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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Brown, Kay E.
    Year: 2012

    The federal-state TANF partnership makes significant resources available to address poverty in the lives of families with children. With these resources, TANF has provided a basic safety net to many families and helped many parents step into jobs. At the same time, there are questions about the strength and breadth of the TANF safety net. Many eligible families—some of whom have very low incomes—are not receiving TANF cash assistance. Regarding TANF as a welfare-to-work program, the emphasis on work participation rates as a measure of state program performance has helped change the culture of state welfare programs to focus on moving families into employment. However, features of the work participation rates as currently implemented undercut their effectiveness as a way to encourage states to engage parents, including those difficult to serve, and help them achieve self-sufficiency. Finally, states have used TANF funds to support a variety of programs other than cash assistance as allowed by law. Yet, we do not know enough about this spending or whether this flexibility is...

    The federal-state TANF partnership makes significant resources available to address poverty in the lives of families with children. With these resources, TANF has provided a basic safety net to many families and helped many parents step into jobs. At the same time, there are questions about the strength and breadth of the TANF safety net. Many eligible families—some of whom have very low incomes—are not receiving TANF cash assistance. Regarding TANF as a welfare-to-work program, the emphasis on work participation rates as a measure of state program performance has helped change the culture of state welfare programs to focus on moving families into employment. However, features of the work participation rates as currently implemented undercut their effectiveness as a way to encourage states to engage parents, including those difficult to serve, and help them achieve self-sufficiency. Finally, states have used TANF funds to support a variety of programs other than cash assistance as allowed by law. Yet, we do not know enough about this spending or whether this flexibility is resulting in the most efficient and effective use of funds at this time. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce
    Year: 2002

    This Congressional report contains the testimony presented at a hearing to examine the extent to which Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) work services are being provided through the one-stop career centers established through the Workforce Investment Act and to determine how such linkages are impacting program participants. The oral statements of the following individuals are presented: Howard "Buck" McKeon and Patsy T. Mink, Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness, Committee on Education and the Workforce, U.S. House of Representatives; Sigurd R. Nilsen, director, education, workforce, and income security issues, U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO); Greg Gardner, interim executive director, Utah Department of Workforce Services; John B. O'Reilly, Jr., executive director, Southeastern Michigan Community Alliance; Erika Kates, senior research associate, Heller Graduate School, Brandeis University, and executive director, Welfare, Education, Training, Access Coalition, Boston, Massachusetts; and Barbara Gault, director of research, Institute for Women's Policy...

    This Congressional report contains the testimony presented at a hearing to examine the extent to which Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) work services are being provided through the one-stop career centers established through the Workforce Investment Act and to determine how such linkages are impacting program participants. The oral statements of the following individuals are presented: Howard "Buck" McKeon and Patsy T. Mink, Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness, Committee on Education and the Workforce, U.S. House of Representatives; Sigurd R. Nilsen, director, education, workforce, and income security issues, U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO); Greg Gardner, interim executive director, Utah Department of Workforce Services; John B. O'Reilly, Jr., executive director, Southeastern Michigan Community Alliance; Erika Kates, senior research associate, Heller Graduate School, Brandeis University, and executive director, Welfare, Education, Training, Access Coalition, Boston, Massachusetts; and Barbara Gault, director of research, Institute for Women's Policy Research. The report's eight appendixes contain the written statements submitted by the witnesses plus the text of the GAO report "Workforce Investment Act: Coordination between TANF Programs and One-Stop Centers Is Increasing, But Challenges Remain" and the written statement submitted by the Utah Department of Workforce Services in response to questions regarding Utah's extension policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Government Accountability Office
    Year: 2013

    The economy is recovering from the recession, but employers still have difficulty filling certain jobs. DOL's Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Adult and Dislocated Worker programs are designed in part to help employers find the skilled workers they need. The programs provide participants with services including job training, which must be for occupations that are in demand. However, questions have been raised about the extent to which these programs are positioned to help supply workers for jobs that employers have difficulty filling. The conference report accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012 mandated that GAO assess the Adult and Dislocated Worker programs. This report addresses (1) how local workforce areas have identified occupations that are in demand and how they have guided participants toward training for them; and (2) what challenges local workforce areas have faced in helping employers fill certain jobs. GAO conducted a web-based survey of a nationally representative sample of 200 local workforce investment boards (WIB), which oversee local workforce...

    The economy is recovering from the recession, but employers still have difficulty filling certain jobs. DOL's Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Adult and Dislocated Worker programs are designed in part to help employers find the skilled workers they need. The programs provide participants with services including job training, which must be for occupations that are in demand. However, questions have been raised about the extent to which these programs are positioned to help supply workers for jobs that employers have difficulty filling. The conference report accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012 mandated that GAO assess the Adult and Dislocated Worker programs. This report addresses (1) how local workforce areas have identified occupations that are in demand and how they have guided participants toward training for them; and (2) what challenges local workforce areas have faced in helping employers fill certain jobs. GAO conducted a web-based survey of a nationally representative sample of 200 local workforce investment boards (WIB), which oversee local workforce areas, and used the results to create estimates about the population of all WIBs nationwide. GAO also interviewed DOL officials and workforce organizations. (author abstract)