Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Mabli, James; Cheban, Irina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance benefits to low-income people in an effort to reduce hunger and improve health and well-being. It is also a critical work support for many people. Policymakers recently have sought to strengthen the program participants’ pathways toward self-sufficiency, including considering existing and new work requirements for participants and improving and expanding the SNAP Employment and Training program that assists unemployed and underemployed participants in job search, job skills training, education, and work experience and training. However, relatively little is known about the labor force participation and employment decisions of SNAP participants, job characteristics among employed participants, and barriers to work among participants who are unemployed or out of the labor force (referred to as non-employed). This report helps to fill this gap by using the most recently available national longitudinal survey data to examine the employment experiences of SNAP participants. (Author abstract)

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance benefits to low-income people in an effort to reduce hunger and improve health and well-being. It is also a critical work support for many people. Policymakers recently have sought to strengthen the program participants’ pathways toward self-sufficiency, including considering existing and new work requirements for participants and improving and expanding the SNAP Employment and Training program that assists unemployed and underemployed participants in job search, job skills training, education, and work experience and training. However, relatively little is known about the labor force participation and employment decisions of SNAP participants, job characteristics among employed participants, and barriers to work among participants who are unemployed or out of the labor force (referred to as non-employed). This report helps to fill this gap by using the most recently available national longitudinal survey data to examine the employment experiences of SNAP participants. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mikelson, Kelly S.; Eyster, Lauren ; Durham, Christin; Cohen, Elissa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program is a $2 billion federal workforce investment aimed at helping community colleges across the nation increase their capacity to provide education and training programs for in-demand jobs. This brief is one of four briefs from the national evaluation of the TAACCCT grants produced by The Urban Institute under contract to the US Department of Labor. The four briefs discuss 1) TAACCCT grant goals, design, and evaluation; 2) TAACCCT grantee characteristics; 3) TAACCCT grant approaches, industries, and partnerships; and 4) early results from the TAACCCT grants. (Author abstract)

     

    The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program is a $2 billion federal workforce investment aimed at helping community colleges across the nation increase their capacity to provide education and training programs for in-demand jobs. This brief is one of four briefs from the national evaluation of the TAACCCT grants produced by The Urban Institute under contract to the US Department of Labor. The four briefs discuss 1) TAACCCT grant goals, design, and evaluation; 2) TAACCCT grantee characteristics; 3) TAACCCT grant approaches, industries, and partnerships; and 4) early results from the TAACCCT grants. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Eyster, Lauren; Cohen, Elissa ; Mikelson, Kelly S.; Durham, Christin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program is a $2 billion federal workforce investment aimed at helping community colleges across the nation increase their capacity to provide education and training programs for in-demand jobs. This brief is one of four briefs from the national evaluation of the TAACCCT grants produced by The Urban Institute under contract to the US Department of Labor. The four briefs discuss 1) TAACCCT grant goals, design, and evaluation; 2) TAACCCT grantee characteristics; 3) TAACCCT grant approaches, industries, and partnerships; and 4) early results from the TAACCCT grants. (Author abstract)

     

    The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program is a $2 billion federal workforce investment aimed at helping community colleges across the nation increase their capacity to provide education and training programs for in-demand jobs. This brief is one of four briefs from the national evaluation of the TAACCCT grants produced by The Urban Institute under contract to the US Department of Labor. The four briefs discuss 1) TAACCCT grant goals, design, and evaluation; 2) TAACCCT grantee characteristics; 3) TAACCCT grant approaches, industries, and partnerships; and 4) early results from the TAACCCT grants. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Gutierrez, Florencia; Speer, Laura; Boughamer, Beau; Fox, Ryan; Hamilton, Lisa; Hodgins, John; Laracy, Michael; West, Norris; Cauthen, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. In this year’s report, New Hampshire ranked first among states for overall child well-being, moving up one from 2016. Massachusetts and Vermont filled out the top three. Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi were the three lowest-ranked states. (Author abstract)

    The 2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book urges policymakers not to back away from targeted investments that help U.S. children become healthier, more likely to complete high school and better positioned to contribute to the nation’s economy as adults. The Data Book also shows the child poverty rate in 2015 continued to drop, landing at 21%. In addition, children experienced gains in reading proficiency and a significant increase in the number of kids with health insurance. However, the data indicate that unacceptable levels of children living in poverty and in high-poverty neighborhoods persist. In this year’s report, New Hampshire ranked first among states for overall child well-being, moving up one from 2016. Massachusetts and Vermont filled out the top three. Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi were the three lowest-ranked states. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kuhn, Sandra
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Although the prevalence and destruction of opioid addiction have touched individuals and families across all social groups and geographies, until recently, federal and state-level efforts to confront this growing problem have lacked focus and rigor. With several legislative actions already underway and the recent enactment of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), we will continue to see a focus on program development and treatment strategies. Employers can contribute toward curbing the opioid addiction epidemic in a number of ways and should play an instrumental role in facilitating increased awareness of and access to needed programming. These efforts will improve quality of life for employees and their dependents, as well as have a positive impact on productivity (including reduced absenteeism and decreased presenteeism). This article will explore the size and prevalence of the opioid epidemic, reflect on its implications for employers--including public policy initiatives--and suggest specific strategies for employer interventions. (Author abstract)

    Although the prevalence and destruction of opioid addiction have touched individuals and families across all social groups and geographies, until recently, federal and state-level efforts to confront this growing problem have lacked focus and rigor. With several legislative actions already underway and the recent enactment of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), we will continue to see a focus on program development and treatment strategies. Employers can contribute toward curbing the opioid addiction epidemic in a number of ways and should play an instrumental role in facilitating increased awareness of and access to needed programming. These efforts will improve quality of life for employees and their dependents, as well as have a positive impact on productivity (including reduced absenteeism and decreased presenteeism). This article will explore the size and prevalence of the opioid epidemic, reflect on its implications for employers--including public policy initiatives--and suggest specific strategies for employer interventions. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1935 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations