Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Levin-Epstein, Jodie
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    The author describes how state and city governments are taking the lead in giving visibility to poverty and opportunity through task-force initiatives, summits, and state poverty targets. (author abstract)

    The author describes how state and city governments are taking the lead in giving visibility to poverty and opportunity through task-force initiatives, summits, and state poverty targets. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Annie E. Casey Foundation
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2010

    Description: Making Connections is the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s long-term, multi-site effort to demonstrate that poor results for children and families in tough neighborhoods can be changed for the better.

    Population: Sites in Denver, Des Moines, Hartford, Indianapolis, Louisville, Milwaukee, Oakland, Providence, San Antonio, and Seattle. Aimed at improving outcomes of children and families in tough/isolated neighborhoods and communities, as well as outcomes for the communities as a whole.

    Periodicity: Started in 1999, 10 year initiative. Data collected periodically throughout each year.

    Researchers can apply for access to three waves of the neighborhood survey data and baseline countywide RDD survey data for Denver, Des Moines, Louisville, Indianapolis, Providence, San Antonio, and White Center (Seattle) and two waves of the neighborhood survey data and baseline countywide RDD survey data for Milwaukee, Oakland, and Hartford through NORC's data enclave. Learn more about the data and get information on...

    Description: Making Connections is the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s long-term, multi-site effort to demonstrate that poor results for children and families in tough neighborhoods can be changed for the better.

    Population: Sites in Denver, Des Moines, Hartford, Indianapolis, Louisville, Milwaukee, Oakland, Providence, San Antonio, and Seattle. Aimed at improving outcomes of children and families in tough/isolated neighborhoods and communities, as well as outcomes for the communities as a whole.

    Periodicity: Started in 1999, 10 year initiative. Data collected periodically throughout each year.

    Researchers can apply for access to three waves of the neighborhood survey data and baseline countywide RDD survey data for Denver, Des Moines, Louisville, Indianapolis, Providence, San Antonio, and White Center (Seattle) and two waves of the neighborhood survey data and baseline countywide RDD survey data for Milwaukee, Oakland, and Hartford through NORC's data enclave. Learn more about the data and get information on accessing the data here.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    Recognizing that census data can be unwieldy to work with, the Boston Fed has created a powerful, time-saving, easy-to-use tool for people interested in the New England region. The tool uses 2000 and 2009 census data to compare the demographic characteristics of lower-income and higher-income areas within a city. It also provides aggregate information for New England states and for the region as a whole. From detailed analyses to a one-page summary, the tool makes census data accessible. (author abstract)

    This resource is periodically updated with newer data.

    Recognizing that census data can be unwieldy to work with, the Boston Fed has created a powerful, time-saving, easy-to-use tool for people interested in the New England region. The tool uses 2000 and 2009 census data to compare the demographic characteristics of lower-income and higher-income areas within a city. It also provides aggregate information for New England states and for the region as a whole. From detailed analyses to a one-page summary, the tool makes census data accessible. (author abstract)

    This resource is periodically updated with newer data.

  • Individual Author: Aizer, Anna; Stroud, Laura; Buka, Stephen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    We study how maternal stress affects offspring outcomes. We find that in-utero exposure to elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol negatively affects offspring cognition, health and educational attainment. These findings are based on comparisons between siblings which limits variation to short-lived shocks and controls for unobserved differences between mothers that could bias estimates. Our results are consistent with recent experimental results in the neurobiological literature linking exogenous exposure to stress hormones in-utero with declines in offspring cognitive, behavioral and motor development. Moreover, we find that not only are mothers with low levels of human capital characterized by higher and more variable cortisol levels, but that the negative impact of elevated cortisol is greater for them. These results suggest that prenatal stress may play a role in the intergenerational persistence of poverty. (author abstract)

    We study how maternal stress affects offspring outcomes. We find that in-utero exposure to elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol negatively affects offspring cognition, health and educational attainment. These findings are based on comparisons between siblings which limits variation to short-lived shocks and controls for unobserved differences between mothers that could bias estimates. Our results are consistent with recent experimental results in the neurobiological literature linking exogenous exposure to stress hormones in-utero with declines in offspring cognitive, behavioral and motor development. Moreover, we find that not only are mothers with low levels of human capital characterized by higher and more variable cortisol levels, but that the negative impact of elevated cortisol is greater for them. These results suggest that prenatal stress may play a role in the intergenerational persistence of poverty. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mauricio, Kaili
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    The maximum rent in public housing, established by the 1981 Housing and Community Development Act, is 30 percent of family income. Using that as a benchmark for all renters—and looking at the American Community Survey’s data on gross rent as a percentage of income— can suggest the rent burden for New Englanders. Gross rent includes estimated utility payments, often a large percentage of the rent in lower-rent households. (author abstract)

    The maximum rent in public housing, established by the 1981 Housing and Community Development Act, is 30 percent of family income. Using that as a benchmark for all renters—and looking at the American Community Survey’s data on gross rent as a percentage of income— can suggest the rent burden for New Englanders. Gross rent includes estimated utility payments, often a large percentage of the rent in lower-rent households. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2007 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations