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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Gordon, Anne; Oddo, Vanessa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    American Indians living on reservations or in other tribal areas (Indian Country) are among the most disadvantaged populations in the United States. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), section 141, requires the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to report to Congress on the ways that Federal nutrition programs can help overcome child hunger and nutrition problems on Indian reservations. To meet this requirement, this report addresses three questions:

    1. What is the level of food insecurity, obesity, and Type II diabetes1 among American Indian children living in Indian Country?
    2. What is the scope and reach of Federal nutrition programs in Indian Country?
    3. How can the HHFKA improve food security and reduce obesity and diabetes risk among American Indian children living in Indian Country?

    Before addressing these issues, we briefly describe the population of American Indians (AIs) as a whole and those living in Indian Country. We define AIs, in general, as those who report American Indian as their race in the U.S. Census or other national...

    American Indians living on reservations or in other tribal areas (Indian Country) are among the most disadvantaged populations in the United States. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), section 141, requires the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to report to Congress on the ways that Federal nutrition programs can help overcome child hunger and nutrition problems on Indian reservations. To meet this requirement, this report addresses three questions:

    1. What is the level of food insecurity, obesity, and Type II diabetes1 among American Indian children living in Indian Country?
    2. What is the scope and reach of Federal nutrition programs in Indian Country?
    3. How can the HHFKA improve food security and reduce obesity and diabetes risk among American Indian children living in Indian Country?

    Before addressing these issues, we briefly describe the population of American Indians (AIs) as a whole and those living in Indian Country. We define AIs, in general, as those who report American Indian as their race in the U.S. Census or other national surveys and are not Alaska Natives (ANs). In some instances, however, we report data on AIs and ANs together, as that is all that is available, and ANs are less than 10 percent of the combined group. Whenever not stated otherwise, we use those reporting AI or AN as their only race. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Turner, Sherri L.; Trotter, Michelle J.; Lapan, Richard T.; Czajka, Katherine A.; Yang, Pahoua; Brissett, Annette E. A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    This study tested hypotheses of the Integrative Contextual Model of Career Development (R. T. Lapan, 2004a) by investigating the multivariate effects of 6 interrelated career development skills (career exploration, person- environment fit, goal setting, social/prosocial/work readiness, self-regulated learning, and the utilization of social support) on 6 intermediate vocational outcomes (academic achievement, self-efficacy expectations, positive self-attributions, vocational interests, vocational identity, and proactivity) among Native American adolescents. Results showed that individual and shared variance among the skills positively predicted 79% of variance in 5 of the 6 outcomes. Results suggest that each of the skills contributes substantially and in combination to Native American adolescents' career development. (author abstract)

    This study tested hypotheses of the Integrative Contextual Model of Career Development (R. T. Lapan, 2004a) by investigating the multivariate effects of 6 interrelated career development skills (career exploration, person- environment fit, goal setting, social/prosocial/work readiness, self-regulated learning, and the utilization of social support) on 6 intermediate vocational outcomes (academic achievement, self-efficacy expectations, positive self-attributions, vocational interests, vocational identity, and proactivity) among Native American adolescents. Results showed that individual and shared variance among the skills positively predicted 79% of variance in 5 of the 6 outcomes. Results suggest that each of the skills contributes substantially and in combination to Native American adolescents' career development. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Berman, Jacqueline; Coffee-Borden, Brandon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is...

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is based on INA grantees’ performance measure data and qualitative data collected during site visits to a purposive sample of five diverse grantees in five states.  This report also highlights key findings and innovations grantees made to better serve youth. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bush, Janet
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2009

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between fertility and household economy on Montana’s Northern Plains. Low fertility and outmigration in European American communities have led to dramatic depopulation of the region. At the same time, isolated Indian reservations in the area have grown in population due to high fertility and return migration.

    A mixed methods research approach was used to explore the relationship between fertility and social acceptance of communal household economic strategies. Census data and birth records described differences in fertility and household economy between European American and Native American populations in six Plains Indian reservation counties; inferential tests demonstrated patterns of variation among fertility and economic variables in 37 rural counties. Qualitative ethnographic data were collected in two representative communities, one predominately European American and one predominately Native American, documenting individual beliefs and actions that reflected and reinforced community themes of ideal fertility...

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between fertility and household economy on Montana’s Northern Plains. Low fertility and outmigration in European American communities have led to dramatic depopulation of the region. At the same time, isolated Indian reservations in the area have grown in population due to high fertility and return migration.

    A mixed methods research approach was used to explore the relationship between fertility and social acceptance of communal household economic strategies. Census data and birth records described differences in fertility and household economy between European American and Native American populations in six Plains Indian reservation counties; inferential tests demonstrated patterns of variation among fertility and economic variables in 37 rural counties. Qualitative ethnographic data were collected in two representative communities, one predominately European American and one predominately Native American, documenting individual beliefs and actions that reflected and reinforced community themes of ideal fertility.

    Findings delineated value constellations that supported culturally specific fertility ideals. European American informants idealized delayed parenthood, childrearing within a nuclear family setting, household self-sufficiency, and avoidance of public assistance. In contrast, Native American informants idealized early parenthood, childrearing within an extended family setting, mutually dependent extended family households, and acceptance of tribal assistance without stigmatization.

    Analyses of state and tribal TANF programs and teen pregnancy prevention initiatives illustrate culturally specific approaches to public policy that influence fertility behaviors. State and federal programs reinforce dominant culture ideals of delayed parenthood and nuclear family self-sufficiency; they pathologize Native American patterns of family formation by removing parenthood from the context of community. Some tribes have assumed administration of TANF and adapted the program in order to preserve traditional childrearing practices and maintain family-building systems. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cole, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This report describes Native American participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) based on data collected by the biennial WIC Participant and Program Characteristics Studies in 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998. The report presents information on the geographic distribution, demographic characteristics, health status, and public health concerns of low-income Native American women, infants, and children participating in the WIC Program on and off reservations; describes Native American Tribes and the role of tribal governments in administering WIC programs; compares the characteristics of Native American WIC enrollees with all WIC enrollees; and examines the health status of Native American WIC enrollees. (author abstract)

    This report describes Native American participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) based on data collected by the biennial WIC Participant and Program Characteristics Studies in 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998. The report presents information on the geographic distribution, demographic characteristics, health status, and public health concerns of low-income Native American women, infants, and children participating in the WIC Program on and off reservations; describes Native American Tribes and the role of tribal governments in administering WIC programs; compares the characteristics of Native American WIC enrollees with all WIC enrollees; and examines the health status of Native American WIC enrollees. (author abstract)

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