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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cancian, Maria; Cook, Steven T. ; Seki, Mai; Wimer, Lynn
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Most families in the child protective services system also interact with the child support enforcement system. This study exploits a natural experiment in Wisconsin, created by the state's large regional variation in child support referral policy, to estimate a potentially important effect of child support enforcement on the duration of out-of-home foster care placement. The effect we examine is whether requiring parents to pay support to offset the costs of foster care delays children's reunification with a parent or other permanent placement. We find evidence of this unintended effect, which is important not only because longer foster care spells are expensive for taxpayers, but also because extended placements in foster care may have consequences for child well-being. Our results highlight the potential importance of cross-systems analysis and the potential consequences when the policies and fundamental objectives of public systems are inconsistently coordinated. We discuss the implications of our findings for child support and child protective services policy. (Author...

    Most families in the child protective services system also interact with the child support enforcement system. This study exploits a natural experiment in Wisconsin, created by the state's large regional variation in child support referral policy, to estimate a potentially important effect of child support enforcement on the duration of out-of-home foster care placement. The effect we examine is whether requiring parents to pay support to offset the costs of foster care delays children's reunification with a parent or other permanent placement. We find evidence of this unintended effect, which is important not only because longer foster care spells are expensive for taxpayers, but also because extended placements in foster care may have consequences for child well-being. Our results highlight the potential importance of cross-systems analysis and the potential consequences when the policies and fundamental objectives of public systems are inconsistently coordinated. We discuss the implications of our findings for child support and child protective services policy. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Carlson, Deven; Haveman, Robert; Kaplan, Tom; Wolfe, Barbara
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This brief examines the five-year effects—a longer timespan than most studies—of Housing Choice vouchers on neighborhood quality, earnings, and work effort. Over time, residents moved to higher-quality neighborhoods, although the number of hours worked and income earned initially declined following a move. Both work and earnings, however, rebounded after five years. Racial minorities and younger adults tended to see better results than voucher recipients who were white or older, respectively. (author abstract) 

    This brief examines the five-year effects—a longer timespan than most studies—of Housing Choice vouchers on neighborhood quality, earnings, and work effort. Over time, residents moved to higher-quality neighborhoods, although the number of hours worked and income earned initially declined following a move. Both work and earnings, however, rebounded after five years. Racial minorities and younger adults tended to see better results than voucher recipients who were white or older, respectively. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Aizer, Anna; Eli, Shari; Ferrie, Joseph P.; Lleras-Muney, Adriana
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    We estimate the long-run impact of cash transfers to poor families on children's longevity, educational attainment, nutritional status, and income in adulthood. To do so, we collected individual-level administrative records of applicants to the Mothers' Pension program--the first government-sponsored welfare program in the US (1911-1935) --and matched them to census, WWII and death records. Male children of accepted applicants lived one year longer than those of rejected mothers. Male children of accepted mothers received one-third more years of schooling, were less likely to be underweight, and had higher income in adulthood than children of rejected mothers. (author abstract)

    We estimate the long-run impact of cash transfers to poor families on children's longevity, educational attainment, nutritional status, and income in adulthood. To do so, we collected individual-level administrative records of applicants to the Mothers' Pension program--the first government-sponsored welfare program in the US (1911-1935) --and matched them to census, WWII and death records. Male children of accepted applicants lived one year longer than those of rejected mothers. Male children of accepted mothers received one-third more years of schooling, were less likely to be underweight, and had higher income in adulthood than children of rejected mothers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Haveman, Robert
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Do housing vouchers work? The country’s Section 8 housing voucher program, which is designed to enable “very low-income families, the elderly, and the disabled to afford decent, safe, and sanitary housing in the private market,” currently serves more than 2.2 million households and more than 5 million individuals, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Although the housing voucher program has grown quickly and is in high demand (as evidenced by lengthy waiting lists), its effects haven’t been directly examined to the degree that one might imagine or want. The purpose of this article is to indicate the results of a comprehensive assessment of the country’s Section 8 housing voucher program. (author abstract) 

    Do housing vouchers work? The country’s Section 8 housing voucher program, which is designed to enable “very low-income families, the elderly, and the disabled to afford decent, safe, and sanitary housing in the private market,” currently serves more than 2.2 million households and more than 5 million individuals, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Although the housing voucher program has grown quickly and is in high demand (as evidenced by lengthy waiting lists), its effects haven’t been directly examined to the degree that one might imagine or want. The purpose of this article is to indicate the results of a comprehensive assessment of the country’s Section 8 housing voucher program. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Bir, Anupa; Lerman, Robert; Kofke-Egger, Heather; Nichols, Austin; Smith, Kevin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report is a technical supplement to The Community Healthy Marriage Initiative Evaluation: Impacts of a Community Approach to Strengthening Families. It provides additional detail about the research design and analytic methods that were used in the impact analyses and additional supplemental analyses that explore other aspects of the demonstration. (author abstract)

    This report is a technical supplement to The Community Healthy Marriage Initiative Evaluation: Impacts of a Community Approach to Strengthening Families. It provides additional detail about the research design and analytic methods that were used in the impact analyses and additional supplemental analyses that explore other aspects of the demonstration. (author abstract)

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