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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Edin, Kathryn; Kefalas, Maria
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2011

    Millie Acevedo bore her first child before the age of 16 and dropped out of high school to care for her newborn. Now 27, she is the unmarried mother of three and is raising her kids in one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods. Would she and her children be better off if she had waited to have them and had married their father first? Why do so many poor American youth like Millie continue to have children before they can afford to take care of them?

    Over a span of five years, sociologists Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas talked in-depth with 162 low-income single moms like Millie to learn how they think about marriage and family. Promises I Can Keep offers an intimate look at what marriage and motherhood mean to these women and provides the most extensive on-the-ground study to date of why they put children before marriage despite the daunting challenges they know lie ahead. (author abstract)

    Millie Acevedo bore her first child before the age of 16 and dropped out of high school to care for her newborn. Now 27, she is the unmarried mother of three and is raising her kids in one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods. Would she and her children be better off if she had waited to have them and had married their father first? Why do so many poor American youth like Millie continue to have children before they can afford to take care of them?

    Over a span of five years, sociologists Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas talked in-depth with 162 low-income single moms like Millie to learn how they think about marriage and family. Promises I Can Keep offers an intimate look at what marriage and motherhood mean to these women and provides the most extensive on-the-ground study to date of why they put children before marriage despite the daunting challenges they know lie ahead. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Shirk, Martha; Bennett, Neil G.; Aber, J. Lawrence
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1999

    In Lives on the Line, Martha Shirk, Neil G. Bennett, and NCCP Director J. Lawrence Aber meld affecting personal profiles with sophisticated demographic analysis to create a vivid portrait of what life is like for more than 14 million American children growing up below the poverty line. In personal profiles of ten families across the nation, from a Pacific Islander family in Hawaii to a homeless family in a wealthy New York City suburb, award-winning journalist Martha Shirk depicts the realities of life for children below the poverty line. She takes readers deep into the lives of families in poverty—lives sometimes marked by childhood abuse, parental loss, and long-term violence—and with each family explores their prospects for moving above the poverty threshold. Along the way, Shirk finds amazing resilience, resourcefulness, and strength of spirit in many of these poor families.

    Neil G. Bennett, Director of Demography for the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University (NCCP), shatters many commonly held stereotypes by analyzing Census Bureau...

    In Lives on the Line, Martha Shirk, Neil G. Bennett, and NCCP Director J. Lawrence Aber meld affecting personal profiles with sophisticated demographic analysis to create a vivid portrait of what life is like for more than 14 million American children growing up below the poverty line. In personal profiles of ten families across the nation, from a Pacific Islander family in Hawaii to a homeless family in a wealthy New York City suburb, award-winning journalist Martha Shirk depicts the realities of life for children below the poverty line. She takes readers deep into the lives of families in poverty—lives sometimes marked by childhood abuse, parental loss, and long-term violence—and with each family explores their prospects for moving above the poverty threshold. Along the way, Shirk finds amazing resilience, resourcefulness, and strength of spirit in many of these poor families.

    Neil G. Bennett, Director of Demography for the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University (NCCP), shatters many commonly held stereotypes by analyzing Census Bureau data to show which American children are most likely to be poor. He reports, for instance, that over 60 percent of poor young children have at least one employed parent, that most poor young children live in suburban or rural areas, and that a parent's graduation from high school is insufficient to insure against poverty. Among his most startling findings are that in the last two decades, the Young Child Poverty Rate grew significantly faster in the suburbs than in urban or rural areas, and that it grew much faster among whites than among blacks.

    J. Lawrence Aber, a nationally recognized expert in child development and social policy, describes the effects of poverty on child development and showcases proven strategies for preventing or reducing child poverty. He also shows us that it is in our national self-interest to address the problem of child poverty by making a smart investment in America's future.

    As a powerful portrait of the effects of poverty on America's children and families, Lives on the Line narrows the gap between “them” and “us.” It will change the way you think about the poor. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Eberts, Randall W.; O'Leary, Christopher J.; Wandmer, Stephen A.
    Year: 2002

    This book offers a thorough overview of the U.S. experience with targeting reemployment services and self-employment assistance to UI beneficiaries most likely to exhaust benefits. The authors also suggest other programs that might benefit from targeting, examine Canadian efforts at targeting reemployment services, and consider prospects for a new Frontline Decision Support System for one-stop centers. (author abstract)

    Contents:

    1. Targeting Employment Services under the Workforce Investment Act / Stephen A. Wandner
    2. Predicting the Exhaustion of Unemployment Compensation / Robert B. Olsen, Marisa Kelso, Paul T. Decker, and Daniel H. Klepinger ; comments by Mark C. Berger
    3. Evaluation of WPRS Systems / Katherine P. Dickinson, Paul T. Decker, and Suzanne D. Kreutzer ; comments by John Heinberg, Walter Nicholson
    4. A Panel Discussion on the WPRS System / Pete Fleming, Al Jaloviar, Helen Parker, and Marc Perrett ; comments by David E. Balducchi
    5. Profiling in Self-Employment Assistance Programs / Jon C. Messenger, Carolyn...

