Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Lindhorst, Taryn Patricia
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2001

    This dissertation is an empirical policy analysis which investigates the effect of domestic violence on a woman's welfare status, employment, and mental health within the context of new policies instituted by welfare reform. It uses quantitative data from a panel survey, and qualitative narratives from respondents who reported current domestic abuse.

    Multivariate analysis of welfare outcomes finds that domestic violence affects welfare outcomes indirectly through its effect on depression. Depression is associated with unemployment, continuing on TANF, and being sanctioned off welfare. Domestic violence is one of the strongest predictors of the level of reported depression. Abuse is not directly related to whether a woman is on TANF, leaves welfare voluntarily or has been sanctioned off the program. Further analysis shows that domestic violence is not statistically significant in predicting employment. This suggests that when domestic violence affects welfare status and employment it does so through its effect on mental health.

    Women's stories about abuse indicate...

    This dissertation is an empirical policy analysis which investigates the effect of domestic violence on a woman's welfare status, employment, and mental health within the context of new policies instituted by welfare reform. It uses quantitative data from a panel survey, and qualitative narratives from respondents who reported current domestic abuse.

    Multivariate analysis of welfare outcomes finds that domestic violence affects welfare outcomes indirectly through its effect on depression. Depression is associated with unemployment, continuing on TANF, and being sanctioned off welfare. Domestic violence is one of the strongest predictors of the level of reported depression. Abuse is not directly related to whether a woman is on TANF, leaves welfare voluntarily or has been sanctioned off the program. Further analysis shows that domestic violence is not statistically significant in predicting employment. This suggests that when domestic violence affects welfare status and employment it does so through its effect on mental health.

    Women's stories about abuse indicate that domestic violence is a serious life threatening problem. Even though the state has adopted the Family Violence Option to assist women who are experiencing abuse, none of the ten women interviewed received help through this program. Reasons for the failure of this policy to provide meaningful help include the lack of knowledge women have about the policy; their unwillingness to disclose the abuse, and the inability of the system to take meaningful action on their behalf.

    None of the women in the qualitative sample were employed during the worst of the abuse. The qualitative findings suggest that the window during which violence affects employment may be relatively short for most women--a statistical effect may only be noticeable if women are surveyed during the period surrounding the end of the relationship. Narratives show that domestic violence has immediate consequences that affect employment through interaction with the criminal justice system, increased isolation, lack of stable housing, need for closer supervision of children who have also been traumatized by the abuse, and ongoing health and mental health concerns. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Welsch, Heidi S.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2006

    This dissertation examined how social outcomes relate to the geographic patterns of economic segregation in metropolitan statistical areas of the United States. The design of this project involved collection and analysis of geographic and demographic data across a sample of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA's). U.S. Census data were used to analyze the spatial relationships between areas with a concentration of households in poverty and areas with a concentration of households with high-incomes. Data on nine widely accepted indicators of social well-being were collected at a county and MSA level from a variety of sources and statistically analyzed for patterns that correlate with geographic attributes.

    The study found that the geographic attributes of areas of poverty and areas of high-income showed limited significant correlation measures with each other. However, many measures of social well-being correlated in statistically significant ways based on geographic attributes of concentrations of poverty and high-income. This was true for all three types of geographic...

    This dissertation examined how social outcomes relate to the geographic patterns of economic segregation in metropolitan statistical areas of the United States. The design of this project involved collection and analysis of geographic and demographic data across a sample of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA's). U.S. Census data were used to analyze the spatial relationships between areas with a concentration of households in poverty and areas with a concentration of households with high-incomes. Data on nine widely accepted indicators of social well-being were collected at a county and MSA level from a variety of sources and statistically analyzed for patterns that correlate with geographic attributes.

    The study found that the geographic attributes of areas of poverty and areas of high-income showed limited significant correlation measures with each other. However, many measures of social well-being correlated in statistically significant ways based on geographic attributes of concentrations of poverty and high-income. This was true for all three types of geographic attributes that were tested--proportion (or relative quantity), distance, and concentration magnitude.

    The study concludes that issues of concentrated poverty must be seen in a metropolitan or regional context. Solutions to concentrated poverty must look further than the people and places of poverty. Furthermore, the study has suggested that it is not just the proportion or location of concentrated poverty that affects social outcomes. The spatial and geographic relationships between and among different segments of society correlated to social outcomes for the entire community. Finally, a brief examination of existing policies and programs aimed at reducing poverty were examined to suggest how the findings of this study might be taken into account in the future. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Stevenson, Andre’ P.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2007

    This article examines a sample of young, unmarried mothers from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and considers how different types of economic support received soon after their first child is born contributes to the later self-sufficiency of young, unmarried mothers. It expands conventional categories of income support—AFDC, food stamps, child support—to include shared housing and relatives' assistance. The model also contains various behaviors of young mothers after the birth of their first child. The findings suggest that certain economic supports assist these mothers and that life choices they make after their child's birth are important to self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

