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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Solomon-Fears, Carmen; Falk, Gene; Fernandes-Alcantara, Adrienne L.
    Year: 2013

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the...

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the policy community that might improve the lives of low-income noncustodial fathers and their children. For example, social policy could play a role by expanding economic assistance programs to noncustodial fathers, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); and implementing strategies to prevent the build-up of unpaid child support through early intervention. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality; The Russell Sage Foundation
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2013

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

  • Individual Author: Stack, Carol
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1975

    All Our Kin is the chronicle of a young white woman's sojourn into The Flats, an African-American ghetto community, to study the support system family and friends form when coping with poverty. Eschewing the traditional method of entry into the community used by anthropologists -- through authority figures and community leaders -- she approached the families herself by way of an acquaintance from school, becoming one of the first sociologists to explore the black kinship network from the inside. The result was a landmark study that debunked the misconception that poor families were unstable and disorganized. On the contrary, her study showed that families in The Flats adapted to their poverty conditions by forming large, resilient, lifelong support networks based on friendship and family that were very powerful, highly structured and surprisingly complex.

    Universally considered the best analysis of family and kinship in a ghetto black community ever published, All Our Kin is also an indictment of a social system that reinforces welfare dependency and...

    All Our Kin is the chronicle of a young white woman's sojourn into The Flats, an African-American ghetto community, to study the support system family and friends form when coping with poverty. Eschewing the traditional method of entry into the community used by anthropologists -- through authority figures and community leaders -- she approached the families herself by way of an acquaintance from school, becoming one of the first sociologists to explore the black kinship network from the inside. The result was a landmark study that debunked the misconception that poor families were unstable and disorganized. On the contrary, her study showed that families in The Flats adapted to their poverty conditions by forming large, resilient, lifelong support networks based on friendship and family that were very powerful, highly structured and surprisingly complex.

    Universally considered the best analysis of family and kinship in a ghetto black community ever published, All Our Kin is also an indictment of a social system that reinforces welfare dependency and chronic unemployment. As today's political debate over welfare reform heats up, its message has become more important than ever. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zill, Nicholas; Furstenberg, Frank Jr.; Peterson, James; Moore, Kristin
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 1990

    Description: The National Survey of Children (NSC) was designed to assess the physical, social, and psychological well-being of American children, to develop a national profile of the way children in the United States live, to permit analysis of the relationships between the conditions of children's lives and measures of child development, and to examine the effects of marital disruption on the development of children and on the operation of single and multi-parent families. Information is provided on the child's well-being, family, experiences with family disruption, behavior, physical health, and mental health.

    Population: Children between the ages of seven and 11, or born between September 1, 1964 and December 31, 1969, living in households in the 48 contiguous states.

    Periodicity: Data collected and available for all three waves – 1976, 1981, 1987.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Child development, fertility, family structure.

    (Information adapted from the...

    Description: The National Survey of Children (NSC) was designed to assess the physical, social, and psychological well-being of American children, to develop a national profile of the way children in the United States live, to permit analysis of the relationships between the conditions of children's lives and measures of child development, and to examine the effects of marital disruption on the development of children and on the operation of single and multi-parent families. Information is provided on the child's well-being, family, experiences with family disruption, behavior, physical health, and mental health.

    Population: Children between the ages of seven and 11, or born between September 1, 1964 and December 31, 1969, living in households in the 48 contiguous states.

    Periodicity: Data collected and available for all three waves – 1976, 1981, 1987.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Child development, fertility, family structure.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Macomber, Jennifer Ehrle; Geen, Rob; Clark, Rebecca L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    This brief documents the numbers of children living in different types of kinship environments, some characteristics of these environments, and the services these children receive. Findings are based on data from the 1997 National Survey of America’s Families (NSAF), a nationally representative survey of households with persons under the age of 65. It includes measures of the economic, health, and social characteristics of more than 44,000 households. This analysis uses information from the sample of children under age 18. Information was obtained from the most knowledgeable adult in the household, the parent or caretaker most knowledgeable about the child’s education and health care. This paper refers to these knowledgeable adults as "caregivers." (author abstract)

    This brief documents the numbers of children living in different types of kinship environments, some characteristics of these environments, and the services these children receive. Findings are based on data from the 1997 National Survey of America’s Families (NSAF), a nationally representative survey of households with persons under the age of 65. It includes measures of the economic, health, and social characteristics of more than 44,000 households. This analysis uses information from the sample of children under age 18. Information was obtained from the most knowledgeable adult in the household, the parent or caretaker most knowledgeable about the child’s education and health care. This paper refers to these knowledgeable adults as "caregivers." (author abstract)

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