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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Fisher, Gordon M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    A “standard budget” is a list of goods and services that a family of a specified size and composition–and sometimes of a specified social class or occupational group–would need to live at a designated level of well-being, together with the estimated monthly or annual costs of those goods and services. Other terms used for the “standard budget” concept in recent American literature include “basic needs budget,” “family budget,” and “expert budget.” In other countries such as Britain and Australia, the term used for this concept in recent literature is “budget standard(s)”.

    Since about 1990, a number of analysts have developed standard budgets in the United States, Britain, Australia, Canada, Ireland, and other countries. For a paper reviewing this work from about 1990 through 2006, see Fisher (2007).

    The present paper updates the 2007 paper for the U. S. only, covering work since 2006. The majority of budgets referenced are...

    A “standard budget” is a list of goods and services that a family of a specified size and composition–and sometimes of a specified social class or occupational group–would need to live at a designated level of well-being, together with the estimated monthly or annual costs of those goods and services. Other terms used for the “standard budget” concept in recent American literature include “basic needs budget,” “family budget,” and “expert budget.” In other countries such as Britain and Australia, the term used for this concept in recent literature is “budget standard(s)”.

    Since about 1990, a number of analysts have developed standard budgets in the United States, Britain, Australia, Canada, Ireland, and other countries. For a paper reviewing this work from about 1990 through 2006, see Fisher (2007).

    The present paper updates the 2007 paper for the U. S. only, covering work since 2006. The majority of budgets referenced are still for working-age families with children at a “no-frills” standard of living, but there are more exceptions to that generalization than there were during the 1990-2006 period. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Chilton, Mariana; Coates, Spencer; Doar, Robert; Everett, Jeremy; Finn, Susan ; Frank, Deborah ; Jamason, Cherie ; Shore, Billy; Sykes, Russell
    Year: 2015

    To identify solutions to hunger, Congress created the bipartisan National Commission on Hunger “to provide policy recommendations to Congress and the USDA Secretary to more effectively use existing programs and funds of the Department of Agriculture to combat domestic hunger and food insecurity.”

    This report is based on the commission members’ full agreement that hunger cannot be solved by food alone, nor by government efforts alone. The solutions to hunger require a stronger economy, robust community engagement, corporate partnerships, and greater personal responsibility, as well as strong government programs. (Author executive summary)

    To identify solutions to hunger, Congress created the bipartisan National Commission on Hunger “to provide policy recommendations to Congress and the USDA Secretary to more effectively use existing programs and funds of the Department of Agriculture to combat domestic hunger and food insecurity.”

    This report is based on the commission members’ full agreement that hunger cannot be solved by food alone, nor by government efforts alone. The solutions to hunger require a stronger economy, robust community engagement, corporate partnerships, and greater personal responsibility, as well as strong government programs. (Author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Ahn, Suran; Song, Na Kyoung
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    This study examined the relationships between unemployment experience and recurrent unemployment and the four types of material hardships faced by older adults ages 50 to 61 since the Great Recession. Older workers face severe financial conditions when they lose a job, because they are less likely than younger workers to be reemployed and lack various public supports during unemployment. However, little is known about older workers’ struggles to maintain economic well-being following job loss. Using the 2008 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, authors found that about 12% of older workers experienced unemployment and 40% suffered a bill-paying, health, housing, or food hardship within two years after the Great Recession. The results of logistic regression indicate that unemployment experience and recurrent unemployment were associated with increased risks of experiencing a bill-paying, health, or food hardship, whereas housing hardships were not associated with unemployment problems. The findings shed light on older workers’ age-specific vulnerability in the...

    This study examined the relationships between unemployment experience and recurrent unemployment and the four types of material hardships faced by older adults ages 50 to 61 since the Great Recession. Older workers face severe financial conditions when they lose a job, because they are less likely than younger workers to be reemployed and lack various public supports during unemployment. However, little is known about older workers’ struggles to maintain economic well-being following job loss. Using the 2008 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, authors found that about 12% of older workers experienced unemployment and 40% suffered a bill-paying, health, housing, or food hardship within two years after the Great Recession. The results of logistic regression indicate that unemployment experience and recurrent unemployment were associated with increased risks of experiencing a bill-paying, health, or food hardship, whereas housing hardships were not associated with unemployment problems. The findings shed light on older workers’ age-specific vulnerability in the U.S. labor market. Authors discuss social policy implications for improving their economic well-being during unemployment and recommend removal of reemployment barriers and strengthening of public supports for older workers. (Author abstract)

     

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