Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sweeten, Gary; Apel, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    Existing research establishes a lengthy list of adverse outcomes of incarceration that includes an elevated risk of criminal offending as well as unfavorable outcomes in the labor market, the institution of education, and the marriage market. These findings are consistent enough that it is tempting to attribute them to the causal effect of incarceration, particularly to the social stigma that attaches to individuals with a prison record. In light of the recent visibility of this research and the importance of public policies that flow logically from it, we revisit the impact of juvenile (ages 16-17) and young adult (18-19) incarceration on short- and medium-term outcomes in a variety of domains. This paper is directly concerned with the problem of causal identification. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to estimate difference-indifferences models as well as propensity score matching. The empirical results suggest that there is evidence of causal effects for some types of outcomes. For example, while we find that incarceration reduces the probability...

    Existing research establishes a lengthy list of adverse outcomes of incarceration that includes an elevated risk of criminal offending as well as unfavorable outcomes in the labor market, the institution of education, and the marriage market. These findings are consistent enough that it is tempting to attribute them to the causal effect of incarceration, particularly to the social stigma that attaches to individuals with a prison record. In light of the recent visibility of this research and the importance of public policies that flow logically from it, we revisit the impact of juvenile (ages 16-17) and young adult (18-19) incarceration on short- and medium-term outcomes in a variety of domains. This paper is directly concerned with the problem of causal identification. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to estimate difference-indifferences models as well as propensity score matching. The empirical results suggest that there is evidence of causal effects for some types of outcomes. For example, while we find that incarceration reduces the probability of formal employment, we find no adverse effect on wages among those who are employed. We find that the most consistent negative outcomes attributable to the experience of incarceration are related to educational attainment. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rural Policy Research Institute
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    State caseloads have decreased across the nation, with declines in both rural and urban areas of the country. Welfare reform and a strong national economy are both important factors producing these changes.

    There is no clear evidence about what is happening to former recipients after they leave the rolls. Recent reports provide a mixed review. Studies indicate that more recipients are finding employment, and that the overall child poverty rate is declining. Many studies also indicate that work is not available for everyone leaving the welfare rolls, and in cases where individuals do find work, it has not necessarily lifted families out of poverty. Furthermore, these outcomes seem to differ across regions and across rural and urban areas.

    This report takes a deeper look at early evidence of rural outcomes over the two years since the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunities Reconciliation Act was implemented. Analysis of the March 1998 Current Population Survey, county caseload data, and other sources reveals important differences in rural and urban outcomes...

    State caseloads have decreased across the nation, with declines in both rural and urban areas of the country. Welfare reform and a strong national economy are both important factors producing these changes.

    There is no clear evidence about what is happening to former recipients after they leave the rolls. Recent reports provide a mixed review. Studies indicate that more recipients are finding employment, and that the overall child poverty rate is declining. Many studies also indicate that work is not available for everyone leaving the welfare rolls, and in cases where individuals do find work, it has not necessarily lifted families out of poverty. Furthermore, these outcomes seem to differ across regions and across rural and urban areas.

    This report takes a deeper look at early evidence of rural outcomes over the two years since the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunities Reconciliation Act was implemented. Analysis of the March 1998 Current Population Survey, county caseload data, and other sources reveals important differences in rural and urban outcomes under welfare reform. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cohen, Phillip N.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2006

    In the late 1990s economic expansion and the new welfare policy led to a dramatic growth in employment, and pushed down rates of welfare receipt among single mothers. Because employment increases reached so far down the economic ladder and official poverty declined, moreover, a conventional wisdom emerged that American had turned a corner with respect to poverty and its attendant social ills. Andrew Natsios spoke for many when, in the summer of 1999, he wrote, “Americans are wealthier, more law-abiding, and more willing to work in a booming economy, which gives credence to the old adage that a rising tide lifts all boats.”

    However, largely unnoticed at the intersection of these trends, and beginning in the early 1990s, was a decline in employment for a smaller and less visible population: single mothers with disabilities. That divergence turns out to be at the center of the growing disparity in wellbeing between single mothers with disabilities and the general population of single mothers that is the core issue for this report. As we will see, this disparity has important...

    In the late 1990s economic expansion and the new welfare policy led to a dramatic growth in employment, and pushed down rates of welfare receipt among single mothers. Because employment increases reached so far down the economic ladder and official poverty declined, moreover, a conventional wisdom emerged that American had turned a corner with respect to poverty and its attendant social ills. Andrew Natsios spoke for many when, in the summer of 1999, he wrote, “Americans are wealthier, more law-abiding, and more willing to work in a booming economy, which gives credence to the old adage that a rising tide lifts all boats.”

    However, largely unnoticed at the intersection of these trends, and beginning in the early 1990s, was a decline in employment for a smaller and less visible population: single mothers with disabilities. That divergence turns out to be at the center of the growing disparity in wellbeing between single mothers with disabilities and the general population of single mothers that is the core issue for this report. As we will see, this disparity has important implications for the relationship between work, family and the state in the United States. 

    The report begins with a brief theoretical framework and review of existing research, and then presents an analysis of trends in survival strategies and wellbeing for single mothers with and without disabilities. I conclude with a discussion of some policy approaches and recommendations for policy change. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Urban, Julie A.; Olson, Pamela N.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    Recognizing that mothers continue to bear the primary responsibility for household production, comprehensive logit models are developed to predict employment for low-income mothers. The models include a wide array of possible employment impediments, including individual, family environment, and community variables. Lack of family resource management, a variable not previously investigated in employment prediction, is found to be a significant impediment to employment. Under welfare reform, low-income mothers must balance family and work demands under severe resource constraints. Family resource management appears to play a crucial role in this balancing process. In addition, the local unemployment rate is found to be a significant predictor of employment. (author abstract)

    Recognizing that mothers continue to bear the primary responsibility for household production, comprehensive logit models are developed to predict employment for low-income mothers. The models include a wide array of possible employment impediments, including individual, family environment, and community variables. Lack of family resource management, a variable not previously investigated in employment prediction, is found to be a significant impediment to employment. Under welfare reform, low-income mothers must balance family and work demands under severe resource constraints. Family resource management appears to play a crucial role in this balancing process. In addition, the local unemployment rate is found to be a significant predictor of employment. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Jorgenson, Dale W.; Ho, Mun S.; Samuels, Jon D.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2015

    Labor quality growth represents the upgrading of the labor force through higher educational attainment and greater experience. While much attention has been devoted to the aging of the labor force and the ongoing retirement of the baby boomers, the looming plateau in average educational attainment of U.S. workers has been overlooked. The educational attainment of people emerging from the educational system, while high, has been nearly constant for the past several decades. Rising average educational attainment is about to become part of U.S. economic history. (author abstract)

    Labor quality growth represents the upgrading of the labor force through higher educational attainment and greater experience. While much attention has been devoted to the aging of the labor force and the ongoing retirement of the baby boomers, the looming plateau in average educational attainment of U.S. workers has been overlooked. The educational attainment of people emerging from the educational system, while high, has been nearly constant for the past several decades. Rising average educational attainment is about to become part of U.S. economic history. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1999 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations