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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality; The Russell Sage Foundation
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2013

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

  • Individual Author: Livermore, Gina; Hoffman, Denise; Bardos, Maura
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In July 2008, we implemented regulation changes to the Ticket to Work (TTW) program to increase the financial incentives for service providers to participate in the program. This report compares the characteristics and outcomes of two groups of TTW participants – those who assigned their Tickets before we implemented the revised regulations, and those who assigned their Tickets after. In this report, we assess whether the group that assigned their Tickets before the regulation changes is the same or different from the group that assigned their Tickets after in terms of the characteristics of beneficiaries, the types and intensity of services received, the employment expectations and outcomes of TTW participants, and participant satisfaction with TTW. We also provide updated information about the characteristics and employment-related outcomes of TTW participants based on data in the 2010 National Beneficiary Survey (NBS), analogous to the detailed statistics on TTW participants based on earlier rounds of the NBS and presented in previous TTW evaluation reports.

    This is the...

    In July 2008, we implemented regulation changes to the Ticket to Work (TTW) program to increase the financial incentives for service providers to participate in the program. This report compares the characteristics and outcomes of two groups of TTW participants – those who assigned their Tickets before we implemented the revised regulations, and those who assigned their Tickets after. In this report, we assess whether the group that assigned their Tickets before the regulation changes is the same or different from the group that assigned their Tickets after in terms of the characteristics of beneficiaries, the types and intensity of services received, the employment expectations and outcomes of TTW participants, and participant satisfaction with TTW. We also provide updated information about the characteristics and employment-related outcomes of TTW participants based on data in the 2010 National Beneficiary Survey (NBS), analogous to the detailed statistics on TTW participants based on earlier rounds of the NBS and presented in previous TTW evaluation reports.

    This is the fifth in a series of reports that make up the seventh Ticket to Work evaluation report. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Livermore, Gina; Stapleton, David; Roche, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    This report presents a profile of all working-age (age 18 to 64) SSI and DI beneficiaries. It is the second in a series of reports that make up the fifth Ticket to Work evaluation report. The report focuses on selected personal characteristics, activities, and outcomes closely associated with employment. The profile is based on data from a recent nationally representative survey of working-age SSI and DI beneficiaries Because of important differences between SSI and DI program eligibility criteria, target populations, and treatment of earnings, we also present separate profiles for SSI-only, DI-only, and concurrent (those receiving both SSI and DI) beneficiaries.

    The period of analysis is prior to SSA’s implementation of new Ticket to Work program regulations in July of 2008, and so reflects experiences under the original Ticket to Work rules. The findings indicate that many SSI and DI beneficiaries were working and engaging in work-preparation activities, and many more saw themselves working in the future. In 2006, about half of all beneficiaries reported having work-...

    This report presents a profile of all working-age (age 18 to 64) SSI and DI beneficiaries. It is the second in a series of reports that make up the fifth Ticket to Work evaluation report. The report focuses on selected personal characteristics, activities, and outcomes closely associated with employment. The profile is based on data from a recent nationally representative survey of working-age SSI and DI beneficiaries Because of important differences between SSI and DI program eligibility criteria, target populations, and treatment of earnings, we also present separate profiles for SSI-only, DI-only, and concurrent (those receiving both SSI and DI) beneficiaries.

    The period of analysis is prior to SSA’s implementation of new Ticket to Work program regulations in July of 2008, and so reflects experiences under the original Ticket to Work rules. The findings indicate that many SSI and DI beneficiaries were working and engaging in work-preparation activities, and many more saw themselves working in the future. In 2006, about half of all beneficiaries reported having work-related goals or expectations, had recently received employment-related services or training, and/or had recently been employed. But the jobs secured by beneficiaries did not pay well in general; nor did they offer much in the way of benefits.

