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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wilkins, Carol; Burt, Martha
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In October 2010, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), contracted with Abt Associates Inc. for a study to explore the roles that Medicaid, Community Health Centers, and other HHS programs might play in providing services linked to housing for people who experience chronic homelessness through Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH). PSH provides a permanent home for formerly homeless people with disabilities, along with the health care and other supportive services needed to help tenants adjust to living in housing and make the changes in their lives that will help them keep their housing. It differs from group homes, board and care facilities, and other treatment programs in that most tenants hold their own leases, and keeping their housing is usually not contingent on their participating in services or remaining at a certain level of illness. The research team produced four issue papers on promising practices linking health, mental health, and substance abuse services to housing assistance for the target population...

    In October 2010, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), contracted with Abt Associates Inc. for a study to explore the roles that Medicaid, Community Health Centers, and other HHS programs might play in providing services linked to housing for people who experience chronic homelessness through Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH). PSH provides a permanent home for formerly homeless people with disabilities, along with the health care and other supportive services needed to help tenants adjust to living in housing and make the changes in their lives that will help them keep their housing. It differs from group homes, board and care facilities, and other treatment programs in that most tenants hold their own leases, and keeping their housing is usually not contingent on their participating in services or remaining at a certain level of illness. The research team produced four issue papers on promising practices linking health, mental health, and substance abuse services to housing assistance for the target population of chronically homeless people. This issue paper focuses on the roles that public housing agencies (PHAs) can play in expanding opportunities for chronically homeless people to move into housing, including the participation of PHAs in expanding the supply of PSH. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Orr, Larry; Feins, Judith D.; Jacob, Robin; Beecroft, Erik; Sanbonmatsu, Lisa; Katz, Lawrence F.; Liebman, Jeffrey B.; Kling, Jeffrey R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The Moving to Opportunity for Fair Housing Demonstration Interim Impacts Evaluation provides insights into what benefits can be achieved by improving the neighborhoods of poor families. The Moving to Opportunity program provided thousands of poor adults and children an opportunity to use HUD vouchers to move out of public housing in high poverty neighborhoods to lower poverty neighborhoods. Using rigorous scientific methods, this study looks at the impact these moves have had on housing, health, employment, education, mobility, welfare receipt, and delinquency.

    The results presented in this report show the impacts of moving to lower poverty approximately 5-years after the move. Within this relatively short timeframe, moving to lower poverty has had significant positive impacts on:

    • personal safety;
    • housing quality;
    • mental health and obesity among adults; and
    • mental health, staying in school, delinquency, and risky behavior among teenage girls.

    There are, however, apparently some negative effects on boys' behavior, and no...

    The Moving to Opportunity for Fair Housing Demonstration Interim Impacts Evaluation provides insights into what benefits can be achieved by improving the neighborhoods of poor families. The Moving to Opportunity program provided thousands of poor adults and children an opportunity to use HUD vouchers to move out of public housing in high poverty neighborhoods to lower poverty neighborhoods. Using rigorous scientific methods, this study looks at the impact these moves have had on housing, health, employment, education, mobility, welfare receipt, and delinquency.

    The results presented in this report show the impacts of moving to lower poverty approximately 5-years after the move. Within this relatively short timeframe, moving to lower poverty has had significant positive impacts on:

    • personal safety;
    • housing quality;
    • mental health and obesity among adults; and
    • mental health, staying in school, delinquency, and risky behavior among teenage girls.

    There are, however, apparently some negative effects on boys' behavior, and no statistically significant effects on employment outcomes for adults or educational achievement for children. Only marginal improvements were found in the quality of schools attended. (author abstract)

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