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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Choi, Jeong-Kyun; Pyun, Ho-Soon
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    This study examines the relationships among nonresident fathers’ financial support, informal instrumental support, mothers’ parenting and parenting stress, and their children’s behavioral and cognitive development in single-mother families with low income. Informed by stress-coping and social support models, this study estimates the mediating effects of nonresident fathers’ financial support on children’s outcomes transmitted through mothers’ parenting and parenting stress. The analyses use the longitudinal data from a subsample of 679 single mothers in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Results suggest that nonresident fathers’ financial support is directly associated with children’s cognitive development. Nonresident fathers’ financial support is found to have indirect effects on children’s behavior problems and cognitive development transmitted through mothers’ parenting and parenting stress. Informal instrumental support is directly and indirectly associated with both outcomes of children transmitted through maternal economic hardship, parenting, and parenting...

    This study examines the relationships among nonresident fathers’ financial support, informal instrumental support, mothers’ parenting and parenting stress, and their children’s behavioral and cognitive development in single-mother families with low income. Informed by stress-coping and social support models, this study estimates the mediating effects of nonresident fathers’ financial support on children’s outcomes transmitted through mothers’ parenting and parenting stress. The analyses use the longitudinal data from a subsample of 679 single mothers in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Results suggest that nonresident fathers’ financial support is directly associated with children’s cognitive development. Nonresident fathers’ financial support is found to have indirect effects on children’s behavior problems and cognitive development transmitted through mothers’ parenting and parenting stress. Informal instrumental support is directly and indirectly associated with both outcomes of children transmitted through maternal economic hardship, parenting, and parenting stress. The study discusses the policy and practice implications of these findings. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schmidt, Lucie; Danziger, Sheldon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    We analyze SSI applications and benefit receipt after the 1996 welfare reform by single mothers who received cash assistance in February 1997. We address these questions: First, what characteristics are associated with SSI applications and how do they differ between successful and unsuccessful applicants? Second, to what extent is SSI application and receipt status associated with material hardships? We find that unsuccessful applicants and SSI recipients have similar characteristics and that changes in physical and mental health problems during the panel are associated with new SSI applications. Both SSI recipients and unsuccessful applicants are significantly more likely to report any material hardship than those who did not apply for benefits. However, unsuccessful applicants report a significantly higher number of hardships. These results suggest the need for a temporary disability program for individuals whose physical and mental health problems limit their work, but whose disabilities do not meet the strict standards of SSI. (author abstract)

    We analyze SSI applications and benefit receipt after the 1996 welfare reform by single mothers who received cash assistance in February 1997. We address these questions: First, what characteristics are associated with SSI applications and how do they differ between successful and unsuccessful applicants? Second, to what extent is SSI application and receipt status associated with material hardships? We find that unsuccessful applicants and SSI recipients have similar characteristics and that changes in physical and mental health problems during the panel are associated with new SSI applications. Both SSI recipients and unsuccessful applicants are significantly more likely to report any material hardship than those who did not apply for benefits. However, unsuccessful applicants report a significantly higher number of hardships. These results suggest the need for a temporary disability program for individuals whose physical and mental health problems limit their work, but whose disabilities do not meet the strict standards of SSI. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Craigie, Terry-Ann; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Waldfogel, Jane
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    This study exploits data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a birth cohort study of a diverse sample of children from 20 cities in the United States (N = 3,676), to examine how cognitive, behavioural and health outcomes of five-year-old children differ according to their family structure and family stability. We define three models: one that measures family structure at birth only, a second that measures current family structure at year five conditional on family structure at birth, and a third that measures changes in family structure from birth to age five. We find that while family structure has persistent links to early child outcomes, the effects are significantly altered by stability of the family structure over time. These findings remain robust even after addressing selection. (author abstract)

    This study exploits data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a birth cohort study of a diverse sample of children from 20 cities in the United States (N = 3,676), to examine how cognitive, behavioural and health outcomes of five-year-old children differ according to their family structure and family stability. We define three models: one that measures family structure at birth only, a second that measures current family structure at year five conditional on family structure at birth, and a third that measures changes in family structure from birth to age five. We find that while family structure has persistent links to early child outcomes, the effects are significantly altered by stability of the family structure over time. These findings remain robust even after addressing selection. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Miller, Cynthia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    After its first 18 months, the Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP) produced substantial effects on the employment and earnings of single-parent, long-term recipients in urban areas. Subsequent analyses revealed that the program had notably different effects on recipients who were in public or subsidized housing at program entry compared with those who were not. Specifically, MFIP's impacts on employment and earnings were larger for the former group. This paper presents MFIP's 18-month impacts by housing status and examines several possible reasons for the pattern of impacts.

    The results indicate that public and subsidized housing does provide benefits, such as residential stability, that may encourage employment, but that these benefits are unlikely to account for the pattern of MFIP’s impacts. The weight of the evidence, although indirect, suggests that another aspect of public and subsidized housing may be important. The work disincentive created by the rent rule may have led to a situation in which many residents in public and subsidized housing were especially...

    After its first 18 months, the Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP) produced substantial effects on the employment and earnings of single-parent, long-term recipients in urban areas. Subsequent analyses revealed that the program had notably different effects on recipients who were in public or subsidized housing at program entry compared with those who were not. Specifically, MFIP's impacts on employment and earnings were larger for the former group. This paper presents MFIP's 18-month impacts by housing status and examines several possible reasons for the pattern of impacts.

    The results indicate that public and subsidized housing does provide benefits, such as residential stability, that may encourage employment, but that these benefits are unlikely to account for the pattern of MFIP’s impacts. The weight of the evidence, although indirect, suggests that another aspect of public and subsidized housing may be important. The work disincentive created by the rent rule may have led to a situation in which many residents in public and subsidized housing were especially responsive to MFIP’s employment incentives. The evidence on this issue is only suggestive, however, highlighting the need for further research on the interaction between public housing and welfare reform. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Hildebrandt, Eugenie; Kelber, Sheryl T.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    We compare the experiences of women from three studies who were in different stages of participation in the U.S. welfare program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). The setting for the studies was a large Midwest urban county, targeted chain referral sampling was used, and the combined sample of the three studies was 106 women. The instruments were a semi-structured interview guide, the HANES General Well-Being Schedule and a demographic data form. Quantitative data are augmented with qualitative interview data. The findings suggest barriers to self-sustaining employment include health challenges, limited education, socio-economic marginalization, and the welfare policy itself. Nurses are well positioned to advocate for women in poverty and mitigate the health challenges they face. The findings add to the limited evidence base on which the TANF policy is based and can be used to modify the policy to increase the success of the women who participate in it. (author abstract)

    We compare the experiences of women from three studies who were in different stages of participation in the U.S. welfare program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). The setting for the studies was a large Midwest urban county, targeted chain referral sampling was used, and the combined sample of the three studies was 106 women. The instruments were a semi-structured interview guide, the HANES General Well-Being Schedule and a demographic data form. Quantitative data are augmented with qualitative interview data. The findings suggest barriers to self-sustaining employment include health challenges, limited education, socio-economic marginalization, and the welfare policy itself. Nurses are well positioned to advocate for women in poverty and mitigate the health challenges they face. The findings add to the limited evidence base on which the TANF policy is based and can be used to modify the policy to increase the success of the women who participate in it. (author abstract)

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