    This article examines a sample of young, unmarried mothers from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and considers how different types of economic support received soon after their first child is born contributes to the later self-sufficiency of young, unmarried mothers. It expands conventional categories of income support—AFDC, food stamps, child support—to include shared housing and relatives' assistance. The model also contains various behaviors of young mothers after the birth of their first child. The findings suggest that certain economic supports assist these mothers and that life choices they make after their child's birth are important to self-sufficiency. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Granruth, Laura Brierton
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2009

    The nexus between the level of state tax code progressivity and the well-being of state residents has not been well explored. This research study examines the impact of the level of state tax code progressivity on selected children's educational, health and poverty outcomes using a Keynesian theoretical framework. The changing political framework that devolved an increasing number of social policies and programs to the state level during the past quarter century has affected state governments and has threatened the fiscal capacity of states to raise adequate revenue. In light of increasing state funding responsibilities, it is imperative to understand state tax policy and its capacity to perform adequately and fairly in meeting state residents needs, and in particular, the needs of their most vulnerable residents, including children.

    The study utilizes a research design based on a secondary data analysis of archival data and created a new data set with the state as the unit of analysis. The data set was created through the combination of multiple publicly available data...

    The nexus between the level of state tax code progressivity and the well-being of state residents has not been well explored. This research study examines the impact of the level of state tax code progressivity on selected children's educational, health and poverty outcomes using a Keynesian theoretical framework. The changing political framework that devolved an increasing number of social policies and programs to the state level during the past quarter century has affected state governments and has threatened the fiscal capacity of states to raise adequate revenue. In light of increasing state funding responsibilities, it is imperative to understand state tax policy and its capacity to perform adequately and fairly in meeting state residents needs, and in particular, the needs of their most vulnerable residents, including children.

    The study utilizes a research design based on a secondary data analysis of archival data and created a new data set with the state as the unit of analysis. The data set was created through the combination of multiple publicly available data sources. The research project explores the primary question of "Do states with more progressive tax codes have better educational, health and poverty outcomes for children than states with more regressive tax codes?" through one major hypothesis: Controlling for state characteristics, the greater the level of the state tax code progressivity the better the educational, health and poverty outcomes achieved by children residing in those states.

    The findings show that the level of state tax code progressivity is a factor in the well being of children. Multiple regression analyses found that the level of state tax code progressivity is a predictor for state child and infant mortality rates. Significant interactions also were found for fourth and eighth grade academic proficiency by level of state tax code progressivity and state population size, and for child mortality rate by level of state tax code progressivity and median household income. The findings suggest that tax policy is an important component of social welfare policy and should receive greater attention from the social work profession.  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Van Buren, John
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2014

    Urban gardening has become a very popular trend in the last few years in both affluent neighborhoods as a form of relaxation and in impoverished areas as a form of hunger relief. In impoverished areas, urban gardens are usually exclusively advertised as a solution to limited food access; however, there is a naive belief that these gardens are effective forms of mass food production. Presently, these gardens are not productive enough to globally effect food production and the environment. However, to the communities surrounding the gardens, the effects are immense. Urban gardens are cheap and effective solutions for many of the problems associated with poverty and food deserts. Some of the issues I will address are: obesity, education, social interactions, income supplementation, health issues, dangerous neighborhoods, and refugee assimilation.

    The overall approach will be based on public health and the health of the community. I will address the physical and psychological effects of urban gardens, but I will also touch upon the effects on the ecology and psychology of the...

    Urban gardening has become a very popular trend in the last few years in both affluent neighborhoods as a form of relaxation and in impoverished areas as a form of hunger relief. In impoverished areas, urban gardens are usually exclusively advertised as a solution to limited food access; however, there is a naive belief that these gardens are effective forms of mass food production. Presently, these gardens are not productive enough to globally effect food production and the environment. However, to the communities surrounding the gardens, the effects are immense. Urban gardens are cheap and effective solutions for many of the problems associated with poverty and food deserts. Some of the issues I will address are: obesity, education, social interactions, income supplementation, health issues, dangerous neighborhoods, and refugee assimilation.

    The overall approach will be based on public health and the health of the community. I will address the physical and psychological effects of urban gardens, but I will also touch upon the effects on the ecology and psychology of the neighborhood, urban and suburban planning and its accompanying laws, environmental psychology, and environmental education. I will initially detail some of the consequences associated with living in an impoverished area. I will use the various research and case studies performed, as well as some of my own observations working in these areas. I will then compile the individual research of various solutions to food deserts and assemble them into an analysis of the overall beneficial effects of urban gardens. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Year

Year ranges from 2001 to 2015

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations