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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Kassabian, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Rhode Island's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During this year, the state engaged frontline workers, state leaders and community stakeholders, built close connections with the state’s health reform activities around design of a new eligibility system, identified opportunities for data system improvements and to align eligibility and enrollment requirements and implemented relevant policy changes. (author abstract)

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Rhode Island's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During this year, the state engaged frontline workers, state leaders and community stakeholders, built close connections with the state’s health reform activities around design of a new eligibility system, identified opportunities for data system improvements and to align eligibility and enrollment requirements and implemented relevant policy changes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gordon, Anne; Crepinsek, Mary Kay; Nogales, Renee; Condon, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of USDA has sponsored the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment study (SNDA-III) to provide up-to-date information on the school meal programs, the school environments that affect the food programs, the nutrient content of school meals, and the contributions of school meals to children’s diets. The study builds on the methods used in two previous SNDA studies sponsored by FNS and, thus, allows some examination of trends over time. Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) was awarded contracts by FNS to collect and analyze the study data and produce reports.

    This report, the first of three volumes, focuses on the analysis of school meal program characteristics at the school level, as well as at the level of the School Food Authority (SFA) (usually a school district or a small group of districts that sponsors the school meal programs). A second volume focuses on characteristics of students who participate in school meals, student and parent satisfaction with the meals, and descriptions of the dietary intakes of schoolchildren. A third...

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of USDA has sponsored the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment study (SNDA-III) to provide up-to-date information on the school meal programs, the school environments that affect the food programs, the nutrient content of school meals, and the contributions of school meals to children’s diets. The study builds on the methods used in two previous SNDA studies sponsored by FNS and, thus, allows some examination of trends over time. Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) was awarded contracts by FNS to collect and analyze the study data and produce reports.

    This report, the first of three volumes, focuses on the analysis of school meal program characteristics at the school level, as well as at the level of the School Food Authority (SFA) (usually a school district or a small group of districts that sponsors the school meal programs). A second volume focuses on characteristics of students who participate in school meals, student and parent satisfaction with the meals, and descriptions of the dietary intakes of schoolchildren. A third volume provides in-depth information on the sample design and data collection procedures used in the study. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Levin, Madeleine; Neuberger, Zoe
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    “Community eligibility” is a powerful new tool to ensure that low-income children in high-poverty neighborhoods have access to healthy meals at school.  Established in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the option allows schools in high-poverty areas to offer nutritious meals through the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to all students at no charge.  More than 2,200 high-poverty schools serving nearly 1 million children in seven states — one in ten children across these states — operated under community eligibility during the 2012-2013 school year. Community eligibility is making a profound difference for students and schools. Findings from Illinois, Kentucky, and Michigan, where school districts first implemented the option in the 2011-2012 school year, show ongoing growth in the number of schools choosing community eligibility and a striking increase in the number of students eating school breakfast and lunch. This report analyzes the scope and impact of community eligibility in the seven states that implemented it in the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013...

    “Community eligibility” is a powerful new tool to ensure that low-income children in high-poverty neighborhoods have access to healthy meals at school.  Established in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, the option allows schools in high-poverty areas to offer nutritious meals through the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to all students at no charge.  More than 2,200 high-poverty schools serving nearly 1 million children in seven states — one in ten children across these states — operated under community eligibility during the 2012-2013 school year. Community eligibility is making a profound difference for students and schools. Findings from Illinois, Kentucky, and Michigan, where school districts first implemented the option in the 2011-2012 school year, show ongoing growth in the number of schools choosing community eligibility and a striking increase in the number of students eating school breakfast and lunch. This report analyzes the scope and impact of community eligibility in the seven states that implemented it in the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 school years. (Four more states are starting in the 2013-2014 school year.) It is meant to serve as a guide for states and school districts as the nationwide rollout of community eligibility approaches. It explains and provides resources related to how community eligibility works, how it helps participating schools and families, how to operate without school meal applications, and how stakeholders can prepare to implement the option when it becomes available in all states for the 2014-2015 school year. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bell, Loren; Tao, Fumiyo; Anthony, Jodi; Logan, Chris; Ledsky, Rebecca; Ferreira, Marisa; Brown, Amy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    In the Food Stamp Program, States have the option to provide nutrition education to food stamp recipients and eligible non-participants as part of their administrative operations. The scope of food stamp nutrition education (FSNE) has expanded rapidly since its inception – with the Federal share of costs growing from less than $1 million in 1992 to $228 million in 2004.

    The goal of FSNE is to provide educational programs that increase, within a limited budget, the likelihood that food stamp recipients make healthy food choices and choose active lifestyles consistent with the most recent advice reflected in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPyramid. Within this general guidance, however, States have the flexibility to design a wide variety of nutrition education initiatives and operate through contracted implementing agencies, local projects and various partner organizations.

    This report presents a comprehensive and systematic national description of food stamp nutrition education operations in fiscal year (FY) 2004. It also provides a comparison of those...

    In the Food Stamp Program, States have the option to provide nutrition education to food stamp recipients and eligible non-participants as part of their administrative operations. The scope of food stamp nutrition education (FSNE) has expanded rapidly since its inception – with the Federal share of costs growing from less than $1 million in 1992 to $228 million in 2004.

    The goal of FSNE is to provide educational programs that increase, within a limited budget, the likelihood that food stamp recipients make healthy food choices and choose active lifestyles consistent with the most recent advice reflected in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPyramid. Within this general guidance, however, States have the flexibility to design a wide variety of nutrition education initiatives and operate through contracted implementing agencies, local projects and various partner organizations.

    This report presents a comprehensive and systematic national description of food stamp nutrition education operations in fiscal year (FY) 2004. It also provides a comparison of those operations to the standards of excellence for nutrition education developed as the Food Stamp Nutrition Education Guiding Principles, released by FNS in September 2005. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Giesen, Lindsay; Isaacs, Julia
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    The presentation describes Work Support Strategies, an effort piloted by six states to increase families' enrollment in the full package work supports and aid states in more efficiently and effectively delivering benefits (e.g., Medicaid/CHIP, SNAP, child care subsidies).  Lessons learned from the first year of implementation are presented along with strategies states developed to address challenges.

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation describes Work Support Strategies, an effort piloted by six states to increase families' enrollment in the full package work supports and aid states in more efficiently and effectively delivering benefits (e.g., Medicaid/CHIP, SNAP, child care subsidies).  Lessons learned from the first year of implementation are presented along with strategies states developed to address challenges.

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

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