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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1935

    This statute established the U.S. Social Security system.  It provided benefits to the disabled and unemployed and included titles relating to social supports for the elderly, the blind, women and children, as well as established the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. 

    This statute established the U.S. Social Security system.  It provided benefits to the disabled and unemployed and included titles relating to social supports for the elderly, the blind, women and children, as well as established the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. 

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1935

    This statute provides Social Services Block Grants to each state and territory to meet the needs of its residents through locally relevant social services. The block grants support programs that allow communities to achieve or maintain economic self-sufficiency to prevent, reduce or eliminate dependency on social services.

    The publication date noted for this Title reflects the original date the Social Security Act was enacted and not subsequent amendments made to the Act.

     

    This statute provides Social Services Block Grants to each state and territory to meet the needs of its residents through locally relevant social services. The block grants support programs that allow communities to achieve or maintain economic self-sufficiency to prevent, reduce or eliminate dependency on social services.

    The publication date noted for this Title reflects the original date the Social Security Act was enacted and not subsequent amendments made to the Act.

     

  • Individual Author: Gilderbloom, John ; Rosentraub, Mark
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1990

    Programs and proposals for socially integrating disabled and elderly people have, traditionally, not received a great deal of support. To a limited extent this is changing. A number of social and political factors produced a unique task force in the Houston area which sought to capitalize on the depressed state of real estate and develop independent living situations for disabled people. A study detailed the extent to which large urban areas like Houston become "invisible jails" for the handicapped. The elders and the disabled are often trapped in restrictive living units and are unable to gain access to a city's resources by transportation systems not adapted for them. Several opportunities for creating a barrier free environment were found in an over-built residential sector. The responsibilities of urban areas for providing opportunities for all residents are considered. (author abstract)

    Programs and proposals for socially integrating disabled and elderly people have, traditionally, not received a great deal of support. To a limited extent this is changing. A number of social and political factors produced a unique task force in the Houston area which sought to capitalize on the depressed state of real estate and develop independent living situations for disabled people. A study detailed the extent to which large urban areas like Houston become "invisible jails" for the handicapped. The elders and the disabled are often trapped in restrictive living units and are unable to gain access to a city's resources by transportation systems not adapted for them. Several opportunities for creating a barrier free environment were found in an over-built residential sector. The responsibilities of urban areas for providing opportunities for all residents are considered. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rittner, Barbara; Kirk, Alan B.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1995

    This study presents survey data on low-income elderly people who attended daytime meal programs. The survey examined sociocultural and quality of life variables as they affected use of health care and transportation services. Most of the respondents self-reported their health status as poor or very poor, and more than half had no medical care during the preceding six months despite the presence of multiple physical symptoms. Social isolation from family or neighborhood support systems exacerbated problems with transportation, and most of the elderly people relied on public transportation to gain access to health services. Public transportation services posed additional barriers to health care use, among them fear.  (author abstract)

    This study presents survey data on low-income elderly people who attended daytime meal programs. The survey examined sociocultural and quality of life variables as they affected use of health care and transportation services. Most of the respondents self-reported their health status as poor or very poor, and more than half had no medical care during the preceding six months despite the presence of multiple physical symptoms. Social isolation from family or neighborhood support systems exacerbated problems with transportation, and most of the elderly people relied on public transportation to gain access to health services. Public transportation services posed additional barriers to health care use, among them fear.  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Betson, David M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1997

    Conventional wisdom in poverty research states that children are at greater risk of being poor than are the elderly. In 1993, the Census Bureau reported that the poverty rate for children was 22.7 percent while the poverty rate for the elderly was 12.2 percent. But is conventional wisdom correct? Or has how we measure poverty biased our thinking?

    In a recently published report, Measuring Poverty: A New Approach, the National Academy of Science's Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance reports estimates of how recommended changes in poverty measurement methodology would affect our concept of who is poor in the U.S. If the Panel's recommendations were adopted, the Panel estimated that individuals in poverty would be more likely to be working; poor children would more likely to be living in families where both parents reside; and poor individuals would be less likely to be receiving cash or in-kind benefits from the government. But equally important, the number of children and elderly poor would remain roughly the same. Conventional wisdom about the incidence of poverty by age...

    Conventional wisdom in poverty research states that children are at greater risk of being poor than are the elderly. In 1993, the Census Bureau reported that the poverty rate for children was 22.7 percent while the poverty rate for the elderly was 12.2 percent. But is conventional wisdom correct? Or has how we measure poverty biased our thinking?

    In a recently published report, Measuring Poverty: A New Approach, the National Academy of Science's Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance reports estimates of how recommended changes in poverty measurement methodology would affect our concept of who is poor in the U.S. If the Panel's recommendations were adopted, the Panel estimated that individuals in poverty would be more likely to be working; poor children would more likely to be living in families where both parents reside; and poor individuals would be less likely to be receiving cash or in-kind benefits from the government. But equally important, the number of children and elderly poor would remain roughly the same. Conventional wisdom about the incidence of poverty by age was upheld.

    Recently, the Urban Institute has produced estimates of the poverty population that would challenge this view. They have begun work which examines the impact on the composition of the poverty population resulting from the implementation of a subset of the Panel's recommendations aimed at creating internal consistency on the resource side of the poverty definition: (1) adding the value of in-kind food and housing benefits; (2) subtracting federal and state income taxes as well as counting the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); and (3) subtracting the medical out-of-pocket (MOOP) expenditures from the current definition of census money income. Utilizing the 1994 March CPS which was corrected for underreporting of government benefits, the Urban Institute has estimated that the poverty rate for children is significantly overstated while that of the elderly is vastly understated. In 1993, the Urban Institute estimates that using the official Census poverty definition but correcting for underreporting of income, the poverty rate for children would be 22.3 percent, while for the elderly it would be 11.9 percent. But if the above three Panel recommendations were implemented, the poverty rate for children would fall to 16.7 percent; at the same time the poverty rate for the elderly would rise to 19.8 percent. Conventional wisdom is stood on its head.

    The questions that this paper raises are twofold. First, why didn't the Panel report such a shift in relative poverty rates? Second and more importantly, has conventional wisdom been overturned? (author introduction)

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