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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Blair, Kevin D.; Taylor, David B.; Rivera, Craig J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    This article presents the results from 77 interviews with kinship caregivers participating in the child-only component of the TANF program. The authors interviewed caregivers using the Strengths and Stressors Tracking Device (SSTD). Key findings include: most caregivers and their families possess significant strengths that can be used in a strengths-based approach to case management; environmental stress—an acknowledged ecological correlate with potential for abuse and neglect—is an area of strength; and permanency planning and long-term stability of the kinship care situation should be a major focus of social services and case managers. This research offers a valuable contribution to child welfare and kinship care literature because it provides evidence-based research to demonstrate the significant strengths in a caregiving population. (author abstract)

    This article presents the results from 77 interviews with kinship caregivers participating in the child-only component of the TANF program. The authors interviewed caregivers using the Strengths and Stressors Tracking Device (SSTD). Key findings include: most caregivers and their families possess significant strengths that can be used in a strengths-based approach to case management; environmental stress—an acknowledged ecological correlate with potential for abuse and neglect—is an area of strength; and permanency planning and long-term stability of the kinship care situation should be a major focus of social services and case managers. This research offers a valuable contribution to child welfare and kinship care literature because it provides evidence-based research to demonstrate the significant strengths in a caregiving population. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Marynak, Kristy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    This article examines child-only cases within the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which currently comprise 47 percent of the overall TANF caseload. Child-only cases exclude adults from the benefit calculation, providing aid only to children, and exempt adults from work requirements and time limits. This article reviews the narrow literature on child-only TANF populations, distinguishing between “non-parental” cases involving relative caregivers and “parental” cases involving parents who are ineligible for benefits because of sanctions, alien status, or SSI receipt. The article then discusses the inadequate communication and collaboration between TANF agencies and the child welfare system; describes unproven, though innovative, state efforts to assist child-only populations; and concludes with the recommendation that Congress should expand the 2011 President’s Budget request to include competitive grants for programs that address the child-only population’s needs and sponsor third-party studies to test the programs’ impacts on child outcomes. (author...

    This article examines child-only cases within the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which currently comprise 47 percent of the overall TANF caseload. Child-only cases exclude adults from the benefit calculation, providing aid only to children, and exempt adults from work requirements and time limits. This article reviews the narrow literature on child-only TANF populations, distinguishing between “non-parental” cases involving relative caregivers and “parental” cases involving parents who are ineligible for benefits because of sanctions, alien status, or SSI receipt. The article then discusses the inadequate communication and collaboration between TANF agencies and the child welfare system; describes unproven, though innovative, state efforts to assist child-only populations; and concludes with the recommendation that Congress should expand the 2011 President’s Budget request to include competitive grants for programs that address the child-only population’s needs and sponsor third-party studies to test the programs’ impacts on child outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bruce, Donald; Thacker, Angela; Shone, Bryan; Ullrich, Laura
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    While U.S. welfare programs have traditionally targeted single-parent households, the “child-only” caseload is large and growing. The Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County’s Office of Metropolitan Social Services contracted with the University of Tennessee’s Center for Business and Economic Research to conduct a study of this important but often-overlooked segment of the welfare caseload. MSS desires to learn more about child-only cases with non-parent caretakers in Davidson County, such that a menu of enhanced services can be developed for the broader population of kinship caregivers. Non-parental child-only cases involve situations in which children reside with family members other than their own parents or non-related legal guardians, most often grandparents, great-grandparents, aunts, or uncles. These cases, which comprise about 60 percent of Tennessee’s child-only caseload, are likely to have different needs than typical Families First assistance groups.

    Our study presents the first detailed statistical portrait of the current non-parent child-only...

    While U.S. welfare programs have traditionally targeted single-parent households, the “child-only” caseload is large and growing. The Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County’s Office of Metropolitan Social Services contracted with the University of Tennessee’s Center for Business and Economic Research to conduct a study of this important but often-overlooked segment of the welfare caseload. MSS desires to learn more about child-only cases with non-parent caretakers in Davidson County, such that a menu of enhanced services can be developed for the broader population of kinship caregivers. Non-parental child-only cases involve situations in which children reside with family members other than their own parents or non-related legal guardians, most often grandparents, great-grandparents, aunts, or uncles. These cases, which comprise about 60 percent of Tennessee’s child-only caseload, are likely to have different needs than typical Families First assistance groups.

