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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Johnson, Anna D.; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    The federal child-care subsidy program represents one of the government’s largest investments in early care and education. Using data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Birth Cohort, this study examines associations, among subsidy-eligible families, between child-care subsidy receipt when children are 4 years old and a range of school readiness outcomes in kindergarten (sample n=1,400). Findings suggest that subsidy receipt in preschool is not directly linked to subsequent reading or social-emotional skills. However, subsidy receipt predicted lower math scores among children attending community-based centers. Supplementary analyses revealed that subsidies predicted greater use of center care, but this association did not appear to affect school readiness. (author abstract)

    The federal child-care subsidy program represents one of the government’s largest investments in early care and education. Using data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Birth Cohort, this study examines associations, among subsidy-eligible families, between child-care subsidy receipt when children are 4 years old and a range of school readiness outcomes in kindergarten (sample n=1,400). Findings suggest that subsidy receipt in preschool is not directly linked to subsequent reading or social-emotional skills. However, subsidy receipt predicted lower math scores among children attending community-based centers. Supplementary analyses revealed that subsidies predicted greater use of center care, but this association did not appear to affect school readiness. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Witte, Ann D.; Queralt, Magaly
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    We find that reforms in the Rhode Island subsidized child care program, including income and age eligibility expansions and increases in the reimbursement rates paid to formal providers, significantly increased the likelihood that current and former welfare families: a) would use child care subsidies and b) would work 20 or more hours per week. In addition, these policy changes significantly increased the probability that family heads of household would leave welfare for work. The most powerful impact of the Rhode Island changes in child care policies was on families that had left welfare (i.e., former cash recipients) and that worked at least 20 hours per week. These policy changes had less effect on families receiving cash assistance and enrolled in some approved activity (e.g., education or training) other than work. We were not able to assess the impact of the Rhode Island policy changes on families who were never on cash assistance. However, the large increase in the number of such families receiving child care subsidies after the reforms were instituted suggests that the...

    We find that reforms in the Rhode Island subsidized child care program, including income and age eligibility expansions and increases in the reimbursement rates paid to formal providers, significantly increased the likelihood that current and former welfare families: a) would use child care subsidies and b) would work 20 or more hours per week. In addition, these policy changes significantly increased the probability that family heads of household would leave welfare for work. The most powerful impact of the Rhode Island changes in child care policies was on families that had left welfare (i.e., former cash recipients) and that worked at least 20 hours per week. These policy changes had less effect on families receiving cash assistance and enrolled in some approved activity (e.g., education or training) other than work. We were not able to assess the impact of the Rhode Island policy changes on families who were never on cash assistance. However, the large increase in the number of such families receiving child care subsidies after the reforms were instituted suggests that the impact may have been substantial. We also estimate that Rhode Island's reform of its cash assistance program and of its child care subsidy program, in combination, almost tripled the probability that a typical head of household currently or formerly receiving welfare would work 20 or more hours per week (i.e., the probability increased from 7% in the second quarter of 1996 to 22% in the second quarter of 2000) and almost halved the probability that a single mother in the sample would be on cash assistance and neither working nor in some other approved activity (i.e., such probability decreased from 47% in the second quarter of 1996 to 25% in the second quarter of 2000).  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Davis, Elizabeth E.; Jefferys, Marcie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    The cost of child care can be a major barrier to employment for families with low incomes. To make child care more affordable, Minnesota provides financial subsidies through the Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) for low-income working parents. Child care assistance supports the goal of welfare reform by supporting work.

    In July 2004 the Minnesota Child Care Policy Research Partnership (MCCPRP) published a report examining the employment patterns and earnings of families receiving child care assistance in four counties in Minnesota. This follow-up study builds on that report by examining the same families’ employment patterns and earnings growth over a three-year period (2001-2003).The families in the study received child care assistance in the first quarter of 2001, but may or may not have continued accessing CCAP during the followup period. The study’s main objective was to increase understanding of the employment situation of parents who rely on child care assistance and to assess whether these families are moving toward economic self-sufficiency. (author abstract)...

    The cost of child care can be a major barrier to employment for families with low incomes. To make child care more affordable, Minnesota provides financial subsidies through the Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) for low-income working parents. Child care assistance supports the goal of welfare reform by supporting work.

    In July 2004 the Minnesota Child Care Policy Research Partnership (MCCPRP) published a report examining the employment patterns and earnings of families receiving child care assistance in four counties in Minnesota. This follow-up study builds on that report by examining the same families’ employment patterns and earnings growth over a three-year period (2001-2003).The families in the study received child care assistance in the first quarter of 2001, but may or may not have continued accessing CCAP during the followup period. The study’s main objective was to increase understanding of the employment situation of parents who rely on child care assistance and to assess whether these families are moving toward economic self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kinsey, Dinan; Briggs, Jodie
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2008

    Houston families are working harder than ever. In fact, more than 75 percent of the children living in low-income families in Houston have parents who are employed, and the majority of these children – about 400,000 – have parents who work fulltime, year-round. But, despite their best efforts, these parents are struggling to afford the most basic necessities for their families. In Houston, as elsewhere in Texas and the United States, a full-time job at low wages is not enough to make ends meet.

    Work supports such as the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and public health insurance can help narrow the gap between low earnings and the cost of basic expenses. But a critical Texas work support – child care assistance – is woefully under-funded and therefore out of reach for many qualified families. This fact sheet finds that child care is one of the largest expenses working families face, and unless they receive help with the cost of care, low-wage working parents remain unable to afford basic family necessities. (author abstract)

    Houston families are working harder than ever. In fact, more than 75 percent of the children living in low-income families in Houston have parents who are employed, and the majority of these children – about 400,000 – have parents who work fulltime, year-round. But, despite their best efforts, these parents are struggling to afford the most basic necessities for their families. In Houston, as elsewhere in Texas and the United States, a full-time job at low wages is not enough to make ends meet.

    Work supports such as the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and public health insurance can help narrow the gap between low earnings and the cost of basic expenses. But a critical Texas work support – child care assistance – is woefully under-funded and therefore out of reach for many qualified families. This fact sheet finds that child care is one of the largest expenses working families face, and unless they receive help with the cost of care, low-wage working parents remain unable to afford basic family necessities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Davis, Elizabeth E. ; Grobe, Deana ; Weber, Roberta B.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    Local economic disparities, particularly lower average wages, higher overall unemployment rates and higher poverty rates may lead to rural–urban differences in the use of public programs designed to support working low-income families. This study analyzes the dynamics of program participation and employment stability for rural and urban families in the Oregon childcare subsidy program. While families' demographic characteristics, employment stability, and participation in work support programs were similar, families in rural noncore counties tended to make less use of public assistance, including childcare subsidies, food stamps and welfare, than did families in metropolitan and micropolitan counties. (author abstract)

    Local economic disparities, particularly lower average wages, higher overall unemployment rates and higher poverty rates may lead to rural–urban differences in the use of public programs designed to support working low-income families. This study analyzes the dynamics of program participation and employment stability for rural and urban families in the Oregon childcare subsidy program. While families' demographic characteristics, employment stability, and participation in work support programs were similar, families in rural noncore counties tended to make less use of public assistance, including childcare subsidies, food stamps and welfare, than did families in metropolitan and micropolitan counties. (author abstract)

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