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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Census Bureau
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2010

    Description: The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data annually with an aim to give communities the current information they need to plan investments and services.

    Population: The survey is mailed to three million Americans per year (250,000 monthly) in order to get a nationally representative sample. Approximately two million interviews conducted per year, with some personal visit follow-up.

    Periodicity: 2005-2017 and will continue annually.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: benefits, expenses

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

    Description: The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that provides data annually with an aim to give communities the current information they need to plan investments and services.

    Population: The survey is mailed to three million Americans per year (250,000 monthly) in order to get a nationally representative sample. Approximately two million interviews conducted per year, with some personal visit follow-up.

    Periodicity: 2005-2017 and will continue annually.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: benefits, expenses

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Stacy, Christina; Craigie, Terry-Ann; Meixell, Brady; MacDonald, Graham; Zheng, Sihan Vivian; Davis, Christopher; Baird, Christina; Chartoff, Ben; Hinson, David; Lei, Serena
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2019

    In many cities, low-income residents live far from available jobs, and employers can’t find people to fill open positions. Economists call this “spatial mismatch”—a mismatch between where jobs are located and where job seekers live, which can cause high unemployment rates and lead to longer spells of joblessness. Data from Snag, the largest online marketplace for hourly jobs, show us that this is true for job seekers who use their platform. Snag data capture a large number of low-wage job seekers in each metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Looking at 2017, the most recent year of data, we analyzed the distance between every job seeker and the jobs they applied for, allowing us to map out spatial mismatch. And we talked to local government and workforce officials in two regions to learn what they’re doing to overcome this problem. (Author introduction modified)

    In many cities, low-income residents live far from available jobs, and employers can’t find people to fill open positions. Economists call this “spatial mismatch”—a mismatch between where jobs are located and where job seekers live, which can cause high unemployment rates and lead to longer spells of joblessness. Data from Snag, the largest online marketplace for hourly jobs, show us that this is true for job seekers who use their platform. Snag data capture a large number of low-wage job seekers in each metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Looking at 2017, the most recent year of data, we analyzed the distance between every job seeker and the jobs they applied for, allowing us to map out spatial mismatch. And we talked to local government and workforce officials in two regions to learn what they’re doing to overcome this problem. (Author introduction modified)