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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Carnevale, Anthony P.; Cheah, Ban
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In the past, a college degree all but assured job seekers employment and high earnings, but today, what you make depends on what you take. In Hard Times 2013, we show differences in unemployment and earnings based on major for BA and graduate degree holders. We show that STEM — Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics — majors typically offer the best opportunities for employment and earnings, while unemployment is higher for graduates with non-technical degrees.

    Here are some of our major findings:

    1. Even as the housing bubble seems to be dissipating, unemployment rates for recent architecture graduates have remained high (12.8%). Graduate degrees and work experience did not shield these graduates from a sector-specific shock; graduates with experience in the field have the same jobless rates as the economy overall (9.3%).

    2. Unemployment is generally higher for non-technical majors, such as the arts (9.8%) or law and public policy (9.2%).

    3. People who make technology are still better off than people who use technology. Unemployment rates...

    In the past, a college degree all but assured job seekers employment and high earnings, but today, what you make depends on what you take. In Hard Times 2013, we show differences in unemployment and earnings based on major for BA and graduate degree holders. We show that STEM — Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics — majors typically offer the best opportunities for employment and earnings, while unemployment is higher for graduates with non-technical degrees.

    Here are some of our major findings:

    1. Even as the housing bubble seems to be dissipating, unemployment rates for recent architecture graduates have remained high (12.8%). Graduate degrees and work experience did not shield these graduates from a sector-specific shock; graduates with experience in the field have the same jobless rates as the economy overall (9.3%).

    2. Unemployment is generally higher for non-technical majors, such as the arts (9.8%) or law and public policy (9.2%).

    3. People who make technology are still better off than people who use technology. Unemployment rates for recent graduates in information systems, concentrated in clerical functions, is high (14.7%) compared with mathematics (5.9%) and computer science (8.7%).

    4. Unemployment rates are relatively low for recent graduates in education (5.0%), engineering (7.0%), health and the sciences (4.8%) because they are tied to stable or growing industry sectors and occupations.

    5. Graduates in psychology and social work also have relatively low rates (8.8%) because almost half of them work in healthcare or education sectors.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wauchope, Barbara; Jaffee, Elenor; Lyons, Kristen; Lutz, Aimee Delaney
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The information in this New Hampshire Kids Count Cities Data Book is primarily a story about children living in these large communities. However; to ensure we describe children from across the state, we include several smaller, more rural towns as well.

    The NH Kids Count Cities Data Book expands on the 2010/2011 New Hampshire Kids Count Data Book which reported state and county level data. This book focuses on fourteen cities and towns in our state reporting on 24 indicators of child well-being. Together these two New Hampshire publications provide a nuanced perspective of Granite State children and young adults, portraying areas of accomplishment as well as areas of need among the children and families of our state. (Author abstract)

    The information in this New Hampshire Kids Count Cities Data Book is primarily a story about children living in these large communities. However; to ensure we describe children from across the state, we include several smaller, more rural towns as well.

    The NH Kids Count Cities Data Book expands on the 2010/2011 New Hampshire Kids Count Data Book which reported state and county level data. This book focuses on fourteen cities and towns in our state reporting on 24 indicators of child well-being. Together these two New Hampshire publications provide a nuanced perspective of Granite State children and young adults, portraying areas of accomplishment as well as areas of need among the children and families of our state. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bradley, M. C.; Lansing, Jiffy; Stagner, Matthew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Promising occupations for at-risk youth provide sufficient compensation and could put them on a path to becoming independent adults. To identify promising occupations, this brief examined four key features: 1) median earnings level, 2) education and training pre-requisites, 3) projected growth in labor-market demand, and 4) potential for individual advancement. Based on these criteria, opportunities in two fields are highlighted – health care and construction.  A number of work-based learning and career pathway programs are also discussed, including ACF’s Health Profession Opportunity Grants program. This brief was written as part of ACF’s Youth Demonstration Development project being conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and the Chapin Hall Center for Children. (author abstract)

    Promising occupations for at-risk youth provide sufficient compensation and could put them on a path to becoming independent adults. To identify promising occupations, this brief examined four key features: 1) median earnings level, 2) education and training pre-requisites, 3) projected growth in labor-market demand, and 4) potential for individual advancement. Based on these criteria, opportunities in two fields are highlighted – health care and construction.  A number of work-based learning and career pathway programs are also discussed, including ACF’s Health Profession Opportunity Grants program. This brief was written as part of ACF’s Youth Demonstration Development project being conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and the Chapin Hall Center for Children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Butrica, Barbara; Smith, Karen E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Minority and divorced women have historically experienced double-digit poverty rates in retirement, and demographic trends will increase their representation in future retiree populations. We might expect an increase in the proportion of economically vulnerable divorced women in the future. Factors associated with higher retirement incomes include having a college degree; having strong labor force attachment; receiving Social Security benefits; and having pensions, retirement accounts, or assets, regardless of race and ethnicity. Because divorced minority women are less likely than divorced white women to have these attributes, their projected average retirement incomes are lower than those of divorced white women. (author abstract)

    Minority and divorced women have historically experienced double-digit poverty rates in retirement, and demographic trends will increase their representation in future retiree populations. We might expect an increase in the proportion of economically vulnerable divorced women in the future. Factors associated with higher retirement incomes include having a college degree; having strong labor force attachment; receiving Social Security benefits; and having pensions, retirement accounts, or assets, regardless of race and ethnicity. Because divorced minority women are less likely than divorced white women to have these attributes, their projected average retirement incomes are lower than those of divorced white women. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nichols, Austin
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    Individuals who finished college were far less likely to live in households where any member received public assistance than those with less education, both before and after the Great Recession. The rates of receipt of aid in households of advanced degree holders roughly doubled between 2007 and 2010, but still remained under two percent. The rate for those with less than a high school education was 22 percent, and for high school graduates the rate is 13 percent, increasing by 8 and 6 percentage points, respectively, since 2007. The increases were in food assistance, not cash assistance. (author abstract)

    Individuals who finished college were far less likely to live in households where any member received public assistance than those with less education, both before and after the Great Recession. The rates of receipt of aid in households of advanced degree holders roughly doubled between 2007 and 2010, but still remained under two percent. The rate for those with less than a high school education was 22 percent, and for high school graduates the rate is 13 percent, increasing by 8 and 6 percentage points, respectively, since 2007. The increases were in food assistance, not cash assistance. (author abstract)

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