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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Mead, Lawrence
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1992

    Thirty years ago, the great national debate was how to help ordinary, workaday Americans achieve the good things in life. Today, we are preoccupied with—and increasingly divided over—how to cope with the problems of poor and dependent Americans, most of whom cannot or will not work at the jobs available. Mead provides overwhelming and disturbing evidence that passive poverty—the failure of most of the poor to work at all—reflects defeatism more than lack of opportunity. In this controversial book, Mead proposes concrete steps to overcome the inertia of the nonworking poor trapped in the welfare system. If the poor return to work, he suggests, American politics would focus once again on the problems of the working Americans. (publisher abstract)

    Thirty years ago, the great national debate was how to help ordinary, workaday Americans achieve the good things in life. Today, we are preoccupied with—and increasingly divided over—how to cope with the problems of poor and dependent Americans, most of whom cannot or will not work at the jobs available. Mead provides overwhelming and disturbing evidence that passive poverty—the failure of most of the poor to work at all—reflects defeatism more than lack of opportunity. In this controversial book, Mead proposes concrete steps to overcome the inertia of the nonworking poor trapped in the welfare system. If the poor return to work, he suggests, American politics would focus once again on the problems of the working Americans. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: Berger, Mark C.; Black, Dan A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1992

    We examine the effects of child care subsidies on the labor supply decisions of low-income mothers and on the quality of care their children receive using newly gathered data on two programs that subsidize the child care expenditures of families in Kentucky. We find that single mothers who receive child care subsidies are more likely to be employed and are generally more satisfied with the care their children receive, but subsidies have little effect on hours worked. (Author abstract)

    We examine the effects of child care subsidies on the labor supply decisions of low-income mothers and on the quality of care their children receive using newly gathered data on two programs that subsidize the child care expenditures of families in Kentucky. We find that single mothers who receive child care subsidies are more likely to be employed and are generally more satisfied with the care their children receive, but subsidies have little effect on hours worked. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1993

    The statute entitled eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave.

    Public Law No. 103-3 (1993).

    The statute entitled eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave.

    Public Law No. 103-3 (1993).

  • Individual Author: Fein, David J. ; Beecroft, Erik; Blomquist, John D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1994

    As in the current debate over the direction of national welfare reform, much of the inspiration for the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) -- the last major reform -- was provided by a series of state demonstrations operating under federal waiver authority. Ohio’s Transitions to Independence Demonstration was one of the most comprehensive of the pre-1988 FSA waiver initiatives authorized by the Reagan Administration’s Low Income Advisory Board. Transitions to Independence consisted of three separate interventions, each directed to the needs of a different subpopulation of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) is known in Ohio. (author abstract)

    As in the current debate over the direction of national welfare reform, much of the inspiration for the 1988 Family Support Act (FSA) -- the last major reform -- was provided by a series of state demonstrations operating under federal waiver authority. Ohio’s Transitions to Independence Demonstration was one of the most comprehensive of the pre-1988 FSA waiver initiatives authorized by the Reagan Administration’s Low Income Advisory Board. Transitions to Independence consisted of three separate interventions, each directed to the needs of a different subpopulation of recipients of Aid to Dependent Children (ADC), as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) is known in Ohio. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Burkhauser, Richard V.; Couch, Kenneth A.; Glenn, Andrew J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1995

    This paper documents the declining relationship between low hourly wages and low household income over the last half-century and how this has reduced the share of minimum wage workers who live in poor households. It then compares recent and prospective increases in the earned income tax credit (EITC) and the minimum wage as methods of increasing the labor earnings of poor workers. Data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) are used to simulate the effects of both programs. Increases in the EITC between 1989 and 1992 delivered a much larger proportion of a given dollar of benefits to the poor than did increases in the minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.25. Scheduled increases in the EITC through 1996 will also do far more for the working poor than raising the minimum wage. (author abstract)

    This paper documents the declining relationship between low hourly wages and low household income over the last half-century and how this has reduced the share of minimum wage workers who live in poor households. It then compares recent and prospective increases in the earned income tax credit (EITC) and the minimum wage as methods of increasing the labor earnings of poor workers. Data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) are used to simulate the effects of both programs. Increases in the EITC between 1989 and 1992 delivered a much larger proportion of a given dollar of benefits to the poor than did increases in the minimum wage from $3.35 to $4.25. Scheduled increases in the EITC through 1996 will also do far more for the working poor than raising the minimum wage. (author abstract)

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