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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Lavin, Ewa U.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2013

    Outcome research has shown that upon aging out of the foster care system, many young adults struggle during their transition to independence. Youth who age out are less likely than their peers in the general population to achieve academic success, including high school graduation and post-secondary education. These youth are more likely to be unemployed or work at jobs that do not provide them with financial security. They are more likely than their peers to experience violence, victimization, homelessness or unstable housing, mental illness, and other poor health outcomes. They are also at an increased risk for incarceration, substance abuse, and early parenthood; and they are more likely to lose their children to the foster care system. The current study seeks to examine experiences foster care alumni identify as empowering and promoting resilience. By identifying elements that contributed to building self-sufficiency and positive outcomes, this research attempts to inform practitioners, policy makers, and other stakeholders as they attempt to move towards best practices of...

    Outcome research has shown that upon aging out of the foster care system, many young adults struggle during their transition to independence. Youth who age out are less likely than their peers in the general population to achieve academic success, including high school graduation and post-secondary education. These youth are more likely to be unemployed or work at jobs that do not provide them with financial security. They are more likely than their peers to experience violence, victimization, homelessness or unstable housing, mental illness, and other poor health outcomes. They are also at an increased risk for incarceration, substance abuse, and early parenthood; and they are more likely to lose their children to the foster care system. The current study seeks to examine experiences foster care alumni identify as empowering and promoting resilience. By identifying elements that contributed to building self-sufficiency and positive outcomes, this research attempts to inform practitioners, policy makers, and other stakeholders as they attempt to move towards best practices of effective service delivery. Data were collected by conducting semi-structured interviews with four foster care alumni who were in care in New Jersey. Transcribed interview data was analyzed utilizing McCracken’s “grounded theory” as a guide. Data was reduced to smaller units for identification of common, interrelated themes. These themes and patterns were subjected to a process of analysis in an attempt to inform conclusions. Participants credit their positive outcomes, post transition, to several factors, which include the impact of relationships and mentoring, as well as other intrinsic and environmental factors. Study participants offered several recommendations for policy and program reform. The relationship of findings to literature, limitations and implications of the current study for practice and research are discussed. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hall, Crystal Celestine
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2008

    In three parts, I explore factors contributing to the behavior of low-income individuals. Specifically, I have identified issues relating to trust, mental accounting and self-affirmation. First, in Studies 1-3, I explore the extent to which concerns of trust drive preferences for financial contracts of low-income individuals versus the wealthy. In a nutshell, I find that when selecting among contracts for buying or selling a good or service, low-income respondents (relative to the more wealthy) appear to weigh the perceived trustworthiness of the contract partner more heavily (as opposed to focusing on the financial terms of the contract). In addition, I explore self-reported rationales for these choices and general notions of trustworthiness among low and high-income groups.

    Studies 4-5 show that low-income individuals do not reliably replicate a well-established finding regarding savings preference. Specifically, when considering spending time to travel in order to save a certain amount of money, low-income participants do not consistently show a preference for savings...

    In three parts, I explore factors contributing to the behavior of low-income individuals. Specifically, I have identified issues relating to trust, mental accounting and self-affirmation. First, in Studies 1-3, I explore the extent to which concerns of trust drive preferences for financial contracts of low-income individuals versus the wealthy. In a nutshell, I find that when selecting among contracts for buying or selling a good or service, low-income respondents (relative to the more wealthy) appear to weigh the perceived trustworthiness of the contract partner more heavily (as opposed to focusing on the financial terms of the contract). In addition, I explore self-reported rationales for these choices and general notions of trustworthiness among low and high-income groups.

    Studies 4-5 show that low-income individuals do not reliably replicate a well-established finding regarding savings preference. Specifically, when considering spending time to travel in order to save a certain amount of money, low-income participants do not consistently show a preference for savings on proportionally larger sums of money (as has been previously demonstrated in this literature). Instead, they seem to focus more on absolute amounts of savings.

    In Study 6, I use a self-affirmation intervention on a group of low-income individuals. Self-affirmation theory is based on the general premise that individuals are motivated to protect their perceived sense of self-worth. When used as a behavioral intervention, affirmation has been shown to attenuate or eliminate the effects of a host of psychological phenomena, including those related to stereotype threat. After random assignment to either a self-affirmation or neutral condition, participants' interest in a financial benefits program is measured. Individuals who have been affirmed show a greater likelihood of accepting information about the Earned Income Tax Credit program.

    In sum, I argue that there are subtle differences in what features low versus high-income groups focus on. Generalizing from the findings of high-income individuals causes these nuances to be overlooked. From a practical standpoint, a better understanding of the nuanced differences between low and high-income decision makers can facilitate the development of more efficient policies and programs targeted at lower income populations. (author abstract)