    This book offers a thorough overview of the U.S. experience with targeting reemployment services and self-employment assistance to UI beneficiaries most likely to exhaust benefits. The authors also suggest other programs that might benefit from targeting, examine Canadian efforts at targeting reemployment services, and consider prospects for a new Frontline Decision Support System for one-stop centers. (author abstract)

    Contents:

    1. Targeting Employment Services under the Workforce Investment Act / Stephen A. Wandner
    2. Predicting the Exhaustion of Unemployment Compensation / Robert B. Olsen, Marisa Kelso, Paul T. Decker, and Daniel H. Klepinger ; comments by Mark C. Berger
    3. Evaluation of WPRS Systems / Katherine P. Dickinson, Paul T. Decker, and Suzanne D. Kreutzer ; comments by John Heinberg, Walter Nicholson
    4. A Panel Discussion on the WPRS System / Pete Fleming, Al Jaloviar, Helen Parker, and Marc Perrett ; comments by David E. Balducchi
    5. Profiling in Self-Employment Assistance Programs / Jon C. Messenger, Carolyn Peterson-Vaccaro, and Wayne Vroman ; comments by Jacob M. Benus, Wayne Gordon
    6. Targeting Reemployment Bonuses / Christopher J. O'Leary, Paul T. Decker, and Stephen A. Wandner ; comments by Jennifer Warlick
    7. Measures of Program Performance and the Training Choices of Displaced Workers / Louis Jacobson, Robert LaLonde, and Daniel Sullivan ; comments by Kevin Hollenbeck
    8. Using Statistical Assessment Tools to Target Services to Work First Participants / Randall W. Eberts
    9. Targeting Job Retention Services for Welfare Recipients / Anu Rangarajan, Peter Schochet, and Dexter Chu ; comments by Timothy J. Bartik, Don Oellerich
    10. Targeting Reemployment Services in Canada / Terry Colpitts ; comments by Jeffrey Smith
    11. Predicting Long-Term Unemployment in Canada: Prospects and Policy Implications / Ging Wong, Harold Henson, and Arun Roy ; comments by Jeffrey Smith
    12. A Frontline Decision Support System for One-Stop Centers / Randall W. Eberts, Christopher J. O'Leary, and Kelly J. DeRango ; comments by Helen Parker
    13. A Panel Discussion on the Experience and Future Plans of States / Rich Hobbie, Jim Finch, Chuck Middlebrooks, and Jack Weidenbach
  • Individual Author: Koohi-Kamali, Feridoon; Liu, Ran
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2017

    The combined influence of gender and race has been a defining feature of poverty in the USA, especially for single mothers. Recent applications of capability-based multidimensional poverty (MP) measurement to US data have examined race and gender, but little attention has been given to the intersection of the two. We address this gap in the literature on multidimensional poverty by employing household-level US Census data for the years 2006–2010 that are from Pennsylvania, a state with key income poverty indicators close to the mid-poverty values for all fifty states. We employ a dual cut-off procedure to present MP measures by levels of population sub-groups. The poverty ranking by single motherhood shows Hispanics are the most deprived, Whites as the least deprived, and African–Americans coming in between. Our findings suggest that the provision of child care facilities can prove effective for poverty reduction; and the improvement of language skills is likely to be critical for Hispanics. (Author abstract)

    The combined influence of gender and race has been a defining feature of poverty in the USA, especially for single mothers. Recent applications of capability-based multidimensional poverty (MP) measurement to US data have examined race and gender, but little attention has been given to the intersection of the two. We address this gap in the literature on multidimensional poverty by employing household-level US Census data for the years 2006–2010 that are from Pennsylvania, a state with key income poverty indicators close to the mid-poverty values for all fifty states. We employ a dual cut-off procedure to present MP measures by levels of population sub-groups. The poverty ranking by single motherhood shows Hispanics are the most deprived, Whites as the least deprived, and African–Americans coming in between. Our findings suggest that the provision of child care facilities can prove effective for poverty reduction; and the improvement of language skills is likely to be critical for Hispanics. (Author abstract)

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