made improvements in desperately needed child care assistance, worsening an already bleak landscape for parents trying to afford reliable child care. (author abstract)

    A study by the National Women’s Law Center of child care policies in 50 states and the District of Columbia reveals that between February of 2008 and February of 2009 more states made cuts than made improvements in desperately needed child care assistance, worsening an already bleak landscape for parents trying to afford reliable child care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Goerge, Robert; Harris, Allison; Bilaver, Lucy M.; Franzetta, Kerry; Reidy, Mairead; Schexnayder, Deanna; Schroeder, Daniel G.; Staveley, Jane; Kreader, J.L.; Obenski, Sally; Prevost, Ronald C.; Berning, Michael E.; Resnick, Dean M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    This research study analyzes child care subsidy (CCS) participation and employment outcomes among low-income families in Illinois, Maryland, and Texas. The study seeks to learn who among low-income eligible families participates in the child care subsidy program, and the effect of subsidy participation on employment and eligibility status. This study was conducted by a unique collaboration of the U.S. Census Bureau and three University-based research centers using linked individual-level data from the American Community Survey/Supplemental Survey for 2001 (ACS/SS01) and state administrative data. Independent variable included characteristics of program participation, characteristics of the parents, characteristics of the family, and characteristics of the parent’s jobs. Results across all three states demonstrated that those who had received Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) within 3 months of the ACS survey participated in the CCS at higher rates than those who had not received TANF. Results also showed higher levels of participation among younger parents (24...

    This research study analyzes child care subsidy (CCS) participation and employment outcomes among low-income families in Illinois, Maryland, and Texas. The study seeks to learn who among low-income eligible families participates in the child care subsidy program, and the effect of subsidy participation on employment and eligibility status. This study was conducted by a unique collaboration of the U.S. Census Bureau and three University-based research centers using linked individual-level data from the American Community Survey/Supplemental Survey for 2001 (ACS/SS01) and state administrative data. Independent variable included characteristics of program participation, characteristics of the parents, characteristics of the family, and characteristics of the parent’s jobs. Results across all three states demonstrated that those who had received Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) within 3 months of the ACS survey participated in the CCS at higher rates than those who had not received TANF. Results also showed higher levels of participation among younger parents (24 years of age or younger) than older parents (25 years and older). CCS participation was higher among single parents with less than a high school education than among those with at least a high school diploma and among those families who reported having more than 3 children under age 13 in the home. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Matthews, Hannah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This paper provides analysis of state spending on child care assistance in FY 2009 (the most recent year for which data are available) covering the period of October 1, 2008, to September 30, 2009, as well as national trends in child care spending in recent years. In FY 2009, states collectively received $7 billion in federal CCDBG funds: $2 billion in ARRA funds and $5 billion in regular 2009 appropriations. Prior to ARRA, CCDBG had been flat funded for several years. Because ARRA funds were a one-time investment, federal funding for CCDBG dropped back to $5 billion in FY 2010 (see Figure 1). Congress continues to debate FY 2011 funding. A bill passed in the House of Representatives would cut CCDBG funding by $39 million. In addition to CCDBG, states use funds from the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant to provide child care assistance. States have the option of spending TANF funds directly on child care or transferring TANF funds to CCDBG. (author abstract)

    This paper provides analysis of state spending on child care assistance in FY 2009 (the most recent year for which data are available) covering the period of October 1, 2008, to September 30, 2009, as well as national trends in child care spending in recent years. In FY 2009, states collectively received $7 billion in federal CCDBG funds: $2 billion in ARRA funds and $5 billion in regular 2009 appropriations. Prior to ARRA, CCDBG had been flat funded for several years. Because ARRA funds were a one-time investment, federal funding for CCDBG dropped back to $5 billion in FY 2010 (see Figure 1). Congress continues to debate FY 2011 funding. A bill passed in the House of Representatives would cut CCDBG funding by $39 million. In addition to CCDBG, states use funds from the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant to provide child care assistance. States have the option of spending TANF funds directly on child care or transferring TANF funds to CCDBG. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Immervoll, Herwig; Barber, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    Childcare policies play a crucial role in helping parents reconcile care and employment related tasks. This paper quantifies the net cost of purchasing full-time center-based child care in OECD countries taking into account a wide range of influences on household budgets, including fees charged by childcare providers as well as childcare-related tax concessions and cash benefits available to parents. Building on these calculations, family resources are evaluated for different employment situations in order to assess the financial trade-offs between work and staying at home. Results are disaggregated to identify the policy features that present barriers to work for parents whose employment decisions are known to be particularly responsive to financial work incentives: lone parents and second earners with young children requiring care. The results indicate that the cost of purchasing childcare services should be analyzed in conjunction with other social and fiscal policies that affect family incomes. While childcare fees can be very high, high prices may not impede employment if...

