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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Meeting the goals outlined in Opening Doors: Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness requires targeted investments in proven solutions. Years of research and evaluation have identified several evidence-based best practices for preventing and ending homelessness, and important research continues to be conducted throughout the Federal Government and across the nation. As we strive to expand and strengthen our knowledge base, there are still many areas—particularly for homeless subgroups such as unaccompanied youth—where research is needed to inform the policy-making process as well as to better understand best practices in the field.

    In late 2011, the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH, or the Council) assembled and reviewed over 200 studies on homelessness conducted between 1989 and 2011 and more than 30 additional studies by USICH member agencies that were in the implementation stage. These studies were mapped against the objectives and strategies in Opening Doors to help identify key gaps in our knowledge base. This research agenda...

    Meeting the goals outlined in Opening Doors: Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness requires targeted investments in proven solutions. Years of research and evaluation have identified several evidence-based best practices for preventing and ending homelessness, and important research continues to be conducted throughout the Federal Government and across the nation. As we strive to expand and strengthen our knowledge base, there are still many areas—particularly for homeless subgroups such as unaccompanied youth—where research is needed to inform the policy-making process as well as to better understand best practices in the field.

    In late 2011, the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH, or the Council) assembled and reviewed over 200 studies on homelessness conducted between 1989 and 2011 and more than 30 additional studies by USICH member agencies that were in the implementation stage. These studies were mapped against the objectives and strategies in Opening Doors to help identify key gaps in our knowledge base. This research agenda highlights priority topics for new research within eight key domains:

    • Affordable and supportive housing
    • Cost offsets/cost effectiveness
    • Homeless crisis response
    • Homelessness prevalence and risk and protective factors
    • Improving health, well-being, and stability
    • Justice linkages
    • Accessing mainstream benefits
    • Pathways to employment

    The Council hopes that both funders and researchers will use this agenda to guide their choices about future investments in research. The research questions provided are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather illustrative. In some cases, a single study may address all of the questions posed within a topic area, while in other cases, multiple studies may be required.

    Although some of the topics will require a national or multi-site study, many of the proposed topics are important for local research and can have significant impact on local policy and funding decisions. As such, the Council encourages cities and counties across the country to partner with local universities and other interested organizations to undertake research on topics of particular policy relevance to their communities and to publicize local solutions so that other communities may benefit. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Nightingale, Demetra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    This brief summarizes key findings from several important fatherhood initiatives that were developed and implemented during the 1990s and early 2000s.  Formal evaluations of these fatherhood efforts have been completed, some quite recently, making this an opportune time to step back and assess what has been learned and how policy makers and program managers can build on the early programs’ successes and challenges.  The brief highlights lessons from:  the Young Unwed Fathers Project, Parents’ Fair Share (PFS), Welfare-to-Work Grant (WtW) Programs, Responsible Fatherhood Programs (RFP), and Partners for Fragile Families (PFF). (author abstract)

    This brief summarizes key findings from several important fatherhood initiatives that were developed and implemented during the 1990s and early 2000s.  Formal evaluations of these fatherhood efforts have been completed, some quite recently, making this an opportune time to step back and assess what has been learned and how policy makers and program managers can build on the early programs’ successes and challenges.  The brief highlights lessons from:  the Young Unwed Fathers Project, Parents’ Fair Share (PFS), Welfare-to-Work Grant (WtW) Programs, Responsible Fatherhood Programs (RFP), and Partners for Fragile Families (PFF). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: TANF Faith-Based and Community Organizations Initiative
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2011

    This cross-site analysis examines all 8 of the exemplary FBCO-TANF partnerships described in the project’s case studies, by drawing out important findings related to volunteer management, organizational infrastructure, inter-agency communication, and place-based strategies. Moreover, the 14-page report articulates some of the leading reasons a TANF agency would want to partner with an FBCO, and it describes how effective partnerships can emerge. (author abstract)

    This cross-site analysis examines all 8 of the exemplary FBCO-TANF partnerships described in the project’s case studies, by drawing out important findings related to volunteer management, organizational infrastructure, inter-agency communication, and place-based strategies. Moreover, the 14-page report articulates some of the leading reasons a TANF agency would want to partner with an FBCO, and it describes how effective partnerships can emerge. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kisker, Ellen E.; Maynard, Rebecca A.; Rangarajan, Anu; Boller, Kimberly
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1998

    Mothers who have their first child as a teenager are more likely than older mothers to go on welfare, and they spend more years on welfare over their lifetimes. Thus, they are a special focus of the most recent welfare reform legislation, which imposes strict new requirements on teenage parents. State and local agencies charged with implementing these requirements may find the lessons from three recent evaluations useful. The three recent demonstration evaluations -- of the Teenage Parent Demonstration; Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting Program (LEAP); and the New Chance demonstration -- offer important lessons for states and local agencies that are implementing the teenage parent provisions of the new law. (author abstract)

    Mothers who have their first child as a teenager are more likely than older mothers to go on welfare, and they spend more years on welfare over their lifetimes. Thus, they are a special focus of the most recent welfare reform legislation, which imposes strict new requirements on teenage parents. State and local agencies charged with implementing these requirements may find the lessons from three recent evaluations useful. The three recent demonstration evaluations -- of the Teenage Parent Demonstration; Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting Program (LEAP); and the New Chance demonstration -- offer important lessons for states and local agencies that are implementing the teenage parent provisions of the new law. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    Various economic factors present labor market challenges to both low-skill job seekers and the business community that needs a skilled work force. The issues are discussed in the beginning of the report and then various programs that address these issues are explored. Incumbent worker training, career pathways, bridge programming, industry–based certification and sectoral training are examined with specific program examples described. The strategies common to successful programs included:

    • Develop an understanding of employers’ workforce needs;
    • Emphasize issues important to businesses;
    • Carefully consider which industries and employers to include;
    • Obtain employer contributions to the project so they invest in the success;
    • Involve employers in the design and provision of the training;
    • Demonstrate the effectiveness of training to the employers;
    • Provide high quality services;
    • Develop stable funding sources.

    (author abstract)

    Various economic factors present labor market challenges to both low-skill job seekers and the business community that needs a skilled work force. The issues are discussed in the beginning of the report and then various programs that address these issues are explored. Incumbent worker training, career pathways, bridge programming, industry–based certification and sectoral training are examined with specific program examples described. The strategies common to successful programs included:

    • Develop an understanding of employers’ workforce needs;
    • Emphasize issues important to businesses;
    • Carefully consider which industries and employers to include;
    • Obtain employer contributions to the project so they invest in the success;
    • Involve employers in the design and provision of the training;
    • Demonstrate the effectiveness of training to the employers;
    • Provide high quality services;
    • Develop stable funding sources.

    (author abstract)

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