    Our study presents the first detailed statistical portrait of the current non-parent child-only caseload in Davidson County. We supplement administrative data from monthly Families First records with a detailed survey of non-parent caretakers of child-only cases in Davidson County. Of the 10,277 child-only cases with non-parent caretakers in the state of Tennessee, 1,285 resided in Davidson County and 617 were surveyed for this report.

    We find that non-parent caretakers of child-only cases in Davidson County are quite different from statewide averages in several important ways. They are less likely to be married and less likely to be grandparents of the eligible children. They are younger, more likely to be Black, and less likely to be disabled or to receive SSI than state averages. They received slightly more in Food Stamps and other unearned income. They are less likely to own a vehicle and more likely to rent than own their current housing. They also face higher monthly payments for mortgages, property taxes, and utility bills. Results indicate that non-parent caretakers of child-only cases are generally better off than caretakers of non-child-only cases. That said, a significant percentage of our Davidson County survey sample report having one or more difficulties. The areas for the most immediate and cost-effective impact appear to be information and referral, case management, education, and training.

    (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: O'Dell, Kelley
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    During the past several years, policymakers and program administrators have paid more attention to child-only cases, which comprise a growing percentage of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) caseload.  While the number of child-only cases dropped between 1996 and 1998 from a peak of 978,000 families (22 percent of the caseload), the number and proportion have since increased. In fiscal 2001 there were about 786,900 child-only cases, accounting for 37.2 percent of the total TANF caseload. In addition, because the children and caregivers in child-only cases have some unique or particularly marked needs, there are questions and concerns about the well-being of these children and how best to serve them and their caregivers.

    To address the circumstances of child-only cases, some states have designed specific programs and policies for them, such as specialized case management and increased financial assistance. Other states are focusing on a holistic service approach and integrating the services of the welfare and child welfare systems. (author abstract)

    ...

    During the past several years, policymakers and program administrators have paid more attention to child-only cases, which comprise a growing percentage of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) caseload.  While the number of child-only cases dropped between 1996 and 1998 from a peak of 978,000 families (22 percent of the caseload), the number and proportion have since increased. In fiscal 2001 there were about 786,900 child-only cases, accounting for 37.2 percent of the total TANF caseload. In addition, because the children and caregivers in child-only cases have some unique or particularly marked needs, there are questions and concerns about the well-being of these children and how best to serve them and their caregivers.

    To address the circumstances of child-only cases, some states have designed specific programs and policies for them, such as specialized case management and increased financial assistance. Other states are focusing on a holistic service approach and integrating the services of the welfare and child welfare systems. (author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: Lieberman, Charles J.; Lindler, Vanessa; O’Brien-Strain, Margaret
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Child-only cases represent about 40 percent of California’s TANF caseload. In counties that have experienced especially high caseload reductions, such as San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties in the San Francisco Bay Area, child-only cases represent half or more of the total CalWORKs (California TANF program) caseload. The citizen children of undocumented parents make up as many as 40 percent of the child-only caseload. These families are very similar to aided adult families, in that there are needy parents in the household who are able to work but currently do not earn enough to support their families. Yet because the parents are barred from receiving assistance, these families rely on lower grants and are not able to access the services available to other families. This report explores the characteristics and well-being of such undocumented immigrant child-only cases in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Building on previous work on TANF leavers in these counties, The SPHERE Institute surveyed the parents of almost 800 citizen children who were currently and formerly aided on...

    Child-only cases represent about 40 percent of California’s TANF caseload. In counties that have experienced especially high caseload reductions, such as San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties in the San Francisco Bay Area, child-only cases represent half or more of the total CalWORKs (California TANF program) caseload. The citizen children of undocumented parents make up as many as 40 percent of the child-only caseload. These families are very similar to aided adult families, in that there are needy parents in the household who are able to work but currently do not earn enough to support their families. Yet because the parents are barred from receiving assistance, these families rely on lower grants and are not able to access the services available to other families. This report explores the characteristics and well-being of such undocumented immigrant child-only cases in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Building on previous work on TANF leavers in these counties, The SPHERE Institute surveyed the parents of almost 800 citizen children who were currently and formerly aided on child-only CalWORKs cases. Comparing these findings to results from an earlier study of aided-adult leavers (citizens or legal immigrants), we review the demographic characteristics, the employment status, the economic circumstances and other measures of well-being for both the child-only and aided-adult cases. Finally, we assess which characteristics appear to be associated with exiting the child-only caseload for these families. (author abstract)

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