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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1935

    This statute provides Social Services Block Grants to each state and territory to meet the needs of its residents through locally relevant social services. The block grants support programs that allow communities to achieve or maintain economic self-sufficiency to prevent, reduce or eliminate dependency on social services.

    The publication date noted for this Title reflects the original date the Social Security Act was enacted and not subsequent amendments made to the Act.

     

    This statute provides Social Services Block Grants to each state and territory to meet the needs of its residents through locally relevant social services. The block grants support programs that allow communities to achieve or maintain economic self-sufficiency to prevent, reduce or eliminate dependency on social services.

    The publication date noted for this Title reflects the original date the Social Security Act was enacted and not subsequent amendments made to the Act.

     

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1935

    This statute allocates funds to States to develop and maintain child health assistance provisions for uninsured, low-income children.

    The publication date noted for this Title reflects the original date the Social Security Act was enacted and not subsequent amendments made to the Act.

     

    This statute allocates funds to States to develop and maintain child health assistance provisions for uninsured, low-income children.

    The publication date noted for this Title reflects the original date the Social Security Act was enacted and not subsequent amendments made to the Act.

     

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1946

    This statute was a permanent enabling law to assist states in their school lunch programs.

    Public Law No. 79-396 (1946). 

     

    This statute was a permanent enabling law to assist states in their school lunch programs.

    Public Law No. 79-396 (1946). 

     

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1964

    This statute established a number of programs to improve the self-sufficiency of the poor, including Job Corps and other work training programs, community action programs to fight poverty at a local level, adult basic education programs, and Vista, a youth community service program. It also created loan programs for farms and small businesses, and pilot work-experience programs.

    Public Law No. 88-452 (1964).

    This statute established a number of programs to improve the self-sufficiency of the poor, including Job Corps and other work training programs, community action programs to fight poverty at a local level, adult basic education programs, and Vista, a youth community service program. It also created loan programs for farms and small businesses, and pilot work-experience programs.

    Public Law No. 88-452 (1964).

  • Individual Author: Office of Policy Planning and Research, United States Department of Labor
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1965

    The most difficult fact for white Americans to understand is that in these terms the circumstances of the Negro American community in recent years has probably been getting worse, not better.

    Indices of dollars of income, standards of living, and years of education deceive. The gap between the Negro and most other groups in American society is widening.

    The fundamental problem, in which this is most clearly the case, is that of family structure. The evidence — not final, but powerfully persuasive — is that the Negro family in the urban ghettos is crumbling. A middle class group has managed to save itself, but for vast numbers of the unskilled, poorly educated city working class the fabric of conventional social relationships has all but disintegrated. There are indications that the situation may have been arrested in the past few years, but the general post war trend is unmistakable. So long as this situation persists, the cycle of poverty and disadvantage will continue to repeat itself.

    The thesis of this paper is that these events, in combination,...

    The most difficult fact for white Americans to understand is that in these terms the circumstances of the Negro American community in recent years has probably been getting worse, not better.

    Indices of dollars of income, standards of living, and years of education deceive. The gap between the Negro and most other groups in American society is widening.

    The fundamental problem, in which this is most clearly the case, is that of family structure. The evidence — not final, but powerfully persuasive — is that the Negro family in the urban ghettos is crumbling. A middle class group has managed to save itself, but for vast numbers of the unskilled, poorly educated city working class the fabric of conventional social relationships has all but disintegrated. There are indications that the situation may have been arrested in the past few years, but the general post war trend is unmistakable. So long as this situation persists, the cycle of poverty and disadvantage will continue to repeat itself.

    The thesis of this paper is that these events, in combination, confront the nation with a new kind of problem. Measures that have worked in the past, or would work for most groups in the present, will not work here. A national effort is required that will give a unity of purpose to the many activities of the Federal government in this area, directed to a new kind of national goal: the establishment of a stable Negro family structure. (author introduction)

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