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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Gibbs, Deborah; Kasten, Jennifer; Bir, Anupa; Hoover, Sonja; Duncan, Dean; Mitchell, Janet
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    Since the establishment of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, much attention has been given to reductions in the number of welfare cases. Welfare cases declined nationally by 52 percent between 1996 and 2001; however, child-only cases declined by much less. Thus, while the number of child-only cases has fluctuated over time, their proportionate share of the TANF caseload has increased. Children in TANF child-only cases with relative caregivers occupy uncertain territory between the TANF and the child welfare service systems. Since these children are exempt from work requirements and not expected to move to self-sufficiency prior to adulthood, they are not well aligned with the TANF agency’s expectations and service offerings. Because they have not been identified as having experienced maltreatment, they are outside the child welfare system’s protective mandate, although they may be in need of supportive services. (author abstract)

    Since the establishment of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, much attention has been given to reductions in the number of welfare cases. Welfare cases declined nationally by 52 percent between 1996 and 2001; however, child-only cases declined by much less. Thus, while the number of child-only cases has fluctuated over time, their proportionate share of the TANF caseload has increased. Children in TANF child-only cases with relative caregivers occupy uncertain territory between the TANF and the child welfare service systems. Since these children are exempt from work requirements and not expected to move to self-sufficiency prior to adulthood, they are not well aligned with the TANF agency’s expectations and service offerings. Because they have not been identified as having experienced maltreatment, they are outside the child welfare system’s protective mandate, although they may be in need of supportive services. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Shattuck, Rachel M.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.

  • Individual Author: Stagner, Matthew; Vogel, Lisa Klein; Knas, Emily; Fung, Nickie; Worthington, Julie; Bradley, M. C.; D'Angelo, Angela; Gothro, Andrew; Powers, Courtney
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007). To expand this evidence base, the Children’s Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) developed a multi-phase grant initiative for planning, implementing, and evaluating comprehensive service models intended to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults with child welfare involvement. The funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for the first phase of this initiative was called “Planning Grants to Develop a Model Intervention for Youth/Young Adults with Child Welfare Involvement At Risk of Homelessness” (Phase I).

    In September 2013, the start of the first phase, CB awarded 18 two-year planning grants, each worth up to $360,000 per year. Grantees were to focus on three populations: (1) adolescents who enter foster care between 14 and 17, (2) young...

    Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007). To expand this evidence base, the Children’s Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) developed a multi-phase grant initiative for planning, implementing, and evaluating comprehensive service models intended to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults with child welfare involvement. The funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for the first phase of this initiative was called “Planning Grants to Develop a Model Intervention for Youth/Young Adults with Child Welfare Involvement At Risk of Homelessness” (Phase I).

    In September 2013, the start of the first phase, CB awarded 18 two-year planning grants, each worth up to $360,000 per year. Grantees were to focus on three populations: (1) adolescents who enter foster care between 14 and 17, (2) young adults aging out of foster care, and (3) homeless youth/young adults with foster care histories up to 21.

    The focus of this report is a process study of Phase I. The report documents the activities and progress grantees made over the course of the planning period. (Edited author executive summary)

     

  • Individual Author: Knas, Emily; Stagner, Matthew; Bradley, M.C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

    YARH is built on the Federal Framework to End Youth Homelessness, which was published in 2013 by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH). The goals of the framework are to guide the development of data strategies that are intended to reveal the size and characteristics of the homeless youth population and to support the development of local capacity to prevent youth homelessness. The USICH framework targets the population of youth at risk of homelessness and suggests that the Preliminary Intervention Model be used to address this issue.

    The model focuses on four core outcomes: (1) housing, (2) permanent connections, (3) education and employment, and (4) social-emotional well-being. YARH is the first test of the framework...

    The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

    YARH is built on the Federal Framework to End Youth Homelessness, which was published in 2013 by the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH). The goals of the framework are to guide the development of data strategies that are intended to reveal the size and characteristics of the homeless youth population and to support the development of local capacity to prevent youth homelessness. The USICH framework targets the population of youth at risk of homelessness and suggests that the Preliminary Intervention Model be used to address this issue.

    The model focuses on four core outcomes: (1) housing, (2) permanent connections, (3) education and employment, and (4) social-emotional well-being. YARH is the first test of the framework in practice. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Klein Vogel, Lisa ; Bradley, M. C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood. It presents a data strategy, a capacity strategy, and an intervention model designed to prevent and eradicate homelessness among unaccompanied youth. The information in this brief comes from grant applications, semi-annual progress reports submitted by YARH grantees, and two-day site visits with each grantee in January – March 2015. (Edited author summary)

     

     

    This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood. It presents a data strategy, a capacity strategy, and an intervention model designed to prevent and eradicate homelessness among unaccompanied youth. The information in this brief comes from grant applications, semi-annual progress reports submitted by YARH grantees, and two-day site visits with each grantee in January – March 2015. (Edited author summary)

     

     

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