    Although many beneficiaries were working, and many more wanted to work, the findings also indicate that there was a high prevalence of certain characteristics, circumstances, and experiences among beneficiaries that stood between them and employment. Other barriers included the fact that few beneficiaries were aware of the work incentive provisions available in the SSI and DI programs, and most were living in households at or near the federal poverty level. As a result, they and their families relied on means-tested public programs for which eligibility could be jeopardized by earnings. Despite these barriers to employment, the large share of beneficiaries who indicated an interest in employment—either through their actions or expectations—suggests that policies designed to promote and support work might be successful if they can address the wide array of obstacles facing beneficiaries in their attempts to work and contribute to their own independence. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Osilla, Karen O.; Van Busum, Kristin R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    As large numbers of service members and veterans, many with serious injuries, return from Iraq and Afghanistan, it is critical to examine the types of return-to-work resources available to help wounded warriors obtain and retain gainful employment and to understand the effectiveness of these programs. RAND researchers examined existing return-to-work policies and programs for military men and women with service-related injuries and conducted an initial review of the available literature on return-to-work resources, focusing when possible on policies and programs specifically available for service members and veterans with physical injuries. The Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs should seek to build the evidence base concerning return-to-work programs, in order to understand which programs are most effective, which provide a return on investment, and what strategies are needed to encourage service members and veterans to utilize them (e.g., coordination). The DoD and the VA have been and will continue to be held accountable for the...

    As large numbers of service members and veterans, many with serious injuries, return from Iraq and Afghanistan, it is critical to examine the types of return-to-work resources available to help wounded warriors obtain and retain gainful employment and to understand the effectiveness of these programs. RAND researchers examined existing return-to-work policies and programs for military men and women with service-related injuries and conducted an initial review of the available literature on return-to-work resources, focusing when possible on policies and programs specifically available for service members and veterans with physical injuries. The Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs should seek to build the evidence base concerning return-to-work programs, in order to understand which programs are most effective, which provide a return on investment, and what strategies are needed to encourage service members and veterans to utilize them (e.g., coordination). The DoD and the VA have been and will continue to be held accountable for the successful reintegration of service members and veterans who have been injured while serving. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wittenburg, David; Fraker, Thomas; Stapleton, David; Thornton, Craig; Gregory, Jesse; Mamun, Arif
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    This paper presents estimates of Ticket to Work's (TTW) impacts on service enrollment, earnings, and benefit amounts during the first two years of program implementation in Phases 1 and 2 states. We estimated impacts using a longitudinal fixed effects model that tracked changes in outcomes of 4.7 million beneficiaries with disabilities covering the period from the year before the Phase 1 Ticket mailing in 2001 and continuing through the end of 2003. Our impact estimates indicate that TTW had a small impact on promoting service enrollment during the first year of TTW rollout. We find no compelling evidence that TTW affected beneficiary earnings and benefits during its first two years. Our impact findings for all outcomes are consistent with the expectation that changes in service enrollment would occur before changes in either earnings or benefit receipt. Additionally, the relatively small size of the service enrollment impacts is consistent with the low TTW participation rate, which was less than 1 percent during the first year of the rollout in Phase 1. Given the anticipated...

    This paper presents estimates of Ticket to Work's (TTW) impacts on service enrollment, earnings, and benefit amounts during the first two years of program implementation in Phases 1 and 2 states. We estimated impacts using a longitudinal fixed effects model that tracked changes in outcomes of 4.7 million beneficiaries with disabilities covering the period from the year before the Phase 1 Ticket mailing in 2001 and continuing through the end of 2003. Our impact estimates indicate that TTW had a small impact on promoting service enrollment during the first year of TTW rollout. We find no compelling evidence that TTW affected beneficiary earnings and benefits during its first two years. Our impact findings for all outcomes are consistent with the expectation that changes in service enrollment would occur before changes in either earnings or benefit receipt. Additionally, the relatively small size of the service enrollment impacts is consistent with the low TTW participation rate, which was less than 1 percent during the first year of the rollout in Phase 1. Given the anticipated timing of impacts and the relatively small size of the service enrollment impacts, it is not surprising that we find no compelling evidence of subsequent impacts on earnings and benefit amounts at this early stage. (author abstract)

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