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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Discussion about the extent to which the government could and should invest in the child care market has increased among policymakers. This report summarizes a conference convened by ASPE to engage a multidisciplinary group of economists, developmental psychologists, child care researchers, and policy analysts in a dialogue about the rationale for public investment in quality child care. (author abstract)

    Discussion about the extent to which the government could and should invest in the child care market has increased among policymakers. This report summarizes a conference convened by ASPE to engage a multidisciplinary group of economists, developmental psychologists, child care researchers, and policy analysts in a dialogue about the rationale for public investment in quality child care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Crosby, Danielle A. ; Gennetian, Lisa A. ; Huston, Aletha C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Child care plays a unique dual role in welfare and employment programs, providing both a critical support for parents seeking and sustaining employment, as well as a context for the cognitive, behavioral, and social development of their children. We examine the effects of 13 experimental welfare and employment programs on single parents’ use of child care for their preschool and young school-age children. Parents of pre- and young school-aged children still have important child care needs. In fact, policies designed to encourage employment (e.g., earnings supplements and mandated participation) increase the likelihood of employment and the likelihood that parents will use any child care for these children. Furthermore, policies designed to support paid or regulated care embedded in welfare and employment programs affect the types of care used, encouraging the use of formal rather than home-based care. These findings suggest that even for children who are in school for part of the day, parental preferences for care and market supply conditions, child care assistance can expand low...

    Child care plays a unique dual role in welfare and employment programs, providing both a critical support for parents seeking and sustaining employment, as well as a context for the cognitive, behavioral, and social development of their children. We examine the effects of 13 experimental welfare and employment programs on single parents’ use of child care for their preschool and young school-age children. Parents of pre- and young school-aged children still have important child care needs. In fact, policies designed to encourage employment (e.g., earnings supplements and mandated participation) increase the likelihood of employment and the likelihood that parents will use any child care for these children. Furthermore, policies designed to support paid or regulated care embedded in welfare and employment programs affect the types of care used, encouraging the use of formal rather than home-based care. These findings suggest that even for children who are in school for part of the day, parental preferences for care and market supply conditions, child care assistance can expand low-income parents’ options for combining work and family responsibilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin; Huber, Erika; Giannarelli, Linda
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The CCDF Policies Database Book of Tables provides tables containing key Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) policies for each state as of October 1, 2011. The tables are based on information in the CCDF Policies Database, a database tracking state child care subsidy policies over time and across the States, D.C., and the Territories. The Book summarizes a subset of the information available in the database, including information about eligibility requirements for families; application, redetermination, priority, and waiting list policies; family copayments; and provider policies and reimbursement rates. The 2011 Book also includes a complete set of 2010 tables. (author abstract)

    The CCDF Policies Database Book of Tables provides tables containing key Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) policies for each state as of October 1, 2011. The tables are based on information in the CCDF Policies Database, a database tracking state child care subsidy policies over time and across the States, D.C., and the Territories. The Book summarizes a subset of the information available in the database, including information about eligibility requirements for families; application, redetermination, priority, and waiting list policies; family copayments; and provider policies and reimbursement rates. The 2011 Book also includes a complete set of 2010 tables. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Morris, Pamela; Michalopoulos, Charles
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This is the latest in a series of reports on the Self-Sufficiency Project. SSP is a test of a strategy to “make work pay” as a way of simultaneously addressing the problems of poverty and dependency. The participants in SSP were all single parents who had been receiving Income Assistance (IA) benefits for at least a year and, in many cases, much longer. The program that SSP offered them was a generous, but temporary, supplement to their earnings if they went to work full time and ceased receiving Income Assistance. The goal of SSP is to see whether this form of incentive is an effective way of putting more money into the hands of poor families and, at the same time, of encouraging work as a way to achieve greater economic self-sufficiency.

    The Self-Sufficiency Project is a rigorous research project that uses a random assignment evaluation design generally accepted to be the most reliable way of measuring program impacts. This is a long-term study that, ultimately, will last 10 years from start to finish.

