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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Carnevale, Anthony P.; Jayasundera, Tamara; Hanson, Andrew R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Getting a Bachelor's degree is the best way for most workers to make middle-class wages. In this report, however, we show there are 29 million jobs (21% of all jobs) for workers without Bachelor's degrees. The report also details five major sub-baccalaureate, career and technical education (CTE) pathways: employer-based training, industry-based certifications, apprenticeships, postsecondary certificates, and associate's degrees. (author abstract)

    Getting a Bachelor's degree is the best way for most workers to make middle-class wages. In this report, however, we show there are 29 million jobs (21% of all jobs) for workers without Bachelor's degrees. The report also details five major sub-baccalaureate, career and technical education (CTE) pathways: employer-based training, industry-based certifications, apprenticeships, postsecondary certificates, and associate's degrees. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Jenkins, Davis; Zeidenberg, Matthew ; Kienzl, Gregory
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    The CCRC study compared the educational outcomes over a two-year tracking period of I-BEST students with those of other basic skills students. The study found that students participating in I-BEST achieved better educational outcomes than did other basic skills students, including those who enrolled in at least one non-I-BEST workforce course. I-BEST students were more likely than others to: Continue into credit-bearing coursework; Earn credits that count toward a college credential; Earn occupational certificates; and Make point gains on basic skills tests. On all the outcomes examined, I-BEST students did moderately or substantially better than non-I-BEST basic skills students in general. (author abstract)

    The CCRC study compared the educational outcomes over a two-year tracking period of I-BEST students with those of other basic skills students. The study found that students participating in I-BEST achieved better educational outcomes than did other basic skills students, including those who enrolled in at least one non-I-BEST workforce course. I-BEST students were more likely than others to: Continue into credit-bearing coursework; Earn credits that count toward a college credential; Earn occupational certificates; and Make point gains on basic skills tests. On all the outcomes examined, I-BEST students did moderately or substantially better than non-I-BEST basic skills students in general. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Grubb, W. Norton; Badway, Norena
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    This monograph describes the mandatory cooperative education program at LaGuardia Community College in New York City, and the series of seminars that integrate school-based and work-based learning. This series of studies examines the history, practice, and quality of cooperative education (CE) in two-year colleges in regions where career education is firmly ingrained and widespread. One study describes a mandatory cooperative education program and its series of seminars that integrate school-based and work-based learning to actively explore careers; to master skills and competencies common to all jobs; and to explore social, ethical, political, and moral themes associated with working. The second study found that benefits of CE cited by students, employers, and schools were allowing employers to screen and "grow their own" employees, giving students direct knowledge about the workplace and applications of school-based learning in the workplace; and strengthening schools' links to employers. A key finding is that work-based components must become central to educational purposes of...

    This monograph describes the mandatory cooperative education program at LaGuardia Community College in New York City, and the series of seminars that integrate school-based and work-based learning. This series of studies examines the history, practice, and quality of cooperative education (CE) in two-year colleges in regions where career education is firmly ingrained and widespread. One study describes a mandatory cooperative education program and its series of seminars that integrate school-based and work-based learning to actively explore careers; to master skills and competencies common to all jobs; and to explore social, ethical, political, and moral themes associated with working. The second study found that benefits of CE cited by students, employers, and schools were allowing employers to screen and "grow their own" employees, giving students direct knowledge about the workplace and applications of school-based learning in the workplace; and strengthening schools' links to employers. A key finding is that work-based components must become central to educational purposes of institutions so that it becomes as unthinkable to give them up, even in times of scarce resources. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dave, Dhaval M.; Reichman, Nancy E.; Corman, Hope; Das, Dhiman
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Exploiting variation in welfare reform across states and over time and using relevant comparison groups, this study estimates the effects of welfare reform on an important source of human capital acquisition among women at risk for relying on welfare: vocational education and training. The results indicate that welfare reform reduced enrollment in full-time vocational education and had no significant effects on part-time vocational education or participation in other types of work-related courses, though there is considerable heterogeneity across states with respect to the strictness of educational policy and the strength of work incentives under welfare reform. In addition, we find heterogeneous effects by prior educational attainment. We find no evidence that the previously-observed negative effects of welfare reform on formal education (including college enrollment), which we replicated in this study, have been offset by increases in vocational education and training. (author abstract)

    Exploiting variation in welfare reform across states and over time and using relevant comparison groups, this study estimates the effects of welfare reform on an important source of human capital acquisition among women at risk for relying on welfare: vocational education and training. The results indicate that welfare reform reduced enrollment in full-time vocational education and had no significant effects on part-time vocational education or participation in other types of work-related courses, though there is considerable heterogeneity across states with respect to the strictness of educational policy and the strength of work incentives under welfare reform. In addition, we find heterogeneous effects by prior educational attainment. We find no evidence that the previously-observed negative effects of welfare reform on formal education (including college enrollment), which we replicated in this study, have been offset by increases in vocational education and training. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Metis Associates
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The NYC Center for Economic Opportunity supports several workforce development programs that focus on health care careers including the Licensed Practical Nurse program, a Registered Nurse Training program, and a health care sector center that trains and places job seekers in a variety of health professions.

    The LPN Participant Feedback brief describes the qualitative assessment conducted by Metis Associates of the Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) program. Metis Associates gathered feedback from participants as they completed the program and from graduates more than a year after completing the program. CEO sought to learn more about whether participants felt adequately prepared by the program, suggestions for improvement, and how they fared in the workplace.

    In spring 2009, CEO requested that Westat and Metis provide a mid-term review of the four-year Nursing Career Ladder (Registered Nurse) RN Program, which was launched in 2007. The purposes of this review were to provide a clear understanding of the context in which the program was developed and operates; to...

    The NYC Center for Economic Opportunity supports several workforce development programs that focus on health care careers including the Licensed Practical Nurse program, a Registered Nurse Training program, and a health care sector center that trains and places job seekers in a variety of health professions.

    The LPN Participant Feedback brief describes the qualitative assessment conducted by Metis Associates of the Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) program. Metis Associates gathered feedback from participants as they completed the program and from graduates more than a year after completing the program. CEO sought to learn more about whether participants felt adequately prepared by the program, suggestions for improvement, and how they fared in the workplace.

    In spring 2009, CEO requested that Westat and Metis provide a mid-term review of the four-year Nursing Career Ladder (Registered Nurse) RN Program, which was launched in 2007. The purposes of this review were to provide a clear understanding of the context in which the program was developed and operates; to describe how the program is structured and implemented (represented visually by a logic model); to outline the costs associated with its implementation; to gather preliminary information regarding program outcomes; and to make recommendations about the program model, as well as further evaluation activities.

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