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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Peterson, Michael
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2002

    This literature review provides a comprehensive review of professional journals, web-based sites, and other related materials, (i.e. longitudinal studies, etc.), to determine what role Rehabilitation Services has played to date in the provision of services to welfare recipients who have disabilities and have been affected by The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996.

    A comprehensive exploration of a variety of literature has determined that many people within the roles of the welfare systems have disabilities which adversely affect their abilities to obtain or maintain work. Many of these individuals have document able physical and/or mental disabilities yet the welfare system lacks the expertise to effectively serve the population.

    Print and electronic literature will be examined and analyzed to determine the role Rehabilitation Services Administration has played in providing the required leadership, monies, and technical assistance necessary for helping this population gain self-sufficiency, retain welfare benefits, or obtain the...

    This literature review provides a comprehensive review of professional journals, web-based sites, and other related materials, (i.e. longitudinal studies, etc.), to determine what role Rehabilitation Services has played to date in the provision of services to welfare recipients who have disabilities and have been affected by The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996.

    A comprehensive exploration of a variety of literature has determined that many people within the roles of the welfare systems have disabilities which adversely affect their abilities to obtain or maintain work. Many of these individuals have document able physical and/or mental disabilities yet the welfare system lacks the expertise to effectively serve the population.

    Print and electronic literature will be examined and analyzed to determine the role Rehabilitation Services Administration has played in providing the required leadership, monies, and technical assistance necessary for helping this population gain self-sufficiency, retain welfare benefits, or obtain the necessary federal/state subsidy(ies) in order to sustain their quality of life.

    The literature evaluated provided evidence that Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) has initiated the appropriate leadership, monies, and technical assistance to meet the needs of the population. RSA has allocated funds for Research and Demonstration Projects to aide States in developing state-of-the-art programs that will in turn provide best practices on a national level for serving welfare recipients who have disabilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Stevenson, Andre’ P.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2007

    This article examines a sample of young, unmarried mothers from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and considers how different types of economic support received soon after their first child is born contributes to the later self-sufficiency of young, unmarried mothers. It expands conventional categories of income support—AFDC, food stamps, child support—to include shared housing and relatives' assistance. The model also contains various behaviors of young mothers after the birth of their first child. The findings suggest that certain economic supports assist these mothers and that life choices they make after their child's birth are important to self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

    This article examines a sample of young, unmarried mothers from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and considers how different types of economic support received soon after their first child is born contributes to the later self-sufficiency of young, unmarried mothers. It expands conventional categories of income support—AFDC, food stamps, child support—to include shared housing and relatives' assistance. The model also contains various behaviors of young mothers after the birth of their first child. The findings suggest that certain economic supports assist these mothers and that life choices they make after their child's birth are important to self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bittle-Patton, Sylvia
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2004

    For over a decade, the issues of welfare reform and unemployment have been high priorities at the national level. Surveys were administered to participants in three training agencies to examine individual pre-training attitudinal and behavioral variables, including self-efficacy, employment commitment, and unemployment negativity. The study then examined the relationship between these variables and post-training job-search behavior, employment status, and job-search intended effort of unemployed trainees. The behavioral plasticity hypothesis was also explored in conjunction with the variables of general and specific self-efficacy, employment commitment, and unemployment negativity. Hierarchical regression analyses of data from 121 participants revealed that pre-training specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity were both significant predictors of post-training job-search behavior and frequency. Thus, trainees with higher levels of pre-training specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity also reported more varied and frequent post-training job-search behavior....

    For over a decade, the issues of welfare reform and unemployment have been high priorities at the national level. Surveys were administered to participants in three training agencies to examine individual pre-training attitudinal and behavioral variables, including self-efficacy, employment commitment, and unemployment negativity. The study then examined the relationship between these variables and post-training job-search behavior, employment status, and job-search intended effort of unemployed trainees. The behavioral plasticity hypothesis was also explored in conjunction with the variables of general and specific self-efficacy, employment commitment, and unemployment negativity. Hierarchical regression analyses of data from 121 participants revealed that pre-training specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity were both significant predictors of post-training job-search behavior and frequency. Thus, trainees with higher levels of pre-training specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity also reported more varied and frequent post-training job-search behavior. Further, results of logistic regression analysis indicated that unemployment negativity was a significant predictor of post-training employment status. Specifically, trainees with high initial levels of unemployment negativity were twice as likely to find post-training employment. Although not hypothesized, the demographic variables of marital status, reasons for unemployment, and income also significantly predicted post-training employment status. More specifically, trainees who were single had a greater likelihood of post-training job placement in comparison to married trainees. Further, respondents who were unemployed because of a disability or other health-related issue were less likely to find employment after training than their counterparts. In addition, trainees with higher levels of income were more likely to find post-training employment than those with lower income levels. The behavioral plasticity effect, however, was not supported with either predictor variable when job-search behavior and frequency was used as the outcome variable. Post-hoc analysis revealed pre-training employment commitment as a significant predictor of post-training employment status. Specifically, participants with higher levels of pre-training employment commitment were almost three-times more likely to find employment after training than their counterparts. Post-hoc analyses also found that both specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity mediate the relationship between employment commitment and post-training job-search behavior and frequency. Several implications of the study are discussed and areas for future research are explored. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Holland, Deborah Evelyn
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2007

