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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sorensen, Elaine; Pashi, Arthur; Morales, Melody
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report uses the latest data available from the U.S. Census Bureau to describe custodial families served by the IV-D program, a federally mandated program that promotes parental responsibility and family self-sufficiency by providing families with child support services. (Excerpt from author summary)

    This report uses the latest data available from the U.S. Census Bureau to describe custodial families served by the IV-D program, a federally mandated program that promotes parental responsibility and family self-sufficiency by providing families with child support services. (Excerpt from author summary)

  • Individual Author: Mage, Caroline; Baird, Peter; Miller, Cynthia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2019

    This study brief describes an alternative to the civil contempt process intended to increase engagement and consistent and reliable payments among noncompliant noncustodial parents. The Procedural Justice-Informed Alternatives to Contempt (PJAC) demonstration project was developed by OCSE to adapt and apply principles of procedural justice to child support compliance eforts. Procedural justice is also referred to as procedural fairness. It is “the idea that how individuals regard the justice system is tied more to the perceived fairness of the process and how they were treated rather than to the perceived fairness of the outcome.” This approach has produced notable increases in compliance and long term rule-following behavior in criminal justice and judicial settings. (Excerpt from author introduction)

    This study brief describes an alternative to the civil contempt process intended to increase engagement and consistent and reliable payments among noncompliant noncustodial parents. The Procedural Justice-Informed Alternatives to Contempt (PJAC) demonstration project was developed by OCSE to adapt and apply principles of procedural justice to child support compliance eforts. Procedural justice is also referred to as procedural fairness. It is “the idea that how individuals regard the justice system is tied more to the perceived fairness of the process and how they were treated rather than to the perceived fairness of the outcome.” This approach has produced notable increases in compliance and long term rule-following behavior in criminal justice and judicial settings. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: The President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Lead exposure has been linked to a number of health effects in children. The United States has made tremendous progress in reducing lead exposure, resulting in lower childhood blood lead levels over time. This progress has resulted, in part, from the enforcement of multiple U.S. regulations and implementation of numerous federal programs that aim to reduce childhood lead exposures or ameliorate its effects.

    Today, about 3.6 million U.S. families with a child under age 6 years live in a home with one or more conditions that can expose their child to levels of lead that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) considers hazardous. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses a reference level of  5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood (ug/dL) to identify children whose blood lead levels are much higher than most children’s levels and recommend initiation of public health actions. Approximately 500,000 children ages 1 to 5 years exceed the reference level, which is based on the U.S. population of children ages 1 to  5 years who are in the highest 2.5%...

    Lead exposure has been linked to a number of health effects in children. The United States has made tremendous progress in reducing lead exposure, resulting in lower childhood blood lead levels over time. This progress has resulted, in part, from the enforcement of multiple U.S. regulations and implementation of numerous federal programs that aim to reduce childhood lead exposures or ameliorate its effects.

    Today, about 3.6 million U.S. families with a child under age 6 years live in a home with one or more conditions that can expose their child to levels of lead that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) considers hazardous. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses a reference level of  5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood (ug/dL) to identify children whose blood lead levels are much higher than most children’s levels and recommend initiation of public health actions. Approximately 500,000 children ages 1 to 5 years exceed the reference level, which is based on the U.S. population of children ages 1 to  5 years who are in the highest 2.5% of children when tested for lead in their blood. However, no safe blood lead level in children has been identified. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Dunifon, Rachel; Hynes, Kathryn; Peters, H. Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    This paper uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to examine how the pre- and post-1996 welfare reforms influence measures of children's well-being. Despite a large body of research relating welfare reform policies to family structure, employment, and income, fewer studies have used econometric methods on data from multiple states to examine how changes in welfare policies in the pre- and post-TANF periods have influenced children. The results from this study have the potential to shed light on whether policy choices adopted by states are related to children's well-being. Overall, the results do not show evidence that state welfare policies are systematically associated with parenting behavior or child outcomes. (author abstract)

    This paper uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to examine how the pre- and post-1996 welfare reforms influence measures of children's well-being. Despite a large body of research relating welfare reform policies to family structure, employment, and income, fewer studies have used econometric methods on data from multiple states to examine how changes in welfare policies in the pre- and post-TANF periods have influenced children. The results from this study have the potential to shed light on whether policy choices adopted by states are related to children's well-being. Overall, the results do not show evidence that state welfare policies are systematically associated with parenting behavior or child outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gurmu, Shiferaw; Ihlanfeldt, Keith R.; Smith, William J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    We study the factors affecting the employment probability of temporary assistance for needy families (TANF) recipients using recent quarterly panel data from Atlanta, Georgia. A central focus of our study is to determine whether the TANF recipient's proximity to job opportunity and the availability of childcare affect her probability of full-time employment. Both static and dynamic models of employment choice are estimated that control for unobserved individual effects. We estimate models separately for a sub-sample of TANF recipients living in public housing, whose residential locations can be considered exogenously determined. We find substantial evidence that individuals and family characteristics (such as, the education of the recipient and the number of children and adults in her family) are important determinants of the employment probability of welfare recipients. On the other hand, location related variables are found to be relatively unimportant. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a...

    We study the factors affecting the employment probability of temporary assistance for needy families (TANF) recipients using recent quarterly panel data from Atlanta, Georgia. A central focus of our study is to determine whether the TANF recipient's proximity to job opportunity and the availability of childcare affect her probability of full-time employment. Both static and dynamic models of employment choice are estimated that control for unobserved individual effects. We estimate models separately for a sub-sample of TANF recipients living in public housing, whose residential locations can be considered exogenously determined. We find substantial evidence that individuals and family characteristics (such as, the education of the recipient and the number of children and adults in her family) are important determinants of the employment probability of welfare recipients. On the other hand, location related variables are found to be relatively unimportant. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research.

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