    The opening chapters of the unfolding SSP story have been...

    This is the latest in a series of reports on the Self-Sufficiency Project. SSP is a test of a strategy to “make work pay” as a way of simultaneously addressing the problems of poverty and dependency. The participants in SSP were all single parents who had been receiving Income Assistance (IA) benefits for at least a year and, in many cases, much longer. The program that SSP offered them was a generous, but temporary, supplement to their earnings if they went to work full time and ceased receiving Income Assistance. The goal of SSP is to see whether this form of incentive is an effective way of putting more money into the hands of poor families and, at the same time, of encouraging work as a way to achieve greater economic self-sufficiency.

    The Self-Sufficiency Project is a rigorous research project that uses a random assignment evaluation design generally accepted to be the most reliable way of measuring program impacts. This is a long-term study that, ultimately, will last 10 years from start to finish.

    The opening chapters of the unfolding SSP story have been exciting. Previous reports have shown that significant numbers of single-parent, long-term IA recipients are willing and able to leave welfare for work if employment can be made a financially rewarding alternative; that SSP’s short-term impacts on full-time employment and earnings are among the largest ever seen in a rigorously evaluated welfare-to-work program; and that the effects can be even larger when the program is provided to a somewhat less disadvantaged group of IA recipients or when financial incentives are offered in combination with employment services.

    The previously published results have been based on what happened in the first 18 months after participants became eligible for SSP’s offer of financial assistance. In a companion report to this one, entitled The Self-Sufficiency Project at 36 Months: Effects of a Financial Work Incentive on Employment and Income, the results are extended for a further 18 months and show that, after 36 months, SSP’s impacts on the labour market experiences of participants remain substantial.

    SSP’s evaluation is not limited to the economic circumstances of the single parents taking part. The project is also examining the effects SSP may have had on family functioning and on the well-being of the children in these families. The results presented here show that, overall, SSP had few effects and those that were observed were quite small. For example, there is no evidence of any effects on the youngest children’s functioning. There were small positive effects on children’s cognitive and school outcomes for those in a middle-age cohort. And among the oldest children, SSP may have produced small negative effects.

    About six months ago, the operational phase of SSP concluded when the last of its participants reached the end of the period during which they were eligible to receive earnings supplements. Longer-term program impacts will be based on a subsequent survey of participants’ post-program experiences. However, we believe that the findings that SSP has produced so far are already providing policy-makers with much useful evidence to guide social policy development. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schmit, Stephanie
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    Since 1965, the Head Start program has served low-income 3- and 4-year-old children and their families with comprehensive early education and support services. Programs provide services focused on the “whole child,” including early education addressing cognitive, developmental, and socio-emotional needs; medical and dental screenings and referrals; nutritional services; parental involvement activities and referrals to social service providers for the entire family; and mental health services.

    All Head Start programs (including Head Start preschool programs, Early Head Start, and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start) are required to complete the Program Information Report (PIR) on an annual basis.1 The PIR collects data on all children and pregnant women who participate in Head Start at any point during the program year, including those who do not complete the year.

    This fact sheet uses information reported through PIR to describe the children and families enrolled in the Head Start preschool program and the services provided to them during the 2010-2011 program year.2 (...

    Since 1965, the Head Start program has served low-income 3- and 4-year-old children and their families with comprehensive early education and support services. Programs provide services focused on the “whole child,” including early education addressing cognitive, developmental, and socio-emotional needs; medical and dental screenings and referrals; nutritional services; parental involvement activities and referrals to social service providers for the entire family; and mental health services.

    All Head Start programs (including Head Start preschool programs, Early Head Start, and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start) are required to complete the Program Information Report (PIR) on an annual basis.1 The PIR collects data on all children and pregnant women who participate in Head Start at any point during the program year, including those who do not complete the year.

    This fact sheet uses information reported through PIR to describe the children and families enrolled in the Head Start preschool program and the services provided to them during the 2010-2011 program year.2 (author abstract)

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