    This study examined the issues of barriers and employment retention in a rural county welfare-to-work setting, the Missoula, Montana WoRC Program. Qualitative research (study one) was conducted, to interview clients regarding reasons why they had lost jobs in the past, and, to elicit their suggestions regarding new services the WoRC Program could offer to help with employment retention at future jobs. Study one results indicated that the primary barriers resulting in job loss were: family issues; medical problems; mental health disorders; work site difficulties; and other (i.e. boredom, attitude problems). Work adjustment proved to be an underlying barrier to employment retention. Study one results demonstrated that the clients wanted three primary services to help resolve barriers and improve job retention: life skills classes teaching work adjustment; job coaching; and post-TANF supportive services (i.e. clothing and gas vouchers). Quantitative research (study two) was conducted to analyze 90 variables via logistic regression and determine whether or not the WoRC Program...

    This study examined the issues of barriers and employment retention in a rural county welfare-to-work setting, the Missoula, Montana WoRC Program. Qualitative research (study one) was conducted, to interview clients regarding reasons why they had lost jobs in the past, and, to elicit their suggestions regarding new services the WoRC Program could offer to help with employment retention at future jobs. Study one results indicated that the primary barriers resulting in job loss were: family issues; medical problems; mental health disorders; work site difficulties; and other (i.e. boredom, attitude problems). Work adjustment proved to be an underlying barrier to employment retention. Study one results demonstrated that the clients wanted three primary services to help resolve barriers and improve job retention: life skills classes teaching work adjustment; job coaching; and post-TANF supportive services (i.e. clothing and gas vouchers). Quantitative research (study two) was conducted to analyze 90 variables via logistic regression and determine whether or not the WoRC Program assisted clients with gaining employment, and if so, what the characteristics of those clients were. The results of the logistic regression indicated that the WoRC Program helped clients gain employment exactly 50% of the time. Statistically significant variables for clients that gained employment were: study one participant; female; on TANF 4+ months; final status (case closed at time of study); merit (not sanctioned); no short term training months; no learning disability; no domestic violence; and no chemical dependency. Linear regression was utilized to determine whether or not the employment WoRC clients gained paid better than the minimum wage. The results of the linear regression demonstrated that the mean wage for the employed study two clients was $7.16/hr. The Federal minimum wage at the time of the study was $5.15/hr. To place this study in context, the literature review traced the development of the welfare system from ancient times to the present day, with special emphasis on the topics of cycling, barriers and retention, as well as intangible factors that may have contributed to the study results. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schmoker, Alicia
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2014

    The time of transition from adolescents to adulthood is a difficult one for many individuals, disability or not. One of the biggest challenges within this large developmental milestone is that of transitioning from secondary education to competitive employment or post-secondary education. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a continuum of disorders that impact an individual’s ability to function in daily life. The impacts of ASD range from mild to severe. This disorder is believed to be persistent and one that commonly causes significant social, communication, and behavioral challenges that can result in lifelong adjustment needs and supports. These autistic symptoms have often been found to affect an individual’s ability to handle transitions as well as finding and maintaining competitive employment. Over the recent years, studies have shown competitive employment rates of individuals with ASD ranging between 6%-10%. Contributing factors to these low employment rates include ineffective and inappropriate transition planning for students with ASD, as well as poor...

    The time of transition from adolescents to adulthood is a difficult one for many individuals, disability or not. One of the biggest challenges within this large developmental milestone is that of transitioning from secondary education to competitive employment or post-secondary education. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a continuum of disorders that impact an individual’s ability to function in daily life. The impacts of ASD range from mild to severe. This disorder is believed to be persistent and one that commonly causes significant social, communication, and behavioral challenges that can result in lifelong adjustment needs and supports. These autistic symptoms have often been found to affect an individual’s ability to handle transitions as well as finding and maintaining competitive employment. Over the recent years, studies have shown competitive employment rates of individuals with ASD ranging between 6%-10%. Contributing factors to these low employment rates include ineffective and inappropriate transition planning for students with ASD, as well as poor collaboration between education, employment, and community agencies. Therefore, a need has been identified, by both literature and professionals, to begin a collaborative autism focused transition model to prepare students with mid to high-functioning autism spectrum disorder for competitive employment and post-secondary education. The INVEST program provides micro, mezzo, and macro levels of intervention in order to address identified improvement areas for future transition service development including early intervention, motivation, school and adult service collaboration, multi-system transition planning collaboration, and autism awareness training. (author abstract) 

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