Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This portfolio of research describes all of the active or newly funded projects of our Division of Economic Independence in fiscal year 2016. The report covers five different topic areas, showing the breadth of our family self-sufficiency research.

    These topic areas include:

    •Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

    •Employment and the Labor Market

    •Education and Training

    •Behavioral Science

    •Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    This document provides detailed summaries of each project that was active during FY16, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select research findings released in 2016. The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

    This portfolio of research describes all of the active or newly funded projects of our Division of Economic Independence in fiscal year 2016. The report covers five different topic areas, showing the breadth of our family self-sufficiency research.

    These topic areas include:

    •Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

    •Employment and the Labor Market

    •Education and Training

    •Behavioral Science

    •Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    This document provides detailed summaries of each project that was active during FY16, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select research findings released in 2016. The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Patel, Falguni
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop describes a study investigating the impact of a trauma-informed service that matches savings for low-income TANF receipents and offers programming that includes topics such as financial goal-setting.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop describes a study investigating the impact of a trauma-informed service that matches savings for low-income TANF receipents and offers programming that includes topics such as financial goal-setting.

  • Individual Author: Sama-Miller, Emily; Ross, Christine; Eckrich Sommer, Teresa; Baumgartner, Scott; Roberts, Lily; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Exploration of Integrated Approaches to Supporting Child Development and Improving Family Economic Security project investigated the design and evaluability of approaches to alleviating poverty that address the needs of low-income parents and children. The project examined programs that deliberately combine services that are intended to support both child development and parental economic security. Recent advances in implementation science and other fields of research provide key insights for new programs that may prove more effective than similar programs designed in the 1980s and 1990s. The project was funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and was conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and Northwestern University. (Author introduction)

    The Exploration of Integrated Approaches to Supporting Child Development and Improving Family Economic Security project investigated the design and evaluability of approaches to alleviating poverty that address the needs of low-income parents and children. The project examined programs that deliberately combine services that are intended to support both child development and parental economic security. Recent advances in implementation science and other fields of research provide key insights for new programs that may prove more effective than similar programs designed in the 1980s and 1990s. The project was funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and was conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and Northwestern University. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Gall, Anamita; Wright, Nicole
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program funds demonstration projects that provide training and education to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) is evaluating the HPOG Program using a multipronged strategy to examine program implementation, systems change, and outcomes and impacts for participants.

    The HPOG University Partnership Research Grants (HPOGUP) are part of OPRE’s comprehensive HPOG evaluation strategy and fund studies conducted by university researchers partnering with one or more HPOG program to answer specific questions about how to improve HPOG services within local contexts. In 2016, OPRE awarded a second round of HPOGUP grants (HPOGUP 2.0) to the following universities:

    • Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Institute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP), conducting a study...

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program funds demonstration projects that provide training and education to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) is evaluating the HPOG Program using a multipronged strategy to examine program implementation, systems change, and outcomes and impacts for participants.

    The HPOG University Partnership Research Grants (HPOGUP) are part of OPRE’s comprehensive HPOG evaluation strategy and fund studies conducted by university researchers partnering with one or more HPOG program to answer specific questions about how to improve HPOG services within local contexts. In 2016, OPRE awarded a second round of HPOGUP grants (HPOGUP 2.0) to the following universities:

    • Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Institute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP), conducting a study titled, Study of Career Advancement and Quality Jobs in Health Care in partnership with the WorkPlace, Inc. in Bridgeport, Connecticut;
    • Loyola University of Chicago, conducting a study titled, Evaluation of Goal-Directed Psychological Capital and Employer Coaching in Health Profession Opportunity Development in partnership with Chicago State University in Chicago, Illinois;
    • Northwestern University, Institute for Policy Research, conducting a study titled, The Northwestern University Two-Generation Study (NU2Gen) of Parent and Child Human Capital Advancement in partnership with the Community Action Project of Tulsa County, (CAP Tulsa) in Oklahoma. (Author introduction)
  • Individual Author: Booshehri, Layla G.; Dugan, Jerome; Patel, Falguni; Bloom, Sandra; Chilton, Mariana
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) has limited success in building self-sufficiency, and rarely addresses exposure to trauma as a barrier to employment. The objective of the Building Wealth and Health Network randomized controlled trial was to test effectiveness of financial empowerment combined with trauma-informed peer support against standard TANF programming. Through the method of single-blind randomization we assigned 103 caregivers of children under age six into three groups: control (standard TANF programming), partial (28-weeks financial education), and full (same as partial with simultaneous 28-weeks of trauma-informed peer support). Participants completed baseline and follow-up surveys every 3 months over 15 months. Group response rates were equivalent throughout. With mixed effects analysis we compared post-program outcomes at months 9, 12, and 15 to baseline. We modeled the impact of amount of participation in group classes on participant outcomes. Despite high exposure to trauma and adversity results demonstrate that, compared to the other groups,...

    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) has limited success in building self-sufficiency, and rarely addresses exposure to trauma as a barrier to employment. The objective of the Building Wealth and Health Network randomized controlled trial was to test effectiveness of financial empowerment combined with trauma-informed peer support against standard TANF programming. Through the method of single-blind randomization we assigned 103 caregivers of children under age six into three groups: control (standard TANF programming), partial (28-weeks financial education), and full (same as partial with simultaneous 28-weeks of trauma-informed peer support). Participants completed baseline and follow-up surveys every 3 months over 15 months. Group response rates were equivalent throughout. With mixed effects analysis we compared post-program outcomes at months 9, 12, and 15 to baseline. We modeled the impact of amount of participation in group classes on participant outcomes. Despite high exposure to trauma and adversity results demonstrate that, compared to the other groups, caregivers in the full intervention reported improved self-efficacy and depressive symptoms, and reduced economic hardship. Unlike the intervention groups, the control group reported increased developmental risk among their children. Although the control group showed higher levels of employment, the full intervention group reported greater earnings. The partial intervention group showed little to no differences compared with the control group. We conclude that financial empowerment education with trauma-informed peer support is more effective than standard TANF programming at improving behavioral health, reducing hardship, and increasing income. Policymakers may consider adapting TANF to include trauma-informed programming. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2007 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations