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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Foster, Leslie; Brown, Randall; Phillips, Barbara; Carlson, Barbara Lepidus
    Reference Type: Report, Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    Informal caregivers provide vital personal care and other supportive services to Medicaid beneficiaries who have physical dependencies, so promoting their well-being is an important policy objective. Caregiver well-being could be greatly affected by the amount, types, and quality of paid supportive services that beneficiaries receive in addition to informal help. This study compares the experiences of informal caregivers under two models of paid supportive services that were tested in the Arkansas Cash and Counseling demonstration. Under the experimental model, Medicaid beneficiaries could receive an allowance to direct their own services. Under the traditional model, beneficiaries relied on home care agencies for services. (author introduction)

    Informal caregivers provide vital personal care and other supportive services to Medicaid beneficiaries who have physical dependencies, so promoting their well-being is an important policy objective. Caregiver well-being could be greatly affected by the amount, types, and quality of paid supportive services that beneficiaries receive in addition to informal help. This study compares the experiences of informal caregivers under two models of paid supportive services that were tested in the Arkansas Cash and Counseling demonstration. Under the experimental model, Medicaid beneficiaries could receive an allowance to direct their own services. Under the traditional model, beneficiaries relied on home care agencies for services. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Liu, Su; Croake, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The Medicaid Buy-In program is a key component of the federal effort to make it easier for people with disabilities to work without losing health benefits. Authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Ticket Act), the Buy-In program allows states to expand Medicaid coverage to workers with disabilities whose income and assets would ordinarily make them ineligible for Medicaid. To be eligible for the Buy-In program, an individual must have a disability (as defined by the Social Security Administration, SSA) and earned income, and must meet other financial eligibility requirements established by states. States have some flexibility to customize their Buy-In programs to their unique needs, resources and objectives. As of December 31, 2009, 37 states with a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) reported covering slightly more than 150,000 individuals in the Medicaid Buy-In program.

    This issue brief, the eleventh in a series on workers with disabilities, provides an in-depth profile of Buy-In participants...

    The Medicaid Buy-In program is a key component of the federal effort to make it easier for people with disabilities to work without losing health benefits. Authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Ticket Act), the Buy-In program allows states to expand Medicaid coverage to workers with disabilities whose income and assets would ordinarily make them ineligible for Medicaid. To be eligible for the Buy-In program, an individual must have a disability (as defined by the Social Security Administration, SSA) and earned income, and must meet other financial eligibility requirements established by states. States have some flexibility to customize their Buy-In programs to their unique needs, resources and objectives. As of December 31, 2009, 37 states with a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) reported covering slightly more than 150,000 individuals in the Medicaid Buy-In program.

    This issue brief, the eleventh in a series on workers with disabilities, provides an in-depth profile of Buy-In participants who have severe mental illness and compares their characteristics, employment experiences, and medical expenditures with those of other participants in the program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Shaffer, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This brief uses the Family Resource Simulator and Basic Needs Budget Calculator, policy analysis tools developed by the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), to demonstrate the basic costs associated with living and working in North Dakota and illustrate the important role of work supports in helping low-income families make ends meet. The brief also assesses the efficacy of North Dakota’s work support policies in helping families achieve economic security, with a focus on how a small adjustment to North Dakota Healthy Steps (State Children’s Health Insurance program or SCHIP) eligibility could positively impact the health and finances of working families. (Author introduction excerpt)

     

    This brief uses the Family Resource Simulator and Basic Needs Budget Calculator, policy analysis tools developed by the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), to demonstrate the basic costs associated with living and working in North Dakota and illustrate the important role of work supports in helping low-income families make ends meet. The brief also assesses the efficacy of North Dakota’s work support policies in helping families achieve economic security, with a focus on how a small adjustment to North Dakota Healthy Steps (State Children’s Health Insurance program or SCHIP) eligibility could positively impact the health and finances of working families. (Author introduction excerpt)

     

  • Individual Author: Abdus, Salam; Hudson, Julie; Hill, Steven C.; Selden, Thomas M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Both Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which are run by the states and funded by federal and state dollars, offer health insurance coverage for low-income children. Thirty-three states charged premiums for children at some income ranges in CHIP or Medicaid in 2013. Using data from the 1999–2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, we show that the relationship between premiums and coverage varies considerably by income level and by parental access to employer-sponsored insurance. Among children with family incomes above 150 percent of the federal poverty level, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 1.6-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage. In this income range, the increase in uninsurance may be higher among those children whose parents lack an offer of employer-sponsored insurance than among those whose parents have such an offer. Among children with family incomes of 101–150 percent of poverty, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 6.7-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage and a 3....

    Both Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which are run by the states and funded by federal and state dollars, offer health insurance coverage for low-income children. Thirty-three states charged premiums for children at some income ranges in CHIP or Medicaid in 2013. Using data from the 1999–2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, we show that the relationship between premiums and coverage varies considerably by income level and by parental access to employer-sponsored insurance. Among children with family incomes above 150 percent of the federal poverty level, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 1.6-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage. In this income range, the increase in uninsurance may be higher among those children whose parents lack an offer of employer-sponsored insurance than among those whose parents have such an offer. Among children with family incomes of 101–150 percent of poverty, a $10 increase in monthly premiums is associated with a 6.7-percentage-point reduction in Medicaid or CHIP coverage and a 3.3-percentage-point increase in uninsurance. In this income range, the increase in uninsurance is even larger among children whose parents lack offers of employer coverage. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Leung, Pauline; O'Leary, Christopher J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Recent efforts to expand unemployment insurance (UI) eligibility are expected to increase low-earning workers’ access to UI. Although the expansion’s aim is to smooth the income and consumption of previously ineligible workers, it is possible that UI benefits simply displace other sources of income. Standard economic models predict that UI delays reemployment, thereby reducing wage income. Additionally, low-earning workers are often eligible for benefits from means-tested programs, which may decrease with UI benefits. In this paper, we estimate the impact of UI eligibility on employment, means-tested program participation, and income after job loss using a unique individual-level administrative data set from the state of Michigan. To identify a causal effect, we implement a fuzzy regression discontinuity design around the minimum earnings threshold for UI eligibility. Our main finding is that while UI eligibility increases jobless durations by up to 25 percent and temporarily lowers receipt of cash assistance (TANF) by 63 percent, the net impact on total income is still positive...

    Recent efforts to expand unemployment insurance (UI) eligibility are expected to increase low-earning workers’ access to UI. Although the expansion’s aim is to smooth the income and consumption of previously ineligible workers, it is possible that UI benefits simply displace other sources of income. Standard economic models predict that UI delays reemployment, thereby reducing wage income. Additionally, low-earning workers are often eligible for benefits from means-tested programs, which may decrease with UI benefits. In this paper, we estimate the impact of UI eligibility on employment, means-tested program participation, and income after job loss using a unique individual-level administrative data set from the state of Michigan. To identify a causal effect, we implement a fuzzy regression discontinuity design around the minimum earnings threshold for UI eligibility. Our main finding is that while UI eligibility increases jobless durations by up to 25 percent and temporarily lowers receipt of cash assistance (TANF) by 63 percent, the net impact on total income is still positive and large. In the quarter immediately following job loss, UI-eligible workers have 46-61 percent higher incomes than ineligibles. (Author abstract)

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