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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2017

    This document provides detailed summaries of each family self-sufficiency research project that was active or newly funded during FY17, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select findings released in 2017.

    The studies in this report are organized into five sections:

    • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
    • Employment and the Labor Market
    • Education and Training
    • Behavioral Science
    • Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

     

    This document provides detailed summaries of each family self-sufficiency research project that was active or newly funded during FY17, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select findings released in 2017.

    The studies in this report are organized into five sections:

    • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
    • Employment and the Labor Market
    • Education and Training
    • Behavioral Science
    • Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Mattingly, Beth; Hartley, Robert Paul; Wimer, Christopher T.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Working families with young children face substantial barriers in accessing and affording quality child care. Among working families with a child under age 3, those who do not pay for child care are more likely to live in poor or low-income families than those who do pay for child care (61 percent versus 45 percent). These income differences suggest that cost may be an obstacle to greater labor force attachment or desired care arrangements among those who currently do not pay for care. Given the burden of high child care costs, along with the recent national attention paid to child care, it is worth thinking about policies that would help make child care more affordable. For example, simply making the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit refundable could lower barriers to work for poor families with young children, and expanding this credit could improve access to paid child care. (Author abstract) 

    Working families with young children face substantial barriers in accessing and affording quality child care. Among working families with a child under age 3, those who do not pay for child care are more likely to live in poor or low-income families than those who do pay for child care (61 percent versus 45 percent). These income differences suggest that cost may be an obstacle to greater labor force attachment or desired care arrangements among those who currently do not pay for care. Given the burden of high child care costs, along with the recent national attention paid to child care, it is worth thinking about policies that would help make child care more affordable. For example, simply making the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit refundable could lower barriers to work for poor families with young children, and expanding this credit could improve access to paid child care. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Wiseman, Michael
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2017

    Transformation of the Food Stamp Program (FSP) into a near-universal system of food-oriented income support renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was arguably the most significant development in American social policy during the first decade of the new millennium. Three events were the primary drivers of the change: (1) contraction of traditional welfare assistance that followed the 1996 transformation of Aid to Families with Dependent Children into Temporary Assistance for Needy Families; (2) progressive relaxation of federal eligibility requirements for food stamp receipt beginning in 2000; and (3) demand for help generated by the Great Recession (GR) of 2007 to 2009. Even with this metamorphosis, SNAP is only one component of the U.S. "safety net," and attention to the program's interface with other safety net components is essential to overall evaluation and planning for improvement. Material from this paper will appear as chapter 3 in The Middle-Class Safety Net in the Great Recession: Unemployment Insurance and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance...

    Transformation of the Food Stamp Program (FSP) into a near-universal system of food-oriented income support renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was arguably the most significant development in American social policy during the first decade of the new millennium. Three events were the primary drivers of the change: (1) contraction of traditional welfare assistance that followed the 1996 transformation of Aid to Families with Dependent Children into Temporary Assistance for Needy Families; (2) progressive relaxation of federal eligibility requirements for food stamp receipt beginning in 2000; and (3) demand for help generated by the Great Recession (GR) of 2007 to 2009. Even with this metamorphosis, SNAP is only one component of the U.S. "safety net," and attention to the program's interface with other safety net components is essential to overall evaluation and planning for improvement. Material from this paper will appear as chapter 3 in The Middle-Class Safety Net in the Great Recession: Unemployment Insurance and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Working Together, to be published by the W. E. Upjohn Institute in 2018. The book's object is to use the GR experience to inform both Unemployment Insurance (UI) and SNAP policy development in the future. The intent of this chapter is to provide a comprehensive overview of the SNAP program as operated through the GR that explains structure, reviews consequences, and lays part of the foundation for the book's state-specific analyses and its conclusions. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Eyster, Lauren; Nightingale, Demetra Smith
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    After years of continuing resolutions, Congress replaced the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) with the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA). WIOA continues WIA’s emphasis on universal services for both job seekers and employers, but includes provisions intended to improve the workforce development system overall. As state and local agencies and workforce boards implement changes introduced with WIOA, they must consider how they will serve customers with barriers to employment and improve current practices. This brief examines how services for low-income adults and youth may evolve under the new law, given experiences under WIA. (Author abstract)

    After years of continuing resolutions, Congress replaced the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) with the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA). WIOA continues WIA’s emphasis on universal services for both job seekers and employers, but includes provisions intended to improve the workforce development system overall. As state and local agencies and workforce boards implement changes introduced with WIOA, they must consider how they will serve customers with barriers to employment and improve current practices. This brief examines how services for low-income adults and youth may evolve under the new law, given experiences under WIA. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Modicamore, Dominic; Lamb, Yvette; Taylor, Jeffrey; Takyi-Laryea, Ama; Karageorge, Kathy; Ferroggiaro, Enzo
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report summarizes the implementation and evaluation of the Accelerating Connections to Employment (ACE) program. The ACE program model is designed to improve employment and employment-related outcomes for low-skilled workers through formal partnerships between Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs) and community colleges. Implemented at nine sites across four states (Maryland, Texas, Connecticut and Georgia) from 2012 to 2015, ACE provided training, support services, job readiness and job placement support to 1,258 participants. The ACE program is defined by five core activities: 1) a program planning stage, consisting of a program selection process informed by local labor market information, 2) intake and eligibility testing, consisting of program orientation and suitability assessments, 3) training, incorporating elements of the I-BEST model to provide integrated basic and vocational skills instruction, 4) support services, including academic and transportation support, and 5) transition and tracking, including job readiness and placement services. The final report describes...

    This report summarizes the implementation and evaluation of the Accelerating Connections to Employment (ACE) program. The ACE program model is designed to improve employment and employment-related outcomes for low-skilled workers through formal partnerships between Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs) and community colleges. Implemented at nine sites across four states (Maryland, Texas, Connecticut and Georgia) from 2012 to 2015, ACE provided training, support services, job readiness and job placement support to 1,258 participants. The ACE program is defined by five core activities: 1) a program planning stage, consisting of a program selection process informed by local labor market information, 2) intake and eligibility testing, consisting of program orientation and suitability assessments, 3) training, incorporating elements of the I-BEST model to provide integrated basic and vocational skills instruction, 4) support services, including academic and transportation support, and 5) transition and tracking, including job readiness and placement services. The final report describes these components and their implementation in detail, highlighting challenges encountered and lessons learned. Quantitative results from the randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation of ACE are presented, as well as the results of a cost study describing the costs associated with implementing the ACE model.

    The research draws on quantitative data collected from state unemployment insurance (UI) records, a one-year and two-year multi-modal follow-up survey and intake and tracking data collected by ACE staff. Additional qualitative information, used to inform the implementation study, are drawn from annual site visit interviews, focus groups and classroom observations, as well as open-ended survey questions included in each of the follow-up surveys.

    The quantitative results of the RCT evaluation show that ACE has a significant positive impact on employment rates and earnings for ACE participants at all but one of the ACE sites, as well as positive and significant impacts on credential attainment. The implementation study and fidelity assessment indicate that each of the ACE sites followed the program model, although the implementation of the ACE model evolved as sites identified new staffing and service needs. Specifically, sites adapted to unanticipated challenges by adding new staff positions and adapting program procedures to better serve participants. (Author abstract)

     

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