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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Stack, Carol
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1975

    All Our Kin is the chronicle of a young white woman's sojourn into The Flats, an African-American ghetto community, to study the support system family and friends form when coping with poverty. Eschewing the traditional method of entry into the community used by anthropologists -- through authority figures and community leaders -- she approached the families herself by way of an acquaintance from school, becoming one of the first sociologists to explore the black kinship network from the inside. The result was a landmark study that debunked the misconception that poor families were unstable and disorganized. On the contrary, her study showed that families in The Flats adapted to their poverty conditions by forming large, resilient, lifelong support networks based on friendship and family that were very powerful, highly structured and surprisingly complex.

    Universally considered the best analysis of family and kinship in a ghetto black community ever published, All Our Kin is also an indictment of a social system that reinforces welfare dependency and...

    All Our Kin is the chronicle of a young white woman's sojourn into The Flats, an African-American ghetto community, to study the support system family and friends form when coping with poverty. Eschewing the traditional method of entry into the community used by anthropologists -- through authority figures and community leaders -- she approached the families herself by way of an acquaintance from school, becoming one of the first sociologists to explore the black kinship network from the inside. The result was a landmark study that debunked the misconception that poor families were unstable and disorganized. On the contrary, her study showed that families in The Flats adapted to their poverty conditions by forming large, resilient, lifelong support networks based on friendship and family that were very powerful, highly structured and surprisingly complex.

    Universally considered the best analysis of family and kinship in a ghetto black community ever published, All Our Kin is also an indictment of a social system that reinforces welfare dependency and chronic unemployment. As today's political debate over welfare reform heats up, its message has become more important than ever. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Baek, Deokrye
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This paper examines whether access to public transportation reduces the probability of food insecurity for households. The dataset combines information from the Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement (CPS-FSS) and the National Transit Database for the period of 2006 to 2009. I address a potential endogeneity problem using the change in federal governmental transportation funding, the Urbanized Area Formula grants, as an instrument. I find evidence of a negative causal effect of public transportation accessibility on food insecurity. An extra bus-equivalent vehicle per 10,000 people decreases the probability of food insecurity of households by 0.78 percentage points. In particular, the impact of public transit is more prominent among poor households and poor African - American households. (author abstract)

    This paper examines whether access to public transportation reduces the probability of food insecurity for households. The dataset combines information from the Current Population Survey Food Security Supplement (CPS-FSS) and the National Transit Database for the period of 2006 to 2009. I address a potential endogeneity problem using the change in federal governmental transportation funding, the Urbanized Area Formula grants, as an instrument. I find evidence of a negative causal effect of public transportation accessibility on food insecurity. An extra bus-equivalent vehicle per 10,000 people decreases the probability of food insecurity of households by 0.78 percentage points. In particular, the impact of public transit is more prominent among poor households and poor African - American households. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mohr, Jennifer; Zygmunt, Eva; Clark, Patricia
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    A case study approach was employed to investigate low-income families’ aspirations for their children and their understandings of their children’s developmental needs. Participants were four women whose children or grandchildren were enrolled in an urban early childhood program and were considered “at risk.” Qualitative methods including interviews, observations, and analysis of artifacts were used. Results indicated that the participants’ aspirations for their children included going to college, as has been shown in other studies to be characteristic of middle-class families. Results also suggested that the participants were insightful about child development, young children’s learning, and the needs of young children. Analysis indicated that participants understood the importance of a shared role between families and teachers in their children’s development, and they wanted to work with their children’s teachers in that manner. The participants expected early childhood programs to not only prepare young children for school but to prepare them to negotiate successfully social...