    Childcare policies play a crucial role in helping parents reconcile care and employment related tasks. This paper quantifies the net cost of purchasing full-time center-based child care in OECD countries taking into account a wide range of influences on household budgets, including fees charged by childcare providers as well as childcare-related tax concessions and cash benefits available to parents. Building on these calculations, family resources are evaluated for different employment situations in order to assess the financial trade-offs between work and staying at home. Results are disaggregated to identify the policy features that present barriers to work for parents whose employment decisions are known to be particularly responsive to financial work incentives: lone parents and second earners with young children requiring care. The results indicate that the cost of purchasing childcare services should be analyzed in conjunction with other social and fiscal policies that affect family incomes. While childcare fees can be very high, high prices may not impede employment if tax-benefit systems incorporate well-balanced provisions that help parents pay for these services. Conversely, even highly subsidized childcare markets can leave parents with little financial gain from employment if high tax burdens or benefit claw-back rates give rise to adverse work incentives. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schulman, Karen; Blank, Helen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Child care helps children, families, and communities prosper. It gives children the opportunity to learn and develop skills they need to succeed in school and in life. It gives parents the support and peace of mind they need to be productive at work. And, by strengthening the current and future workforce, it helps our nation’s economy. Yet many families, particularly low-income families, struggle to afford child care. The average fee for full-time care ranges from approximately $3,900 to $15,000 a year, depending on where the family lives, the type of care, and the age of the child. Child care assistance can help families with these high child care costs.

    Despite the importance of child care assistance, families in twenty-four states were worse off—having more limited access to assistance and/or receiving more limited benefits from assistance—in February 2013 than in February 2012 under one or more child care assistance policies covered in this report. But families in twenty-seven states were better off under one or more of these policies in February 2013 than in February...

    Child care helps children, families, and communities prosper. It gives children the opportunity to learn and develop skills they need to succeed in school and in life. It gives parents the support and peace of mind they need to be productive at work. And, by strengthening the current and future workforce, it helps our nation’s economy. Yet many families, particularly low-income families, struggle to afford child care. The average fee for full-time care ranges from approximately $3,900 to $15,000 a year, depending on where the family lives, the type of care, and the age of the child. Child care assistance can help families with these high child care costs.

    Despite the importance of child care assistance, families in twenty-four states were worse off—having more limited access to assistance and/or receiving more limited benefits from assistance—in February 2013 than in February 2012 under one or more child care assistance policies covered in this report. But families in twenty-seven states were better off under one or more of these policies in February 2013 than in February 2012. The policies covered are critical in determining families’ ability to obtain child care assistance and the extent of help that assistance offers—income eligibility limits to qualify for child care assistance, waiting lists for child care assistance, copayments required of parents receiving child care assistance, reimbursement rates for child care providers serving families receiving child care assistance, and eligibility for child care assistance for parents searching for a job.

    This year’s trend—with the situation for families improved in slightly more states than in which it worsened—was more positive than in the previous two years, when the situation worsened for families in more states than it improved. In February 2012, families in twenty-seven states were worse off under one or more child care assistance policies covered in this report, and families in seventeen states were better off under one or more of these policies, than in February 2011. In February 2011, families in thirty-seven states were worse off under one or more of these policies, and families in eleven states were better off under one or more of these policies, than in February 2010. (author abstract)

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