    A case study approach was employed to investigate low-income families’ aspirations for their children and their understandings of their children’s developmental needs. Participants were four women whose children or grandchildren were enrolled in an urban early childhood program and were considered “at risk.” Qualitative methods including interviews, observations, and analysis of artifacts were used. Results indicated that the participants’ aspirations for their children included going to college, as has been shown in other studies to be characteristic of middle-class families. Results also suggested that the participants were insightful about child development, young children’s learning, and the needs of young children. Analysis indicated that participants understood the importance of a shared role between families and teachers in their children’s development, and they wanted to work with their children’s teachers in that manner. The participants expected early childhood programs to not only prepare young children for school but to prepare them to negotiate successfully social interactions with both children and adults. Implications for teachers, administrators, and teacher education programs are discussed. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Finkel, Meryl; Lam, Ken
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    The 1998 Quality Housing Work Responsibility Act (QHWRA) requires public housing agencies (PHAs) to offer the option of a flat rent (as opposed to an income-based rent) to residents of public housing. Flat rents are based on market rents and, therefore, the tenant rent does not vary with income. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) expected that by having the option of paying a flat rent, public housing residents would not be discouraged from working and increasing their income because their rent would not increase if their income increased. Similarly, QHWRA’s flat-rent option was also expected to avoid creating disincentives for continued residency by families that are attempting to become economically self-sufficient.

    HUD implemented the provision on flat rents in 1999. As of the end of 2005, about 105,000 families (of the more than 1.2 million public housing households) were identified on HUD’s data system as paying either flat rents or ceiling rents.

    This article uses extracts from HUD’s Office of Public and Indian Housing Information...

    The 1998 Quality Housing Work Responsibility Act (QHWRA) requires public housing agencies (PHAs) to offer the option of a flat rent (as opposed to an income-based rent) to residents of public housing. Flat rents are based on market rents and, therefore, the tenant rent does not vary with income. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) expected that by having the option of paying a flat rent, public housing residents would not be discouraged from working and increasing their income because their rent would not increase if their income increased. Similarly, QHWRA’s flat-rent option was also expected to avoid creating disincentives for continued residency by families that are attempting to become economically self-sufficient.

    HUD implemented the provision on flat rents in 1999. As of the end of 2005, about 105,000 families (of the more than 1.2 million public housing households) were identified on HUD’s data system as paying either flat rents or ceiling rents.

    This article uses extracts from HUD’s Office of Public and Indian Housing Information Center data system to provide some basic information on the use of flat rents in public housing, including the types of PHAs, places, and families that have selected a flat rent, and changes that have taken place in these properties and for these families coincident with the use of flat rents.

    The article shows that, although nearly all PHAs have at least some flat-rent units, the proportion of flat-rent units in each PHA is generally small. Households paying flat rents have much higher incomes compared with other public housing residents. Similarly, a much higher percentage of households paying flat rents reported that most of their income was from wages compared with other public housing households. Thus, flat rents appear to be succeeding in allowing residents in these units to increase their income through employment and to remain in their units even as their income increases. Rents in units where residents are paying flat rents are substantially higher than in other public housing units. At the same time, households paying flat rents are virtually always paying less than 30 percent of their income for rent. In other words, flat rents offer benefits to both the residents and the housing agencies. Residents pay less than they would under an income-based rent scenario and the PHAs receive a higher rent than they would from regular public housing tenants. Properties with flat-rent units have a higher degree of income mixing than other properties do. This finding is as expected because households in units with flat rents have higher incomes than most other public housing households do. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pendall, Rolf; Theodos, Brett; Franks, Kaitlin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This brief explores vulnerability, precariousness, and resilience as they apply to people, housing, neighborhoods, and metropolitan areas. We document the relationships between potential personal or household vulnerability and potentially precarious housing conditions. Microdata from the American Community Survey suggest that an important minority of people have multiple vulnerabilities; these vulnerabilities associate with residence in precarious housing. By beginning from the level of individuals, we build the groundwork for a more robust approach toward tackling concentrated disadvantage within the context of fostering resilient regions. We suggest that policy be directed toward precarious situations most likely to afflict the most vulnerable populations. (author abstract)

    This brief explores vulnerability, precariousness, and resilience as they apply to people, housing, neighborhoods, and metropolitan areas. We document the relationships between potential personal or household vulnerability and potentially precarious housing conditions. Microdata from the American Community Survey suggest that an important minority of people have multiple vulnerabilities; these vulnerabilities associate with residence in precarious housing. By beginning from the level of individuals, we build the groundwork for a more robust approach toward tackling concentrated disadvantage within the context of fostering resilient regions. We suggest that policy be directed toward precarious situations most likely to afflict the most vulnerable populations. (author abstract)

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